Canthus

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For other uses, see Canthus (disambiguation).
Canthus
Gray892.png
Front of left eye with eyelids separated to show medial canthus.
Dorlands
/Elsevier
c_05/12210029
Anatomical terminology

Canthus (pl. canthi, palpebral commissures) is either corner of the eye where the upper and lower eyelids meet.[1] More specifically, the inner and outer canthi are, respectively, the medial and lateral ends/angles of the palpebral fissure.

The bicanthal plane is the transversal plane linking both canthi and defines the upper boundary of the midface.

Commissures[edit]

  • The lateral palpebral commissure (commissura palpebrarum lateralis; external canthus) is more acute than the medial, and the eyelids here lie in close contact with the bulb of the eye.
  • The medial palpebral commissure (commissura palpebrarum medialis; internal canthus) is prolonged for a short distance toward the nose, and the two eyelids are separated by a triangular space, the lacus lacrimalis.

Surgery[edit]

Canthoplasty refers to a plastic surgery of the medial and/or lateral canthus.

A canthotomy involves cutting the canthus, often performed to release excessive orbital pressure (i.e., from orbital hemorrhage or infection).

Pathology[edit]

"Dystopia canthorum" is a lateral displacement of the inner canthi of the eyes, giving an appearance of a widened nasal bridge.[2] Dystopia canthorum is associated with Waardenburg syndrome.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "canthus" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary
  2. ^ Genetic Hearing Loss from UTMB, Dept. of Otolaryngology. DATE: March 17, 2004. RESIDENT PHYSICIAN: Jing Shen. FACULTY PHYSICIAN: Ronald W. Deskin, MD. SERIES EDITORS: Francis B. Quinn, Jr., MD and Matthew W. Ryan, MD.
  3. ^ Tagra S, Talwar AK, Walia RL, Sidhu P (2006). "Waardenburg syndrome". Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 72 (4): 326. doi:10.4103/0378-6323.26718. PMID 16880590. 

External links[edit]