Capital punishment for cannabis trafficking

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Several countries have either carried out or legislated capital punishment for cannabis trafficking.

Country Status Notes
Saudi Arabia Has been used An Iraqi man named Mattar bin Bakhit al-Khazaali was convicted of smuggling hashish in the northern town of Arar, close to the Iraqi border and was executed in 2005.[1]
Indonesia Has been used In 1997, the Indonesian government[citation needed] added the death penalty as a punishment for those convicted of drugs in their country. The law has yet to be enforced on any significant, well-established drug dealers. The former Indonesian President, Megawati Sukarnoputri announced Indonesia's intent to implement a fierce war on drugs in 2002. She called for the execution of all drug dealers. "For those who distribute drugs, life sentences and other prison sentences are no longer sufficient," she said. "No sentence is sufficient other than the death sentence." Megawati's successor, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, also proudly supported executions for drug dealers.[2]
Malaysia Has been used Mustaffa Kamal Abdul Aziz, 38 years old, and Mohd Radi Abdul Majid, 53 years old, were executed at dawn on January 17, 1996, for the trafficking of 1.2 kilograms of cannabis.[3]
Philippines No longer imposed: Extrajudicial killings now commonplace The Philippines abolished the death penalty on June 24, 2006.[4] Previously, the Philippines had introduced stronger anti-drug laws, including the death penalty, in 2002.[5] Possession of over 500 grams of marijuana usually earned execution in the Philippines, as did possessing over ten grams of opium, morphine, heroin, ecstasy, or cocaine. Angeles City is often a Vatican for Filipino cannabis users and cultivators, although enforcement has been inconsistent.[6]
United Arab Emirates Sentenced In the United Arab Emirates city of Fujairah, a woman named Lisa Tray was sentenced to death in December 2004, after being found guilty of possessing and dealing hashish. Undercover officers in Fujairah claim they caught Tray with 149 grams of hashish. Her lawyers have appealed the sentence.[citation needed]

In July 2012, a 23-year-old British man Nathaniel Lees,[7] and an unnamed 19-year-old Syrian citizen was sentenced to death for attempting to sell 20 grams (about 3/4 of an ounce) of marijuana to an undercover officer in Dubai. [8] [9] [10] This was later commuted to four years in prison.[11]

Singapore Frequently used Death penalty has been carried out many times for cannabis trafficking. (July 20, 2004) A convicted drug trafficker, Raman Selvam Renganathan who stored 2.7 kilograms of cannabis or marijuana in a Singapore flat was hanged in Changi Prison. He was sentenced to death on September 1, 2003 after an eight-day trial. (The Straits Times, July 20, 2004).
People's Republic of China Frequently used A 2011 article points out that the death penalty is exercised regularly for drug tradings under Chinese law, often corresponding to the United Nations' International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Drug Trafficking.[12] The government does not make precise records public, however Amnesty International estimates that around 500 people are executed there each year for drug offenses.[citation needed] Those executed have typically been convicted of smuggling or trafficking in anything from cannabis to methamphetamine.[citation needed]
United States Never imposed While current US federal law allows for the death penalty for those who have extraordinary amounts of the drug (60,000 kilograms or 60,000 plants) or are part of a continuing criminal enterprise in smuggling contraband which nets over $20 million, the United States Supreme Court has held that no crimes other than murder and treason can constitutionally carry a death sentence; however, Kennedy v. Louisiana left open the possibility of capital punishment for crimes against the state (e.g., treason, espionage, drug kingpin activity) regardless of whether or not death actually occurred. (Coker v. Georgia and Kennedy v. Louisiana)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Saudi Arabia: Pakistani and Iraqi Beheaded in Saudi Arabia". Mapinc.org. 2005-01-02. Retrieved 2011-02-17.
  2. ^ "Death for pot in Indonesia". Cannabisculture.com. 2009-06-20. Archived from the original on 2011-03-07. Retrieved 2011-02-17.
  3. ^ "Amnesty International Deplores Recent Executions" (Press release). Amnesty International. 1996-01-17. Archived from the original on April 8, 2005.
  4. ^ Toms, Saah (2006-06-24). "Philippines stops death penalty". BBC. Retrieved 2013-05-24.
  5. ^ "Philippines Enacts Death Penalty for Drug Dealing, Possession of a Pound of Marijuana or Tens Grams of Ecstasy". Stopthedrugwar.org. Retrieved 2011-02-17.
  6. ^ "Philippine minors in Jail: Report 6 September 2002". Preda Foundation, Inc. Archived from the original on November 1, 2009.
  7. ^ David Blair (2012-06-29). "Briton on death row in Abu Dhabi is company director's son". Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-05-24.
  8. ^ Schreck, Adam (2012-06-26). "UAE: Death Sentence Handed Down To Briton Convicted On Drug Charges". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2013-05-24.
  9. ^ "Briton facing UAE death penalty". BBC. 2012-06-25. Retrieved 2013-05-24.
  10. ^ "British man sentenced to death for attempting to sell drugs to UAE officer" (Text article). Fox News. Associated Press. 2012-06-26. Retrieved 2013-05-24.
  11. ^ UAE court overturns death sentences of Briton and Syrian for drug dealing The National (Abu Dhabi) 13 March 2013
  12. ^ "China Celebrates UN Anti-Drug Day With 59 Executions". Stopthedrugwar.org. Retrieved 2011-02-17.