City of Canterbury-Bankstown

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City of Canterbury Bankstown
New South Wales
Canterbury-Bankstown lga sydney.png
Location of Canterbury-Bankstown in Sydney area
Population
 • Density3,125.5/km2 (8,095/sq mi)
Established12 May 2016
Area110.8 km2 (42.8 sq mi)
MayorKhal Asfour
Region
State electorate(s)
Federal Division(s)
Cbcity logo.png
WebsiteCity of Canterbury Bankstown
LGAs around City of Canterbury Bankstown:
Cumberland Strathfield & Burwood Inner West
Fairfield City of Canterbury Bankstown Inner West
Liverpool Georges River Bayside

The City of Canterbury Bankstown is a local government area located in the Inner West and South Western region of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The council was formed on 12 May 2016 from a merger of the City of Canterbury and the City of Bankstown,[3] after a review of local government in New South Wales by the state government.

The Council comprises an area of 110.8 square kilometres (42.8 sq mi) and as at the 2016 census had a population of 346,302, making it the most populous local government area in Sydney.[1]

The inaugural Mayor of Canterbury-Bankstown is Khal Asfour,[4] the final Mayor of Bankstown and a member of the Labor Party, who was elected on 26 September 2017.[5]

Suburbs in the local government area[edit]

Suburbs in the City of Canterbury Bankstown area are:

Heritage listings[edit]

The City of Canterbury Bankstown has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Demographics[edit]

Selected historical census data for the City of Canterbury Bankstown
Census year 2016[1] 2011[13] 2006[13] 2001[13]
Population Estimated residents on census night 346,302 319,807 300,274 294,833
LGA rank in terms of size within New South Wales 1st
% of New South Wales population 4.63%
% of Australian population 1.48%
Cultural and language diversity
Ancestry,
top responses
Lebanese 12.5%
Australian 11.8%
English 10.2%
Chinese 9.4%
Vietnamese 6.0%
Language,
top responses
(other than English)
Arabic 17.2%
Vietnamese 7.2%
Greek 5.4%
Mandarin 5.0%
Cantonese 3.9%
Religious affiliation
Religious affiliation,
top responses
Catholic 23.4%
Islam 20.8%
No religion 15.0%
Eastern Orthodox 8.9%
Not stated 8.6%
Median weekly incomes
Personal income Median weekly personal income A$502
% of Australian median income 75.8%
Family income Median weekly family income A$1,437
% of Australian median income 82.9%
Household income Median weekly household income A$1,298
% of Australian median income 90.3%

Council composition[edit]

The City of Canterbury Bankstown was under the management of Administrator Richard Colley and Interim General Manager Matthew Stewart until elections were held on 9 September 2017 and the first meeting of the elected council on 26 September 2017. The Code of meeting practice for Bankstown City Council was adopted as the provisional code for the new council.[14] The first meeting of the council was held at Bankstown Council Chambers on 24 May 2016.[15] Jim Montague PSM, Canterbury Council General Manager from 1983–2016, was initially proclaimed as a Deputy General Manager of the new council, but retired two weeks after the proclamation.[16]

Mayor Term Notes
Administrator Richard Colley 12 May 2016 – 26 September 2017 General Manager of Bankstown 2000–2007 and Administrator of Wollongong 2010–2011[14]
Mayor Khal Asfour 26 September 2017 – date Mayor of Bankstown 2011–2014, 2015–2016[5]
Deputy Mayor Bilal El-Hayek 19 September 2019 – date [17]
General Manager Term Notes
Matthew Stewart 12 May 2016 – present General Manager of Bankstown 2010–2016[14]

Council[edit]

The Council comprises fifteen Councillors elected proportionally, with three Councillors elected in five wards. On 9 September 2017 the current council was elected for a fixed three-year term of office.[3][14] The Mayor and Deputy Mayor are elected by the councillors for two-year and one-year terms respectively.

