Carbosulfan

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Carbosulfan
Carbosulfan.svg
Names
IUPAC name
2,2-Dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1-benzofuran-7-yl [(dibutylamino)sulfanyl]methylcarbamate
Other names
2,3-Dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl[(dibutylamino)thio] methylcarbamate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.054.132
Properties
C20H32N2O3S
Molar mass 380.55 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Carbosulfan is an organic compound adherent to the carbamate class. At normal conditions, it is brown viscose liquid. It is not very stable; it decomposes slowly at room temperature. Its solubility in water is low but it is miscible with xylene, hexane, chloroform, dichloromethane, methanol and acetone. Carbosulfan is used as an insecticide.[1] The European Union banned use of carbosulfan in 2007.[2]

Its oral LD50 for rats is 90 to 250 mg/kg bw, inhalation LC50 is 0.61 mg/L. Carbosulfan is only slightly absorbed through skin (LD50 >2000 mg/kg for rabbits). The mechanism of toxicity is based on reversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (as for carbamates generally).[3] Carbosulfan has very low maximum residue limits for use in the EU and UK examples of this can be seen in apples and oranges, where it is 0.05 mg/kg.

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