Suburbicarian Diocese of Ostia

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The Bishop of Ostia is the head of the suburbicarian diocese of Ostia, one of the seven suburbicarian sees of Rome. The position is now attached to the post of Dean of the College of Cardinals, as it has been since 1150,[1] with the actual governance of the diocese entrusted to the Vicar General of Rome.

Ostia and Velletri, "Ostia e Velletri" in Italian, was a single suburbicarian diocese from 1105 to 1914. In 1914, Velletri (now Velletri-Segni) was split off as a separate suburbicarian diocese. Starting then, a new Dean would add the see of Ostia to the suburbicarian see he already had.

List of bishops[edit]

Bishops of Ostia, to 1057[edit]

  • [Maximus (259)][2]
...
  • Maximus (313)[3]
  • Florentius (366)[4]
...
  • Bonus (487).
  • Bellator (499)[5]
  • Aristus (502)[6]
...
  • Amabile (649)[7]
...
  • Andrea(s) (680)[8]
...
  • Theodorus (745)[9]
  • George I, 753-783[10]
...
  • Gregory I, 787
...
  • Bernard 804-805
  • Peter I 805
vacant 805-826
  • Cesareo 826-854
  • Megisto (or Leo I), 854-868
  • Donatus, 868-870
vacant 870-878
  • Eugenius, 878-898
  • Stephen, 898-900
  • Guido I, 900-946
  • Benigno, 946-960
  • Siccone, 960-963
  • Gregory II, 964-969
  • Leo II, 969-983
vacant 983-996
  • Azzone I, 996[11]
  • Gregory III, 998-1012
  • Azzone II, 1013
  • Peter III, 1021-1037
  • Benedict, 1044
  • John I, 1050-1057?

Bishops of Ostia and Velletri, to 1378[edit]

vacant 1271-1273
vacant 1325-1327

The Great Western Schism[edit]

Bishops of Ostia and Velletri, from 1415 to 1600[edit]

Bishops of Ostia and Velletri, from 1600 to 1800[edit]

Bishops of Ostia and Velletri, from 1800 to 1900[edit]

