Canterbury (UK Parliament constituency)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Canterbury
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Canterbury in Kent
Outline map
Location of Kent within England
CountyKent
Population109,280 (2011 census)[1]
Electorate80,203 (2019 estimate)[2] 73,779 (December 2010)[3]
Major settlementsCanterbury, Whitstable
Current constituency
Created1918
Member of ParliamentRosie Duffield (Labour)
Number of membersOne
1295–1918
Number of members1295–1885: Two
1885–1918: One
Type of constituencyBorough constituency

Canterbury is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Rosie Duffield of the Labour Party.[n 2]

The seat dates to the earliest century of regular parliaments, in 1295; it elected two MPs until 1885, electing one thereafter, before being altered by the later-termed Fourth Reform Act in 1918 (the first being in 1832). Currently the electorate, total of people eligible to vote, is much greater than the average nationwide (the electoral quota), termed under-apportionment of representation.

Constituency profile[edit]

The seat takes in the cathedral and university city of Canterbury, rural villages to the south, and the seaside resort of Whitstable to the north.

History[edit]

Constitutional status of seat

The widened Canterbury constituency was formed from an expansion of the narrow parliamentary borough (or simply borough) of the same name that existed from 1295 to 1918. This had elected two MPs from 1295 (the Model Parliament) until 1885, and then one until 1918.

Political history

From 1835 (where a Conservative was elected on petition) until 2017, the local electorate elected candidates of the Conservative Party (with the exception of the election of Independent Unionist Francis Bennett-Goldney, MP from 1910–18); the seat was recognised in the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest uninterrupted period of one party holding a Parliamentary seat. The election of Labour's Rosie Duffield, who won the seat by just 187 votes in the 2017 election, marked the end of a 185-year period of Canterbury always electing Conservative-allied MPs, the longest recorded unbroken record of party representation in British political history. She kept the seat, increasing her majority in 2019.

Size of electorate

Voters locally are under-apportioned a large fraction of a seat, and so, representative – population having risen, and homes having increased in a planned way, since the 2001 United Kingdom Census from which seats are predominantly drawn. This can be illustrated in that 27,182 was the number of votes cast for the runner-up in 2019 amid a locally high, three-quarters, turnout election. Such voters for the runner-up were more than voted for the winner in 208 of the 535 English seats – and the second-highest such votes in the election, exceeded only in Stroud, by Labour's runner-up. In the same election 12,713 votes won Kingston upon Hull East; 14,557 votes won Stoke-on-Trent Central; 6,531 votes won Na h-Eileanan an Iar; 11,705 won Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross; 12,959 won Ynys Môn and 15,149 won South Antrim.

Boundaries[edit]

Map of current boundaries

1918–1950: The County Borough of Canterbury, the Urban Districts of Herne Bay and Whitstable, the Rural Districts of Bridge and Elham, and the Rural District of Blean with the detached parts of the parishes of Dunkirk and Hernhill which were wholly surrounded by the rural district.

1950–1983: The County Borough of Canterbury, the Urban Districts of Herne Bay and Whitstable, and the Rural District of Bridge Blean.

1983–1997: The City of Canterbury wards of Barham Downs, Barton, Blean Forest, Chartham, Chestfield, Gorrell, Harbledown, Harbour, Little Stour, Marshside, Northgate, North Nailbourne, St Stephen's, Seasalter, Stone Street, Sturry North, Sturry South, Swalecliffe, Tankerton, Westgate, and Wincheap, and the Borough of Swale wards of Boughton and Courtenay.

1997–2010: as 1983 less the two Borough of Swale wards.

2010–present: The City of Canterbury wards of Barham Downs, Barton, Blean Forest, Chartham and Stone Street, Chestfield and Swalecliffe, Gorrell, Harbledown, Harbour, Little Stour, North Nailbourne, Northgate, St Stephen's, Seasalter, Sturry North, Sturry South, Tankerton, Westgate, and Wincheap.

Members of Parliament[edit]

MPs 1295-1660MPs 1660-1880MPs 1885-1918MPs 1918-2017ElectionsSee alsoNotes and references

Parliamentary borough of Canterbury[edit]

MPs 1295–1660[edit]

