Carbon Recycling International

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Carbon Recycling International Inc.
Private
IndustryRenewable fuels
Founded2006 (2006)
HeadquartersReykjavík, Iceland
Key people
Sindri Sindrason CEO
Omar Sigurbjornsson
(Research)
Benedikt Stefansson
(Business Development)[1]
ProductsRenewable methanol
WebsiteCRI.is

Carbon Recycling International - CRI hf. (CRI) is an Icelandic limited liability company which has developed a technology designed to produce renewable methanol from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, using water electrolysis or, alternatively, hydrogen captured from industrial waste gases. The technology is trademarked by CRI as Emissions-to-Liquids (ETL)[2][3] and the renewable methanol produced by CRI is trademarked as Vulcanol[4]. In 2011 CRI became the first company to produce and sell liquid renewable transport fuel produced using only carbon dioxide, water and electricity from renewable sources.[5]

History[edit]

CRI, incorporated in 2006, was founded by Fridrik Jonsson, Art Shulenberger, Oddur Ingolfsson, and KC Tran.[6] In addition to Icelandic individuals and funds, investors include Canadian multinational methanol supplier and distributor Methanex and Chinese multinational automotive manufacturing company Geely.

CRI's first commercial scale plant, the George Olah Plant (named after George Andrew Olah,[7] the 1994 Nobel Prize Laureate in chemstiry), was completed in 2011.[8] CRI is currently working on several new projects in parallel, including in a EU Horizon 2020 research programme funded MefCO2 consortium to build a renewable methanol demonstration plant in Germany and in the FreSME consortium to build a renewable methanol demonstration plant in Sweden.

Renewable methanol[edit]

Renewable methanol can be used as a fuel, chemical feedstock or blended with gasoline. Fuels which are produced partially or fully from methanol include biodiesel, dimethyl ether or oxymethylene ether, as well as synthetic gasoline from the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process. Gasoline blends range from 3% methanol, which is allowed in European standard gasoline, to 56% methanol, a blend for flexible fuel vehicles.[9] CRI has run fleet tests with a range of lower blends and higher blend options in cars from different manufacturers, including 100% methanol in special flexible fuel vehicles manufactured by Geely.[10][11] Renewable methanol is compatible with internal combustion engines as well as methanol fuel cells.

Production[edit]

CRI's first CSP, the GO Plant

Production of renewable methanol does not depend on agricultural resources, as hydrogen and carbon dioxide are the primary inputs. CRI's emissions-to-liquids production process is based on three main modules, carbon dioxide purification, hydrogen generation and the methanol synthesis and purification system[12]. The catalytic conversion process from hydrogen and carbon dioxide occurs in one step, while production of methanol from fossil fuels, such as natural gas or coal, involves several reforming steps to obtain syngas followed by the catalytic step[13].

Plants[edit]

The George Olah Plant, or the GO Plant, has a name-plate capacity of 5 million liters per year.[14] It is located close to the Blue Lagoon spa facility and HS Orka's Svartsengi power station. The plant can capture and utilize around 10% of the carbon dioxide emitted by the Svartsengi power station.[15]

Legislation[edit]

The European Union's renewable energy directive recognizes renewable methanol as a renewable transport fuel from non-biological sources, which means that it can be used as an advanced renewable transport fuel under the EU's renewable fuel blending mandates.

Impact[edit]

Carbon dioxide is a major cause of global warming. By removing carbon dioxide from industrial emissions, CRI's process helps to mitigate climate change. Renewable methanol burns cleanly as a fuel and substituting renewable methanol for gasoline and diesel fuels reduces urban emissions of particulate matter, sulphur oxides (SOx) and nitrous oxides (NOx)[16].

CRI's process can also be used to store energy in the form of methanol, especially in cases where the energy source is intermittent. For example, wind and solar power are intermittently available. Methanol is also a good energy carrier. As a liquid fuel it is easier and cheaper to store and transport than hydrogen or methane.

Future projects[edit]

CRI plans to implement standardized CSPs (commercial scale plants), each with a capacity of at least 50,000 tons of methanol production per year.[17]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Management". Carbon Recycling International. Archived from the original on September 29, 2013. Retrieved 11 July 2012.
  2. ^ "ETL-Technology". CRI - Carbon Recycling International. Retrieved 2018-10-25.
  3. ^ US 8198338B2, "Process for producing liquid fuel from carbon dioxide and water", issued 2012-06-12 2007-03-20 
  4. ^ "Vulcanol". CRI - Carbon Recycling International. Retrieved 2018-10-25.
  5. ^ "Framleiðsla hafin á nýju vistvænu eldsneyti". Morgunblaðið. Retrieved 24 July 2012.
  6. ^ "About Us". Carbon Recycling International. Archived from the original on September 29, 2013. Retrieved 11 July 2012.
  7. ^ Matthew Knight. "Electric car concept drives progress with extended 500-mile range". CNN. Retrieved 24 July 2012.
  8. ^ "First Commercial Plant". Carbon Recycling International. Archived from the original on July 3, 2013. Retrieved 11 July 2012.
  9. ^ "Products". Carbon Recycling International. Retrieved 13 July 2012.
  10. ^ "Eldsneyti úr útblæstri". RÚV. Retrieved 24 July 2012.
  11. ^ "Methanol car fleet test yields positive results". CRI - Carbon Recycling International. Retrieved 2018-10-25.
  12. ^ "ETL-Technology". CRI - Carbon Recycling International. Retrieved 2018-10-25.
  13. ^ Ingham, Alan (2017-10-01). "Reducing the Carbon Intensity of Methanol for Use as a Transport Fuel". Johnson Matthey Technology Review. 61 (4): 297–307. doi:10.1595/205651317x696216. ISSN 2056-5135.
  14. ^ "First Commercial Plant". Carbon Recycling International. Archived from the original on July 3, 2013. Retrieved 11 July 2012.
  15. ^ Paul Fontaine (28 February 2012). "Carbon Recycling In Effect Near Blue Lagoon". The Reykjavík Grapevine. Retrieved 24 July 2012.
  16. ^ "Methanol Fuels". methanolfuels.org. Retrieved 2018-10-25.
  17. ^ "Commercial Scale Plants". CRI - Carbon Recycling International. Retrieved 2018-10-25.

External links[edit]