Bishops of Ostia and Velletri, since 1900[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Guide to documents and events (76-2005) This statement of Miranda is unsourced. Moreover, Rudolf Hüls (pp.79-80) has demonstrated that the perpetual leadership of the Bishop of Ostia is not the case, but that the principle of seniority held true in Rome as it did elsewhere (cf. Hüls, pp. 77-78), before and after Pope Eugenius III. It was not until Pope Paul IV that the Deanship and the Bishopric of Ostia were tied together, in his Bull of 22 August 1555, Cum venerabiles. Bullarum diplomatum et privilegiorum sanctorum Romanorum pontificum Taurensis editio (in Latin). Tomus sextus (6). Seb. Franco. 1860. pp. 502–504. 
  2. ^ According to the Passio S. Hippolyti, the first Maximus consecrated Pope Dionysius and was the first Bishop of Ostia to consecrate a pope, but the historical value of the document is in question: Lanzoni, p. 109: "Ma che questo privilegio, nel 259, fosse esercitato da un vescovo di nome Massimo non potrebbe affermarsi sicuramente su la fede della Passione di S. Ippolito, documento romanzesco e pieno di errori."
  3. ^ Maximus of Ostia was present at the Roman synod of October 313, conducted by Pope Miltiades. J. D. Mansi (ed.) Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio editio novissima Tomus secundus (2) (Florence 1759), p. 437.
  4. ^ Bishop Florentius consecrated Pope Damasus. Lanzoni, p. 109.
  5. ^ Bellator of Ostia subscribed to the decrees of the Roman Synod of February–March 499, held by Pope Symmachus. Mansi, Tomus Octavus (8), p. 235. Bishop Boniface of Velletri also subscribed, p. 233.
  6. ^ Aristus was present at the Synod held by Pope Symmachus in 502. Ughelli, p. 47. Mansi, Vol.8, p. 299 and 308.
  7. ^ Amabile subscribed the Canons of the Roman Synod of 649. Ughelli, p. 49. Mansi, Tomus decimus (10), p. 366.
  8. ^ Andrea was present at the Roman council of Pope Agatho in 680. Ughelli, p. 49; Mansi, Tomus undecimus (11), p. 179.
  9. ^ Theodorus was present at the second Roman synod of Pope Zacharias in October 745. Ughelli, p. 49. Mansi, Tomus duodecimus (12), p. 384.
  10. ^ Bishop George was present at the Lateran council of 769: J. D. Mansi (ed.) Tomus duodecimus (12), p. 714.
  11. ^ Source for the period 996-1057: Otto Kares, Chronologie der Kardinalbischöfe im elften Jahrhundert, (in:) Festschrift zur Jahrhundertfeier des Gymnasiums am Burgplatz in Essen, Essen 1924, p. 20, 23-25
  12. ^ Sources for the period 1057-1130: Hans-Walter Klewitz, Reformpapsttum und Kardinalkolleg, Darmstadt 1957; and Rudolf Hüls, Kardinäle, Klerus und Kirchen Roms: 1049-1130, Tübingen 1977. Both authorities indicate that the see of Velletri was united to Ostia in April 1060.[page needed]
  13. ^ a b The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Papal elections and conclaves by century
  14. ^ Source for the period 1130-81: J.M.Brixius, Die Mitglieder des Kardinalkollegiums von 1130-1181, Berlin 1912, p. 134
  15. ^ Drogo was appointed by Pope Innocent II while he was in exile in Pisa in 1134. His predecessor's latest document was signed on 4 June 1133; his successor was signing documents on 9 April 1138. Ughelli, pp. 62-63. P. Jaffé, Regesta pontificum romanorum editio altera, ed. G. Loewenfeld (Leipzig:Veit 1885), p. 840. Barbara Zenker, Die Mitglieder des Kardinalcollegiums von 1130 bis 1159 (Wurzburg 1964), pp. 13-15.
  16. ^ Pierre d'Estaing, Doctor of Canon Law, had been Bishop of Saint-Flour (1361-1368), and Bishop of Bourges (1368-1370). He was created a cardinal by Pope Urban V on 7 June 1370, and assigned the titular church of S. Maria in Trastevere. Eubel, I, p. 21, 139, 251.
  17. ^ Antonio Correr of Venice, the Bishop of Bologna (1407–1412), was created a cardinal by his uncle, Pope Gregory XII on 9 May 1408, and assigned the titular church of San Pietro in Vincoli. He was promoted Cardinal-bishop of Porto 1409–1431. Eubel, I, p. 31, 36, 37, 45, 141.
  18. ^ Fieschi (also Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1449-1455)
  19. ^ Estouteville had also been Cardinal-bishop of Porto, 1455-1461.
  20. ^ Della Rovere had previously been Cardinal-bishop of Sabina, 1479-1483; he became Pope Julius II. Salvador Miranda, The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church, Consistory of December 16, 1471
  21. ^ Carafa (also Cardinal-bishop of Albano, 1476-1483 and Sabina, 1483-1503)
  22. ^ Riario had also been Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1503-1507, Sabina 1507-1508 and Porto 1508-1511.
  23. ^ Carvajal (also Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1507-1509, Sabina 1509-1521 and Palestrina 1508-1509)
  24. ^ Soderini had also been Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1516-1517, Palestrina 1516-1523 and Porto 1523.
  25. ^ Fieschi had also been Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1518-1521, Sabina 1521-1523 and Porto 1523-1524. Salvador Miranda, The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church , Consistory of May 31, 1503
  26. ^ Farnese had also been Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1519-1523, Palestrina 1523, Sabina 1523-1524 and Porto 1524; became Pope Paul III)
  27. ^ Giovanni Nanni Tedeschini-Piccolomini, Bishop of Siena (1503–1529), was created a cardinal by Pope Leo X on 1 April 1517, and assigned the titular church of Santa Sabina. In 1521 he was transferred to Santa Balbina. On 24 July 1524 he was promoted Cardinal-bishop of Albano (1524-1531); then on 22 September 1531 he was promoted to Palestrina (1531-1533); and then to Porto (1533-1535). Eubel, III, p. 15, 55-57, 297.
  28. ^ De Cupis was also Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1531-1533 and Sabina 1533-1535.
  29. ^ Carafa was also Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1544-1546, Sabina 1546-1550, Frascati 1550-1553 and Porto 1553. He became Pope Paul IV (1555–1559).
  30. ^ Bellay had also been Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1550-1553, Frascati 1553 and Porto 1553-1555.