Parliament First member Second member
1386 Thomas Holt John Symme[4]
1388 (February) John Mendham William Ellis[4]
1388 (September) John Creking John Wimpole[4]
1390 (January) Thomas Lincoln Thomas Ickham[4]
1390 (November)
1391 Edmund Horne John Proude[4]
1393 John Sexton Richard Gervays[4]
1394 John Proude Robert Farthing[4]
1395 William Ellis Thomas Ickham[4]
1397 (January) Richard Gervays John Sexton[4]
1397 (September) Edmund Horne Robert Farthing[4]
1399 John Sheldwich I Thomas Lane[4]
1401 Thomas Ickham John Pirie[4]
1402 John Sheldwich I Robert Cooper[4]
1404 (January) Thomas Chicche John Sexton[4]
1404 (October) John Umfray John Haute[4]
1406 Edmund Horne Richard Water[4]
1407 John Sexton Richard Water[4]
1410 Thomas Lane Henry Lynde[4]
1411 William Ickham William Rose[4]
1413 (February) William Lane John Sheldwich II[4]
1413 (May) Thomas Lane William Emery[4]
1414 (April) Richard Water John Sheldwich II[4]
1414 (November) Thomas Lane John Sheldwich II[4]
1415 John Sheldwich II[4]
1416 (March) Henry Lynde John Sheldwich II[4]
1416 (October) William Ickham William Benet[4]
1417 John Sheldwich II Henry Lynde[4]
1419 John Monyn John Sheldwich II[4]
1420 William Benet William Ickham[4]
1421 (May) John Sheldwich II William Lane[4]
1421 (December) Thomas Langdon Thomas Norman[4]
1425 William Benet[5]
1435 William Benet[5]
1450 William Benet[5]
1483 Sir George Browne (died 1483)
1489 John Crysp[6]
1504 Thomas Atwode
1510 William Crump Thomas Atwode[7]
1512 Thomas Wainfleet John Hales I[7]
1515 Thomas Atwode John Hales I[7]
1523 Christopher Hales John Bridges[7]
1529 Thomas Atwode, died
and replaced February 1535 by
Robert Darknall
John Bridges[7]
1536 Robert Darknall John Bridges[7]
1539 John Starkey Robert Lewis[7]
1542 Robert Darknall Walter Hendley[7]
1545 Robert Lewis ?[7]
1547 Robert Darknall Thomas Hales[7]
1553 (March) Robert Darknall George Webbe[7]
1553 (October) John Twyne William Coppyn[7]
1554 (April) John Twyne William Coppyn[7]
1554 (November) Nicholas Fish Richard Railton[7]
1558 Sir Henry Crispe William Roper[7]
1558/59 Sir Thomas Finch George Maye[8]
1562/63 William Lovelace Robert Alcock[8]
1571 William Lovelace} Robert Alcock[8]
1572 Anthony Webbe, died
and replaced 1582 by
Sir George Carey
William Lovelace, died
and replaced 1578 by ?
[8]
1584 Simon Brome John Rose[8][9]
1586 Simon Brome John Rose[8]
1588 Simon Brome Bartholomew Brome[8]
1593 Richard Lee Sir Henry Finch[8]
1597 John Boys Sir Henry Finch[8]
1601 John Boys John Rogers II[8]
1604 John Boys Matthew Hadde
1614 George Newman Sir William Lovelace
1621–1622 John Finch Sir Robert Newington
1624 Thomas Scot Thomas Denn
1625 John Fisher Sir Thomas Wilsford
1626 Sir John Finch James Palmer
1628–1629 Sir John Finch Thomas Scott
1629–1640 No Parliaments summoned
1640 (April) Edward Masters John Nutt
1640 (November) Sir Edward Masters John Nutt
1645 Sir Edward Masters John Nutt
1648 Sir Edward Masters John Nutt
1653 Canterbury not represented in Barebones Parliament
1654 Thomas Scot Francis Butcher
1656 Thomas St Nicholas Vincent Denne
1659 Thomas St Nicholas Robert Gibbon
1659 Sir Edward Masters John Nutt

Back to Members of Parliament

MPs 1660–1880[edit]

Election First member[10] Party Second member[10] Party
1660 Sir Anthony Aucher Heneage Finch
1661 Francis Lovelace Sir Edward Master
1664 Thomas Hardres
February 1679 Edward Hales William Jacob
August 1679 Sir Thomas Hardres
1681 Lewis Watson Vincent Denne
1685 Sir William Honywood, Bt Henry Lee
1695 George Sayer
1698 Henry Lee
1705 John Hardres
1708 Edward Watson Thomas D'Aeth
1710 John Hardres Henry Lee
1715 Sir Thomas Hales, Bt
1722 Samuel Milles
1727 Sir William Hardres, Bt[11]
1734[11] Thomas May
1735[11] Sir Thomas Hales, Bt
1741 Thomas Watson Thomas Best
1746 by-election Sir Thomas Hales, Bt
1747 Matthew Robinson
1754 Sir James Creed
1761 Richard Milles Thomas Best
1768 William Lynch
1774 Sir William Mayne
1780 George Gipps Charles Robinson
1790 Sir John Honywood, Bt
1796 John Baker Whig[12] Samuel Elias Sawbridge Whig[12]
Election declared void 2 March 1797
March 1797 by-election John Baker Whig[12] Samuel Elias Sawbridge Whig[12]
May 1797 Sir John Honywood, Bt Tory[12] George Gipps Tory[12]
1800 by-election George Watson
1802 John Baker Whig[12]
1806 James Simmons
February 1807 by-election Samuel Elias Sawbridge Whig[12]
May 1807 Edward Taylor Whig[12]
1812 Stephen Rumbold Lushington Tory[12]
1818 Edward Bligh Whig[12]
1830 Richard Watson Whig[12] George Cowper Whig[12]
Jan 1835 Albert Denison Whig[12][13][14][15][16] Frederick Villiers Whig[12]
March 1835 Stephen Rumbold Lushington Conservative[12]
1837[17] James Bradshaw Conservative[12]
1841 by-election[18] George Smythe Conservative[12]
1847 by-election Albert Denison Whig[12][13][14][15][16]
1850 by-election Frederick Romilly Radical[19][20][21]
1852 Henry Plumptre Gipps Conservative Henry Butler-Johnstone Conservative
1853 Constituency representation suspended
1854 by-election Charles Manners Lushington Peelite[22][23][24] Sir William Somerville, Bt[25] Whig[22][24][26]
1857 Henry Butler-Johnstone Conservative
1859 Liberal
1862 by-election Henry Munro-Butler-Johnstone Conservative
1865[27] John Walter Huddleston Conservative
1868 Independent Conservative Theodore Brinckman Liberal
1874 Conservative Lewis Majendie Conservative
1878 by-election Hon. Alfred Gathorne-Hardy Conservative
1879 by-election Robert Peter Laurie Conservative
1880 Constituency representation suspended

