Caproni Ca.164

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Ca.164
Caproni Ca.164.jpg
Role Military trainer aircraft
Manufacturer Caproni
Designer Raffaele Conflenti
Primary users Regia Aeronautica
Armée de l'Air
Number built 280 + 1 prototype [1]

The Caproni Ca.164 was a training biplane produced in Italy shortly prior to World War II. It was a largely conventional biplane intended as a follow-on to the Ca.100 and sharing that aircraft's inverted sesquiplane layout.

Development[edit]

The prototype was designated the Ca.163, built by Caproni Taliedo and first flown on 17 November 1938. It had a steel tube fuselage, wooden wings, and fabric covering.[2] Flight testing revealed some poor handling characteristics, however, which made it completely unsuitable for its intended role. Nevertheless, the Regia Aeronautica acquired some 280 examples of the Ca.164 to use in liaison roles within bomber units. Some of these were pressed into use for tactical reconnaissance during the Croatian campaign. The Armée de l'Air also purchased 100 aircraft.

Operators[edit]

 France
 Kingdom of Italy
 Italy
The prototype Ca.163 on display at the Caproni Museum, Trento.

Survivors[edit]

No examples of the Ca.164 survive, but the prototype Ca.163 is on display at the Gianni Caproni Museum of Aeronautics, Trento Airport, Italy. As a private venture, it was originally not registered, but it was later registered I-WEST.

Specifications[edit]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2, pilot and instructor
  • Length: 7.74 m (25 ft 4 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.75 m (32 ft 0 in)
  • Height: 3.00 m (9 ft 10 in)
  • Wing area: 22.4 m2 (241 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 850 kg (1,874 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,175 kg (2,590 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Alfa Romeo 115, 138 kW (185 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 230 km/h (143 mph)
  • Range: 530 km (329 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 4,200 m (13,780 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 3.6 m/s (708 ft/min)

See also[edit]

Related lists

References[edit]

  1. ^ Caproni Ca.164
  2. ^ "Caproni Ca.163". Museo dell'Aeronautica Gianni Caproni. Retrieved 5 April 2017. 
  3. ^ aeroflight
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 236. 
  • World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 891 Sheet 10. 

External links[edit]