Carden Aero Engines

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Carden Aero Engines

Carden Aero Engines Limited was a 1930s British fixed-wing aero-engine manufacturer, based at Heston Aerodrome.

History[edit]

Sir John Carden established the company in March 1936, while the Flying Flea craze was sweeping Britain. He saw a need for a cheap low-powered propulsion unit for ultralight aircraft. The engine was an adaptation of the well-proven and reliable Ford 10 Model C motor car engine.

Following the death of Sir John in an air accident in December 1935, the company was taken over by Carden-Baynes Aircraft Ltd, and later sold to Chilton Aircraft Ltd, Chilton Foliat, near Hungerford, Berkshire.

Engines[edit]

Carden-Baynes Auxiliary
The Carden-Baynes Auxiliary engine, as used on the Scud III Auxiliary sailplane, was a 2.5 hp Villiers air-cooled two-stroke, capacity 350 cc.[1]
Carden-Ford 31 hp 4-cyl[2]
A much modified Ford 10 car engine.
Carden-Ford S.P.1[2]
Further development of the 31 hp engine, with a centric supercharger, 1.1:1 gear ratio, splined propeller shaft extension and horizontal mounting for flush wing mounting. Used exclusively on the Carden-Baynes Bee.

Aircraft using Carden engines[edit]

Aircraft that have used the Carden-Ford 31 hp engine are: Broughton-Blayney Brawney, B.A.C. Drone, Kronfeld Monoplane, Mignet HM.14 (Flying Flea), Perman Parasol, Taylor Watkinson Dingbat, and Chilton D.W.1 Monoplane.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jackson (1974), p.316
  2. ^ a b Lumsden, Alec. British Piston Engines and their Aircraft. Marlborough, Wiltshire: Airlife Publishing, 1994. ISBN 1-85310-294-6

References[edit]

  • Jackson, A.J.J. 1974. British Civil Aircraft, Vol.1. Putnam ISBN 0-370-10006-9
  • Lumsden, Alec. British Piston Engines and their Aircraft. Marlborough, Wiltshire: Airlife Publishing, 1994. ISBN 1-85310-294-6

External links[edit]