Back to Members of Parliament

MPs 1885–1918[edit]

  • Constituency representation restored and reduced to one (1885)
Election Member[10][28] Party
1885 John Heaton Conservative
December 1910 Francis Bennett-Goldney Independent Unionist
1918 by-election George Anderson Conservative
1918 Parliamentary borough abolished, name transferred to a new county division

Back to Members of Parliament

Canterbury county constituency[edit]

MPs 1918–2017[edit]

Election Member[10][28] Party Notes
1918 Ronald McNeill Conservative Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (19 October 1927 – 4 June 1929)
Financial Secretary to the Treasury (1925 – 1927)
1927 by-election Sir William Wayland Conservative Mayor of Deptford (1914 – 1920)
1945 John Baker White Conservative
1953 by-election Sir Leslie Thomas Conservative
1966 Sir David Crouch Conservative
1987 Sir Julian Brazier Conservative Minister of State for Reserves (14 July 2014 – 16 July 2016)
2017 Rosie Duffield Labour

Back to Members of Parliament

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General election 2019: Canterbury[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Rosie Duffield 29,018 48.3 +3.3
Conservative Anna Firth 27,182 45.2 +0.5
Liberal Democrats Claire Malcomson 3,408 5.7 −2.3
Independent Michael Gould 505 0.8 New
Majority 1,836 3.1 +2.8
Turnout 60,113 75.0 +2.3
Labour hold Swing +1.4
General election 2017: Canterbury[30]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Rosie Duffield 25,572 45.0 +20.5
Conservative Julian Brazier 25,385 44.7 +1.8
Liberal Democrats James Flanagan 4,561 8.0 −3.6
Green Henry Stanton 1,282 2.3 −4.7
Majority 187 0.3 N/A
Turnout 56,800 72.7 +8.7
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +9.3
General election 2015: Canterbury[31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Julian Brazier[32] 22,918 42.9 −1.9
Labour Hugh Lanning[32] 13,120 24.5 +8.4
UKIP Jim Gascoyne[32] 7,289 13.6 +9.7
Liberal Democrats James Flanagan[32] 6,227 11.6 −20.9
Green Stuart Jeffery[33] 3,746 7.0 +4.7
Socialist (GB) Robert Cox[34] 165 0.3 New
Majority 9,798 18.4 +6.1
Turnout 53,465 64.0 -0.1
Conservative hold Swing −5.2
General election 2010: Canterbury[35]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Julian Brazier 22,050 44.8 +0.3
Liberal Democrats Guy Voizey 16,002 32.5 +11.1
Labour Jean Samuel 7,940 16.1 −12.0
UKIP Howard Farmer[36] 1,907 3.9 +1.9
Green Geoff Meaden 1,137 2.3 −1.0
Money Reform Anne Belsey 173 0.4 New
Majority 6,048 12.3 -3.5
Turnout 49,209 64.1 −2.3
Conservative hold Swing −5.4

Back to Elections

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General election 2005: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Julian Brazier 21,113 44.4 +2.9
Labour Alex Hilton 13,642 28.7 −8.2
Liberal Democrats Jenny Barnard-Langston 10,059 21.1 +3.3
Green Geoffrey Meaden 1,521 3.2 +1.2
UKIP John Moore 926 1.9 +0.1
Legalise Cannabis Rocky van de Benderskum 326 0.7 New
Majority 7,471 15.7 +11.1
Turnout 47,587 66.1 +5.2
Conservative hold Swing +5.5
General election 2001: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Julian Brazier 18,711 41.5 +2.9
Labour Emily Thornberry 16,642 36.9 +5.6
Liberal Democrats Peter Wales 8,056 17.8 −6.0
Green Hazel Dawe 920 2.0 +0.9
UKIP Lisa Moore 803 1.8 +1.3
Majority 2,069 4.6 −2.7
Turnout 45,132 60.9 −11.5
Conservative hold Swing −1.4

