Canterbury Television

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CTV – Canterbury Television
Current CTV logo
Launched June 1991
Owned by Star Media
Picture format 16:9
Country New Zealand
Broadcast area Canterbury
Headquarters 12 Venture Place
Christchurch
Formerly called CHTV, NOW TV
Sister channel(s) VTV Visitor Television
Website CTV
Availability
Terrestrial
Digital (Ceased 16 December 2016 11:59pm NZDT) Freeview Channel 40
Canterbury
Analogue (Ceased 28 April 2013 2:00am NZDT) UHF 44 655.25 MHz from Sugarloaf
Cable
Vodafone InHomeTV Channel 199
The CTV building in 2004

Canterbury Television was an independent television station broadcasting in Canterbury, New Zealand.

The name is synonymous with regional television in New Zealand as it was the name of the first regional broadcaster to operate in New Zealand. CTV produces and screens more than twenty hours of locally based programming every week. It also screens overseas programming from Deutsche Welle and Al Jazeera. It broadcasts from the Sugarloaf transmitter on the Port Hills.

On 22 February 2011 Christchurch was hit by a 6.3 magnitude earthquake and the CTV Building collapsed killing 16 staff members and destroying all of CTV’s equipment. On 18 April 2011 CTV resumed service in a new base location at the Mainland Press building in the Christchurch suburb of Harewood.

As of 18 March 2013, CTV commenced digital free-to-air transmissions on Freeview Channel 40. CTV is also on Vodafone Channel 199. The station ceased broadcasting on Friday, 16 December 2016 at midnight. CTV will now operate as a web-based platform from 19 December 2016 under the Star Media brand.

History[edit]

In 1999, yet to be signed New Zealand soprano Hayley Westenra performed on CTV. The appearance led to her being signed by Universal Music Group New Zealand.

In 2003, NowTV (formerly known as CHTV) and CTV merged, headquartered into the NowTV Building.

In 2006, CTV was the chief sponsor of the Canterbury United soccer team.

Today in Canterbury, a nightly news programme, started in March 2008.

In late 2008 CTV gained popularity with the New Zealand professional wrestling promotion Impact Pro Wrestling airing IPW Ignition weekly. The first episode premiered on the 5 October 2008.

In March 2009, CTV started screening Graham Kerr's Kitchen and Nick Stellino's Cucina Amore, half-hour cooking programmes from the 1990s.

In September 2010, the CTV Building had received superficial damage in the 4 September earthquake, but was "given a clean bill of health" by structural engineers, according to the owners.[1] Nevertheless, it collapsed in the February 2011 earthquake, resulting in the greatest single source of loss of life in that earthquake. The building had been built around 1986 (although reports of the building's construction date vary: Chip Le Grand of The Australian said - possibly confusing it with the older CHTV3 building - 1960;[2] a 1 March 2011 NZPA report said 1991 or shortly before;[3] and a 4 March 2011 New Zealand Herald editorial said 1972[4]).

On 18 April 2011, CTV was back on air at 5.30 pm for the first time since February's earthquake.[5] The station began with a two-hour broadcast of news and then another hour of interviews with people involved in the earthquake recovery. Shows would screen nationwide on Māori Television the day after each CTV broadcast.[5]

On 18 March 2013, CTV joined Freeview, broadcasting from Sugarloaf, Christchurch on Channel 40. They extended their reach to South Canterbury on 1 June 2013, broadcasting from Cave Hill, Timaru.

CTV was bought by Star Media in August 2015 and relocated to the company's premises in Middleton.

2011 Christchurch earthquake[edit]

Main article: CTV Building
The CTV Building post-earthquake (24 February 2011)

The six-storey CTV Building[1] located at 249 Madras Street, on the Cashel Street corner (43°31′58″S 172°38′33″E / 43.532751°S 172.6424°E / -43.532751; 172.6424), collapsed in the 22 February 2011 Christchurch earthquake[6] and CTV lost transmission. CTV's main studios were destroyed and the building's lift cavity, the main part of the structure left upright, caught fire. On 23 February, police decided that the damage was not survivable, and rescue efforts at the building were suspended. Initially more than 100 people were believed to have died in the building. Fire-fighting and recovery operations resumed that evening.[7] Of the 166 confirmed dead by 12 March 2011, 94 were recovered from the CTV building.[8][9] Many of the dead and missing were faculty and students at the King's Education school for English language, located on the third floor of the CTV building.[10] King's drew students from Asia and elsewhere.[11] The school was attempting to provide as much information as possible to families.[12]

The Port Hills transmitters were understood to be undamaged. CTV's sister channel VTV (Visitors Television) also ceased broadcasting because of the quake.

CTV's website was still functioning immediately after the earthquake, but was later replaced with this statement:

A coronial inquest into the CTV building's collapse reported back to the Government in December 2012, one month later than expected,[14] finding the building's design was deficient and should not have been approved.

Past presenters[edit]

  • Sue Wells – host of Susan Sells
  • Phil Gifford – Co-host of 'Gifford and Balani'
  • Jo Giles – host of 'Shopping with Jo' and 'In Depth' (Died in the 2011 Canterbury Earthquake)
  • Jim Hopkins – host of The Knackered Chef, Jim Hopkins Tonight and A Smattering of Ominions

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Chapman, Kate (2 March 2011). "CTV building's owners welcome collapse inquiry". stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 2 March 2011. 
  2. ^ Le Grand, Chip (28 February 2011). "Demolition work at CTV tower an issue for quake inquiry". The Australian. Retrieved 4 March 2011. 
  3. ^ "CTV building owners welcome inquiry, death toll now at 155". The New Zealand Herald. 1 March 2011. Retrieved 4 March 2011. 
  4. ^ "Editorial: Quake work needs limits and balance". The New Zealand Herald. 4 March 2011. Retrieved 4 March 2011. 
  5. ^ a b "CTV back on air". kiwinewsonline.co.nz. 19 April 2011. Retrieved 12 May 2011. 
  6. ^ "More bodies expected to be pulled from CTV building". 3news.co.nz. 22 February 2011. Retrieved 22 February 2011. 
  7. ^ "Christchurch quake toll 75, dozens missing". Stuff.co.nz. 24 February 2011. Retrieved 23 September 2011. 
  8. ^ Morgan, Jared (12 March 2011). "Christchurch earthquake death toll still not clear". The Press. www.stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 12 March 2011. 
  9. ^ Madden, James; Callick, Rowan (5 March 2011). "'We don't use the word dead' – Japan goes in where others give up hope". perthnow.com. Retrieved 5 March 2011. 
  10. ^ Steven Joyce (24 February 2011). "Govt expresses grave concern for Kings Education missing". www.beehive.govt.nz. Retrieved 28 February 2011.
  11. ^ "Iconic Christchurch CTV building becomes a tomb Archived 1 March 2011 at the Wayback Machine.". The Seattle Times. 25 February 2011.
  12. ^ Post 22 February 2011 earthquake update Archived 10 March 2011 at the Wayback Machine.. King's Education.
  13. ^ CTV website Retrieved on 24 February 2011 ≈11:55 (UTC)
  14. ^ "CTV coronial inquest restarts 13 months on". 3 News NZ. 29 October 2012. 

External links[edit]