Current composition[edit]

The most recent election was held on 9 September 2017, and the makeup of the Council, by order of election, is as follows:

Party Councillors
Australian Labor Party 9
Liberal Party of Australia 5
Greens NSW 1
Total 15
Ward Councillor Party Notes
Bankstown Ward[18] Khal Asfour Labor Mayor 2017–date
George Zakhia Liberal
Bilal El-Hayek Labor Deputy Mayor 2019–date
Bass Hill Ward[19] Alex Kuskoff Labor Bankstown North Ward Councillor 2008–2016
Charlie Ishac Liberal
Rachelle Harika Labor
Canterbury Ward[20] Clare Raffan Labor Deputy Mayor 2018–2019
Philip Madirazza Liberal
Linda Eisler Greens Canterbury East Ward Councillor 2008–2016
Revesby Ward[21] Linda Downey Labor Mayor of Bankstown 2014–2015
Glen Waud Liberal Bankstown West Ward Councillor 2008–2016
Steve Tuntevski Labor
Roselands Ward[22] Nadia Saleh Labor Deputy Mayor 2017–2018
Mohammad Zaman Liberal
Mohammad Huda Labor

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Canterbury-Bankstown (A)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 5 July 2017. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "3218.0 – Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2017-18". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 27 March 2019. Retrieved 27 March 2019. Estimated resident population (ERP) at 30 June 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Canterbury-Bankstown Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 14 May 2016.
  4. ^ "Councillor Khal Asfour". www.cbcity.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 25 February 2019.
  5. ^ a b Buckley, Danielle (2 October 2017). "Labor's Khal Asfour elected first mayor of Canterbury-Bankstown". Canterbury-Bankstown Express. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  6. ^ "Ashfield Reservoir (Elevated) (WS 0003)". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01622. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  7. ^ "Belmore Railway Station Group". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01081. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  8. ^ "Canterbury Railway Station group". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01109. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  9. ^ "Bethungra". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00224. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  10. ^ "Old Sugarmill". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00290. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  11. ^ "Cooks River Sewage Aqueduct". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01322. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  12. ^ "Wolli Creek Aqueduct". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01355. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  13. ^ a b c "Population and dwellings | City of Canterbury Bankstown | Community profile". profile.id.com.au. Retrieved 24 December 2019.
  14. ^ a b c d "Local Government (Council Amalgamations) Proclamation 2016 [NSW] - Schedule 2 - Provisions for the City of Canterbury Bankstown" (PDF). Parliament of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. p. 14. Retrieved 8 October 2016.
  15. ^ Taylor, James (29 May 2016). "First Canterbury Bankstown merged council meeting with administrator Richard Colley over in a flash". Canterbury-Bankstown Express. Retrieved 8 October 2016.
  16. ^ Ngo, Cindy (31 May 2016). "Former Canterbury Council general manager Jim Montague steps down and bids farewell to local government after 50 years". Canterbury-Bankstown Express. Retrieved 8 October 2016.
  17. ^ "Mayor and Deputy Mayor elected". CBCity News. 19 September 2019. Retrieved 25 September 2019.
  18. ^ "Canterbury-Bankstown - Bankstown Ward - Final Results". NSW Local Council Elections 2017. NSW Electoral Commission. Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  19. ^ "Canterbury-Bankstown - Bass Hill Ward". NSW Local Council Elections 2017. NSW Electoral Commission. Retrieved 16 September 2017.
  20. ^ "Canterbury-Bankstown - Canterbury Ward". NSW Local Council Elections 2017. NSW Electoral Commission. Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  21. ^ "Canterbury-Bankstown - Revesby Ward". NSW Local Council Elections 2017. NSW Electoral Commission. Retrieved 16 September 2017.
  22. ^ "Canterbury-Bankstown - Roselands Ward". NSW Local Council Elections 2017. NSW Electoral Commission. Retrieved 16 September 2017.