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General election 1997: Canterbury[37]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Julian Brazier 20,913 38.6 −11.8
Labour Cheryl Hall 16,949 31.3 +15.9
Liberal Democrats Martin Vye 12,854 23.8 −8.8
Referendum James Osborne 2,460 4.5 New
Green Geoffrey Meaden 588 1.1 New
UKIP John Moore 281 0.5 New
Natural Law Andrew Pringle 64 0.1 New
Majority 3,964 7.3 −11.1
Turnout 54,109 72.4 −5.7
Conservative hold Swing -13.9
General election 1992: Canterbury[38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Julian Brazier 29,827 50.8 −3.0
Liberal Democrats M J Vye 19,022 32.4 +5.1
Labour MF Whitemore 8,936 15.2 −1.7
Green WJ Arnall 747 1.3 −0.4
Natural Law SE Curphey 203 0.3 New
Majority 10,805 18.4 −8.1
Turnout 58,735 78.1 +4.1
Conservative hold Swing −4.0

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General election 1987: Canterbury[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Julian Brazier 30,273 53.8 −2.7
Liberal John Purchese 15,382 27.3 +1.5
Labour Linda A. Keen 9,494 16.9 +1.5
Green Steve Dawe 947 1.68 −0.19
Independent Canterbury Nationalist Joan White 157 0.28 New
Majority 14,891 26.47 −4.15
Turnout 56,255 73.96 +3.98
Conservative hold Swing −2.07
General election 1983: Canterbury[40]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Crouch 29,029 56.47 -1.81
Liberal John Purchese 13,287 25.85 +9.83
Labour Jeannette Gould 7,906 15.38 -8.90
Ecology David Conder 962 1.87 New
Independent Nationalist Joan White 226 0.44 New
Majority 15,742 30.62 -3.38
Turnout 51,410 69.98 -4.74
Conservative hold Swing -5.82

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General election 1979: Canterbury[41]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Crouch 38,805 58.28 +8.47
Labour RP Spencer 16,168 24.28 -1.82
Liberal J Purchese 10,665 16.02 -6.31
National Front Joan White 941 1.41 -0.35
Majority 22,637 34.00 +11.29
Turnout 66,578 74.72 +2.11
Conservative hold Swing +5.15
General election October 1974: Canterbury[42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Crouch 31,002 49.81 -0.53
Labour MF Fuller 16,247 26.10 +3.01
Liberal SE Goulden 13,898 22.33 -3.13
National Front Kenneth McKilliam 1,096 1.76 +0.54
Majority 14,755 23.71 -1.27
Turnout 62,239 72.61 -7.63
Conservative hold Swing -1.77
General election February 1974: Canterbury[43]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Crouch 34,341 50.34 -5.08
Liberal S Goulden 17,300 25.36 +6.09
Labour MF Fuller 15,751 23.09 -2.22
National Front Kenneth McKilliam 831 1.22 New
Majority 17,041 24.98 -5.13
Turnout 68,220 80.24 +5.67
Conservative hold Swing -5.59
General election 1970: Canterbury[44]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Crouch 33,222 55.42 +5.58
Labour Henry Gordon N Clother 15,172 25.31 -2.90
Liberal David C P Gracie 11,553 19.27 -2.68
Majority 18,050 30.11 +8.48
Turnout 59,950 74.57 -1.53
Conservative hold Swing +4.24

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

General election 1966: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Crouch 27,160 49.84 -2.13
Labour B Sawbridge 15,372 28.21 -1.26
Liberal Edwin W Moss 11,962 21.95 +3.39
Majority 11,788 21.63 -0.87
Turnout 54,494 76.10 -0.22
Conservative hold Swing -1.70
General election 1964: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Leslie Thomas 26,827 51.97 -14.23
Labour George Selous Cobbett 15,211 29.47 -4.33
Liberal Edwin W Moss 9,582 18.56 New
Majority 11,616 22.50 -9.90
Turnout 51,620 76.32 +1.18
Conservative hold Swing -9.28

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General election 1959: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Leslie Thomas 30,846 66.20 -0.35
Labour George E Peters 15,746 33.80 +0.35
Majority 15,100 32.40 -0.70
Turnout 46,592 75.14 +2.48
Conservative hold Swing -0.35
General election 1955: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Leslie Thomas 28,739 66.55 +5.46
Labour Reginald George Ward 14,444 33.45 +2.42
Majority 14,295 33.10 +3.04
Turnout 43,183 72.66 -7.40
Conservative hold Swing +3.94
1953 Canterbury by-election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Leslie Thomas 19,400 66.99 +5.90
Labour John A E Jones 9,560 33.01 +1.98
Majority 9,930 33.98 +3.92
Turnout 28,960
Conservative hold Swing +3.94
General election 1951: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Baker White 28,632 61.09 +5.14
Labour John A E Jones 14,543 31.03 +0.27
Liberal Thomas H Payne 3,695 7.88 -5.42
Majority 14,089 30.06 +4.87
Turnout 46,870 80.06 -2.42
Conservative hold Swing +2.71
General election 1950: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Baker White 26,491 55.95 -6.66
Labour Jackson Newman 14,563 30.76 -5.05
Liberal Kenneth Graham Jupp 6,296 13.30 N/A
Majority 11,928 25.19 -3.61
Turnout 47,350 82.48 +13.70
Conservative hold Swing -5.86

