Cap (crown)

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The cap of a crown is the cap which fills the inner space of a modern crown. While ancient crowns contained no cap, from mediaeval times it became traditional to fill the circlet with a cap of velvet or other such cloth, with a base of ermine.

While the precise reason for the inclusion of a cap is unknown, two reasons are often given:

  • to add to the visual impact of the crown, while showing off the golden circlet to maximum effect;
  • to keep a monarch's head warm in drafty mediaeval buildings during long coronation ceremonies or public events where crowns were worn.

Not all crowns contained cloth caps. Some caps were metallic and heavily jewelled.