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1940s[edit]

General election 1945: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Baker White 24,282 61.61 -11.73
Labour Joseph Denis Milburn Bell 14,115 35.81 +10.15
Common Wealth Catherine Williamson 1,017 2.58 New
Majority 10,167 25.80 -22.88
Turnout 39,414 68.78 +4.33
Conservative hold Swing

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1930s[edit]

General election 1935: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William Wayland 26,552 74.34 -9.33
Labour Richard Adams 9,164 25.66 +9.33
Majority 17,388 48.68 -18.66
Turnout 35,716 64.45 -1.77
Conservative hold Swing -9.33
General election 1931: Canterbury
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William Wayland 30,328 83.67 +27.0
Labour Paul Winterton 5,921 16.33 +2.4
Majority 24,407 67.34 +40.0
Turnout 36,249 66.22 -2.1
Conservative hold Swing

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1920s[edit]

General election 1929: Canterbury[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Unionist William Wayland 19,181 56.7 −13.6
Liberal David Carnegie 9,937 29.4 −0.3
Labour Philip Sidney Eastman 4,706 13.9 New
Majority 9,244 27.3 −13.3
Turnout 33,825 68.3 +2.4
Registered electors 49,499
Unionist hold Swing −6.7
1927 Canterbury by-election[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Unionist William Wayland 13,657 57.3 −13.0
Liberal David Carnegie 10,175 42.7 +13.0
Majority 3,482 14.6 −26.0
Turnout 23,832 60.8 −5.1
Registered electors 39,229
Unionist hold Swing −13.0
General election 1924: Canterbury[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Unionist Ronald McNeill 16,693 70.3 +11.9
Liberal David Carnegie 7,061 29.7 −11.9
Majority 9,632 40.6 +23.8
Turnout 23,754 65.9 +9.4
Registered electors 36,045
Unionist hold Swing +11.9
General election 1923: Canterbury[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Unionist Ronald McNeill 12,017 58.4 −12.8
Liberal William Robertson Heatley 8,561 41.6 New
Majority 3,456 16.8 −25.6
Turnout 20,578 59.3 +2.5
Registered electors 34,715
Unionist hold Swing N/A
General election 1922: Canterbury[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Unionist Ronald McNeill 13,954 71.2 −9.6
Labour J.H.L. Sims 5,639 28.8 +9.6
Majority 8,315 42.4 −19.2
Turnout 19,593 56.8 +11.9
Registered electors 34,488
Unionist hold Swing −9.6

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1910s[edit]

Woodcock
General election January 1910: Canterbury[45][46]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Henniker Heaton 1,371 38.8 −24.9
Ind. Conservative Francis Bennett-Goldney 1,350 38.2 New
Liberal H. B. D. Woodcock 815 23.0 −13.3
Majority 21 0.6 −26.8
Turnout 3,536 92.2 +2.4
Registered electors 3,836
Conservative hold Swing −5.8
Bennett-Goldney
General election December 1910: Canterbury[45][46]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Ind. Conservative Francis Bennett-Goldney 1,635 47.8 +9.6
Conservative John Howard 1,163 34.0 −4.8
Liberal William James Fisher 623 18.2 −4.8
Majority 472 13.8 N/A
Turnout 3,421 89.2 −3.0
Registered electors 3,836
Ind. Conservative gain from Conservative Swing +7.2

General Election 1914/15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

1918 Canterbury by-election[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Unionist George Knox Anderson Unopposed
Unionist gain from Independent Unionist
General Election 1918: Canterbury[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
C Unionist Ronald McNeill 11,408 80.8 +46.8
Labour Edward Timothy Palmer 2,719 19.2 New
Majority 8,689 61.6 N/A
Turnout 14,127 44.9 −44.3
Registered electors 31,453
Unionist gain from Independent Unionist Swing N/A
C indicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1900s[edit]

General election 1900: Canterbury[45][48][49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Henniker Heaton Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1906: Canterbury[45][48]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Henniker Heaton 2,210 63.7 N/A
Liberal William James Fisher 1,262 36.3 New
Majority 948 27.4 N/A
Turnout 3,472 89.8 N/A
Registered electors 3,868
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1890s[edit]

General election 1892: Canterbury[45][48]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Henniker Heaton Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1895: Canterbury[45][48][49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Henniker Heaton Unopposed
Conservative hold

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1880s[edit]

General election 1880: Canterbury (2 seats)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Alfred Gathorne-Hardy 1,467 27.1 −4.6
Conservative Robert Peter Laurie 1,425 26.4 −3.5
Liberal Charles Edwards[51] 1,294 23.9 +4.0
Liberal Henry Butler-Johnstone 1,218 22.5 +3.9
Majority 131 2.5 −7.5
Turnout 2,702 (est) 73.6 (est) −2.1
Registered electors 3,671
Conservative hold Swing −4.3
Conservative hold Swing −3.7

After findings of corruption, the writ for Canterbury was suspended and the election result voided. The constituency was reconstituted in 1885.

Heaton
General election 1885: Canterbury[48][52][53]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Henniker Heaton 1,804 68.6 +15.1
Liberal William Aubrey 825 31.4 −15.1
Majority 979 37.2 +34.7
Turnout 2,629 84.6 +11.0 (est)
Registered electors 3,107
Conservative hold Swing +15.1
General election 1886: Canterbury[45][48]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Henniker Heaton Unopposed
Conservative hold

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1870s[edit]

General election 1874: Canterbury (2 seats)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Butler-Johnstone 1,488 31.7 −0.2
Conservative Lewis Majendie 1,406 29.9 +4.5
Liberal Theodore Brinckman 934 19.9 +6.3
Liberal Robert John Biron[54] 873 18.6 +5.0
Majority 472 10.0 N/A
Turnout 2,351 (est) 75.7 (est) −20.8
Registered electors 3,103
Conservative gain from Ind. Conservative Swing N/A
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing −0.9

Butler-Johnstone resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 2 Mar 1878: Canterbury[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Alfred Gathorne-Hardy Unopposed
Conservative hold

Majendie resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 8 May 1879: Canterbury[50][55]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Robert Peter Laurie 1,159 51.2 −10.4
Liberal Charles Edwards[51] 1,103 48.8 +10.3
Majority 56 2.4 −7.6
Turnout 2,262 73.2 −2.5
Registered electors 3,089
Conservative hold Swing −10.4

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1860s[edit]

Johnstone resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 6 Mar 1862: Canterbury (1 seat)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Butler-Johnstone 694 50.1 N/A
Liberal William Lyon[56] 691 49.9 N/A
Majority 3 0.2 N/A
Turnout 1,385 74.9 N/A
Registered electors 1,850
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General election 1865: Canterbury (2 seats)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Butler-Johnstone 767 27.8 N/A
Conservative John Walter Huddleston 737 26.7 N/A
Liberal William Lyon[56] 643 23.3 N/A
Liberal Robert Adair 614 22.2 N/A
Majority 94 3.4 N/A
Turnout 1,381 (est) 86.1 (est) N/A
Registered electors 1,603
Conservative hold Swing N/A
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing N/A
General election 1868: Canterbury (2 seats)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Ind. Conservative Henry Butler-Johnstone[57] 1,453 31.9 New
Liberal Theodore Brinckman 1,236 27.1 +3.8
Conservative John Walter Huddleston 1,157 25.4 −1.3
Conservative Henry James Lee Warner[58] 709 15.6 −22.2
Turnout 2,896 (est) 96.5 (est) +10.4
Registered electors 3,001
Majority 217 4.8 N/A
Ind. Conservative gain from Conservative Swing N/A
Majority 79 1.7 N/A
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +2.6

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1850s[edit]

Denison was elevated to the peerage, becoming 1st Baron Londesborough, and causing a by-election.

By-election, 4 March 1850: Canterbury[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Radical Frederick Romilly Unopposed
Radical gain from Whig
General election 1852: Canterbury (2 seats)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Plumptre Gipps 766 29.1 N/A
Conservative Henry Butler-Johnstone 758 28.8 N/A
Whig William Somerville 570 21.6 −6.5
Radical Frederick Romilly 533 20.2 N/A
Conservative George Smythe 7 0.3 −26.9
Majority 188 7.2 N/A
Turnout 1,317 (est) 70.3 (est) −1.2
Registered electors 1,874
Conservative hold Swing N/A
Conservative gain from Whig Swing N/A
  • Smythe retired before polling.[59] The election was declared void on petition, due to bribery, and the writ suspended on 21 February 1853.[60] A by-election was called to replace both MPs in August 1854.
By-election, 18 August 1854: Canterbury (2 seats)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Peelite Charles Manners Lushington 727 28.6 −0.5
Whig William Somerville 699 27.5 +5.9
Conservative Charles Lennox Butler[61] 671 26.4 −2.4
Whig Charles Purton Cooper[62][63] 406 16.0 N/A
Radical Edward Glover[64][65] 41 1.6 −18.6
Turnout 1,272 (est) 64.5 (est) −5.8
Registered electors 1,973
Majority 28 1.1 N/A
Peelite gain from Conservative Swing −3.2
Majority 28 1.1 N/A
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +3.7
General election 1857: Canterbury (2 seats)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Butler-Johnstone 815 39.7 −28.5
Whig William Somerville 759 37.0 +26.2
Whig Charles Purton Cooper[62][63] 477 23.3 +12.5
Majority 56 2.7 −4.5
Turnout 1,026 (est) 54.7 (est) −15.6
Registered electors 1,876
Conservative hold Swing −23.9
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +20.2
General election 1859: Canterbury (2 seats)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Butler-Johnstone Unopposed
Liberal William Somerville Unopposed
Registered electors 1,831
Conservative hold
Liberal hold

Back to Elections

Elections in the 1840s[edit]

General election 1847: Canterbury (2 seats)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Albert Denison 808 28.1 −3.6
Conservative George Smythe 782 27.2 −9.0
Conservative John Vance 643 22.4 N/A
Conservative Thomas Charles Pelham-Clinton 641 22.3 N/A
Majority 26 0.9 N/A
Turnout 1,437 (est) 71.5 (est) −4.2
Registered electors 2,010
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +0.5
Conservative hold Swing −0.5
By-election, 15 March 1847: Canterbury (1 seat)[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Albert Denison Unopposed
Whig gain from Conservative
  • Caused by Bradshaw's death
General election 1841: Canterbury (2 seats)[12][50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative George Smythe 823 36.2 +10.5
Conservative James Bradshaw 729 32.1 +6.8
Whig Thomas Twisden Hodges 720 31.7 −17.3
Majority 9 0.4 +0.2
Turnout 1,451 75.7 −6.4
Registered electors 1,918
Conservative hold Swing +9.6
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +7.7
By-election, 3 February 1841: Canterbury[12][50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative George Smythe 772 54.5 +3.5
Whig John Wright Henniker Wilson[66] 628 44.3 −4.7
Whig Thomas Twisden Hodges 17 1.2 N/A
Majority 144 10.2 +10.0
Turnout 1,417 73.9 −8.2
Registered electors 1,918
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +4.1
  • Caused by Denison's resignation

Elections in the 1830s[edit]

General election 1837: Canterbury (2 seats)[12][50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative James Bradshaw 761 25.7 +9.9
Whig Albert Conyngham 755 25.5 −10.9
Conservative Henry Plumptre Gipps 751 25.3 +9.5
Whig Frederick Villiers 698 23.5 −8.3
Turnout 1,507 82.1 −7.0
Registered electors 1,835
Majority 6 0.2 N/A
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +9.8
Majority 4 0.2 +0.2
Whig hold Swing −10.3
General election 1835: Canterbury (2 seats)[12][50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Albert Conyngham 755 36.4 −5.1
Whig Frederick Villiers 660 31.8 −8.1
Conservative Stephen Rumbold Lushington 658 31.7 New
Majority 2 0.1 −21.1
Turnout 1,307 89.1 +9.5
Registered electors 1,467
Whig hold Swing N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
  • On petition, Villiers was declared unduly elected and Lushington declared elected.
General election 1832: Canterbury (2 seats)[12][50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Richard Watson 834 41.5 N/A
Whig George Cowper 802 39.9 N/A
No label William Percy Honeywood Courtenay 375 18.6 New
Majority 427 21.2 N/A
Turnout 1,203 79.6 N/A
Registered electors 1,467
Whig hold Swing N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
General election 1831: Canterbury (2 seats)[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Richard Watson Unopposed
Whig George Cowper Unopposed
Whig hold
Whig hold
General election 1830: Canterbury (2 seats)[12][67]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Richard Watson 1,334 41.9
Whig George Cowper 1,101 34.6
Tory Henry Bingham Baring 731 23.0
No label Samuel Elias Sawbridge 8 0.3
No label George Milles 8 0.3
Majority 370 11.6 N/A
Turnout 1,988
Registered electors
Whig hold Swing
Whig gain from Tory Swing

Back to Elections

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least once every five years.
References
  1. ^ "Canterbury: Usual Resident Population, 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 16 February 2015.
  2. ^ https://electionresults.parliament.uk/election/2019-12-12/Results/Location/Constituency/Canterbury/
  3. ^ "Electorate Figures". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae "History of Parliament 1386-1421". History of Parliament. Retrieved 16 November 2011.
  5. ^ a b c History of Parliament
  6. ^ P. R. Cavill (2009). The English Parliaments of Henry VII 1485-1504. OUP Oxford. p. 164. ISBN 978-0-19-161026-4.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "History of Parliament 1509-1558". History of Parliament. Retrieved 16 November 2011.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "History of Parliament 1558-1603". History of Parliament. Retrieved 16 November 2011.
  9. ^ Browne Willis
  10. ^ a b c d Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "C" (part 2)
  11. ^ a b c Sir William Hardres was re-elected in 1734, but the result was overturned on petition and his seat awarded in 1735 to Sir Thomas Hales
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, FWS (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 158–160. ISBN 0-900178-13-2.
  13. ^ a b Boase, George Clement (1897). "Denison, Albert" . In Lee, Sidney (ed.). Dictionary of National Biography. 52. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  14. ^ a b Mosse, Richard Bartholomew (1838). The Parliamentary Guide: a concise history of the Members of both Houses, etc. p. 156.
  15. ^ a b "The Elections". West Kent Guardian. 31 July 1847. p. 4 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  16. ^ a b "Important Notice". Kentish Gazette. 3 August 1847. p. 2 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  17. ^ A petition was lodged against the 1837 result, but withdrawn
  18. ^ A petition was lodged against the result of the by-election in February 1841, but it was dismissed
  19. ^ "The Nomination". Bell's Weekly Messenger. 26 February 1859. p. 6 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  20. ^ "County Intelligence". Dover Express. 19 February 1859. p. 4 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  21. ^ "Latest Intelligence". Worcestershire Chronicle. 6 March 1850. p. 8 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  22. ^ a b "Election Intelligence". Norfolk Chronicle. 19 August 1854. p. 2 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  23. ^ "England and Wales". The Spectator. 14 March 1857. p. 9.
  24. ^ a b "Election News". Perthshire Advertiser. 17 August 1854. p. 2 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  25. ^ Sir William Somerville was known from 1863 as The Lord Athlumney
  26. ^ le Grys Norgate, Gerald (1898). "Somerville, William Meredyth" . In Lee, Sidney (ed.). Dictionary of National Biography. 53. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  27. ^ A petition was lodged against the 1865 result, but withdrawn
  28. ^ a b "Canterbury 1660-". Hansard 1803–2005. UK Parliament. Retrieved 2 February 2015.
  29. ^ "Canterbury Parliamentary constituency". BBC News. BBC. Retrieved 27 November 2019.
  30. ^ "Candidates standing in Kent and Medway across Kent's 17 parliamentary constituencies". Kent Online.
  31. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  32. ^ a b c d "CANTERBURY 2015". electionresults.blogspot.co.uk.
  33. ^ "Canterbury and Whitstable parliamentary campaign launch". Canterbury District Green Party. 20 November 2014.
  34. ^ "General Election - Campaign News - The Socialist Party of Great Britain". worldsocialism.org. Archived from the original on 20 January 2015. Retrieved 16 January 2015.
  35. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  36. ^ "UK Independence Party »". Candidates.ukip.org. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 18 April 2010.
  37. ^ "Canterbury". Politicsresources.net. Archived from the original on 3 June 2016. Retrieved 18 April 2010.
  38. ^ "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Archived from the original on 11 August 2011. Retrieved 6 December 2010.
  39. ^ "UK General Election results: June 1987 [Archive]". Politicsresources.net. 11 June 1987. Archived from the original on 19 March 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2010.
  40. ^ "UK General Election results: June 1983 [Archive]". Politicsresources.net. 9 June 1983. Archived from the original on 19 March 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2010.
  41. ^ "UK General Election results: May 1979 [Archive]". Politicsresources.net. 28 May 1979. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 18 April 2010.
  42. ^ "UK General Election results: October 1974 [Archive]". Politicsresources.net. 10 October 1974. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 18 April 2010.
  43. ^ "UK General Election results: February 1974 [Archive]". Politicsresources.net. 28 February 1974. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 18 April 2010.
  44. ^ "UK General Election results 1970 [Archive]". Politicsresources.net. 18 June 1970. Archived from the original on 11 August 2011. Retrieved 18 April 2010.
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n F W S Craig, British Parliamentary Election Results 1918–1949; Political Reference Publications, Glasgow 1949
  46. ^ a b Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1916
  47. ^ Standard 21 May 1914
  48. ^ a b c d e f The Liberal Year Book, 1907
  49. ^ a b Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1901
  50. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (e-book) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.
  51. ^ a b "The Canterbury Election Petition". Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald. 19 June 1880. pp. 2–4.
  52. ^ British Parliamentary Election Results 1885–1918, FWS Craig
  53. ^ Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1886
  54. ^ "Canterbury". The Daily Telegraph and Courier. 29 January 1874. p. 5 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  55. ^ "Canterbury Election". Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald. 10 May 1879 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  56. ^ a b "To the Freemen & Electors of the City of Canterbury". Kentish Gazette. 4 March 1862. p. 1 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  57. ^ "Canterbury". Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald. 12 September 1868. p. 4 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  58. ^ "Canterbury". Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser. 5 December 1868. p. 2 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  59. ^ "The General Election". The Spectator. 10 July 1852. p. 2.
  60. ^ "Imperial Parliament". Leeds Times. 26 February 1853. p. 8 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  61. ^ "Canterbury Election". Kentish Gazette. 22 August 1854. p. 3 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  62. ^ a b Eadie, Alan, "Charles Purton Cooper, QC (1793-1873)", Provincial Grand Lodge of Mark Master Masons of Kent, p. 3 – via British Newspaper Archive Missing or empty |url= (help)
  63. ^ a b "Canterbury Journal". Canterbury Journal, Kentish Times and Farmers' Gazette. 12 August 1854. p. 3.
  64. ^ "The elections for the five delinquent and suspended boroughs". The Spectator. 19 August 1854. p. 3.
  65. ^ "The Forthcoming Elections". Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury. 19 August 1854. p. 3 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  66. ^ "The Atlas". 6 February 1841. pp. 4–5 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  67. ^ Farrell, Stephen. "Canterbury". The History of Parliament. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
Sources
  • Iain Dale, ed. (2003). The Times House of Commons 1929, 1931, 1935. Politico's (reprint). ISBN 1-84275-033-X.
  • The Times House of Commons 1945. 1945.
  • The Times House of Commons 1950. 1950.
  • The Times House of Commons 1955. 1955.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°18′N 1°3′E / 51.300°N 1.050°E / 51.300; 1.050