  31. ^ Tournon had also been Cardinal-bishop of Sabina 1550-1560.
  32. ^ Pio da Carpi (also Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1550, Frascati 1553-1555 and Porto-Santa Rufina 1555-1562)
  33. ^ Pisani (also Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1555-1557, Frascati 1557-1562 and Porto 1562-1564)
  34. ^ Morone (also Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1560-1561, Sabina 1561-1562, Frascati 1562, 1564-1565, Palestrina 1562-1564 and Porto 1565-1570)
  35. ^ Farnese had also been Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1565-1578, Sabina 1564-1565 and Porto 1578-1580.
  36. ^ Serbelloni (also Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1583-1587, Sabina 1578, Palestrina 1578-1583, Porto 1587-1589)
  37. ^ Gesualdo (also Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1583-1587, Frascati 1587-1589 and Porto 1589-1591)
  38. ^ Gallio, Bishop of Manfredonia (1562-1573), who had been the private Secretary of the Pope, had been named a cardinal by Pope Pius IV in the Consistory of 12 March 1565, and was assigned the Deaconry of San Teodoro. He was promoted to San Pancrazio on 7 September 1565. He was then promoted Cardinal-bishop of Albano on 2 March 1587; then Bishop of Sabina (1589-1591) on 2 March 1589; Frascati 1591-1600; and Porto 1600-1603. Eubel, III, p. 40, 56, 58, 68, 76, 301. Gauchat, IV, p. 36.
  39. ^ Pinelli had previously been Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1603-1605 and Porto 1605-1607.
  40. ^ Joyeuse had previously been Cardinal-bishop of Sabina 1604-1611.
  41. ^ Galli had previously been Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1605-1608, Palestrina 1608-1611 and Porto 1611-1615.
  42. ^ Sauli had previously been Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1607-1611, Sabina 1611-1615, and Porto 1615-1620.
  43. ^ Del Monte had previously been Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1615-1621; and Porto 1621-1623.
  44. ^ Bandini had previously been Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1621-1624; and Bishop of Porto 1624-1626.
  45. ^ A native of Florence, Deti, who was a nephew of Pope Clement VIII, was named a cardinal in the Consistory of 3 March 1599. He was first assigned the Deaconry of Sant'Adriano al Foro. He became Cardinal Priest of Santi Marcellino e Pietro al Laterano on 6 October 1614. He was promoted Cardinal-bishop of Albano (1623-1626) on 7 June 1623; of Frascati 1626; and of Porto 1626-1629. He became Bishop of Ostia on 20 August 1629. He died in Rome on 13 July 1630. Lorenzo Cardella (1793). Memorie storiche de' cardinali della santa Romana chiesa (in Italian). Tomo sesto (6). Roma: Pagliarini. pp. 84–85.  Gauchat, IV, p. 6 no. 34.
  46. ^ Ginnasi had also been Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1626-1629; and of Porto 1629-1630.
  47. ^ Pio di Savoia had also been Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1627-1630; and of Porto 1630-1639.
  48. ^ Lante della Rovere had also been Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1629; of Frascati 1629-1639; and of Porto 1639-1641.
  49. ^ Medici was earlier Cardinal-bishop of Sabina 1645, of Frascati 1645-1652 and of Porto 1652.
  50. ^ Francesco Barberini was Cardinal-bishop of Sabina 1645-1652 and Porto 1652-1666.
  51. ^ Facchinetti was Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1672-1679 and Porto 1679-1680.
  52. ^ Albergati was also Cardinal-bishop of Sabina 1677-1681 and Porto 1681-1683.
  53. ^ Cybo was also Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1679-1680, Frascati 1680-1683 and Porto 1683-1687.
  54. ^ De la Tour was also Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1689-1698 and Porto 1698-1700. The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of August 5, 1669
  55. ^ Accaioiuli was also Cardinal-bishop of Sabina 1714-1719. The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of November 29, 1669
  56. ^ Astalli was also Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1693-1701 and Porto 1700-1715) The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of September 2, 1686
  57. ^ Tanara was also Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1715-1721. The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of December 12, 1695
  58. ^ Del Giudice was also Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1717-1721 and Frascati 1721-1724. The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of February 13, 1690
  59. ^ Paolucci was also Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1719-1724.
  60. ^ Barberini was also Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1721-1726.
  61. ^ Ottoboni was also Cardinal-bishop of Sabina 1725-1730, Frascati 1730-1734 and Porto 1734-1738).
  62. ^ Ruffo was also Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1726-1738 and Porto 1738-1740. Ritzler, V, p. 24, with note 17; 25 with notes 1-3.
  63. ^ A Neapolitan noble, Carafa had also been Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1740-1751, and of Porto 1751-1753. Ritzler, V, p. 38 with notes 10-16. VI, pp. 39, 40, 48, 50.
  64. ^ D'Elci was also Cardinal-bishop of Sabina 1747-1753. Ritzler, VI, p. 8, with notes 69-71.
  65. ^ A native of Naples, Spinelli was created a cardinal by Pope Clement XII on 17 January 1735, and assigned the titular church of Santa Pudenziana. He was promoted Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina on 9 April 1753, and advanced to Porto on 13 July 1759 He became Cardinal Bishop of Ostia and Dean of the College of Cardinals on 13 July 1761. He died 12 April 1763, and was buried in the Basilica of the Twelve Apostles in Rome. Ritzler, VI, pp. 7-8, with notes 51-53.
  66. ^ Cavalchini, a native of Milan, was created a cardinal by Pope Benedict XIII in his first Consistory for the creation of Cardinals on 9 September 1743, and assigned the titular church of Santa Maria della Pace. He was promoted Cardinal-bishop of Albano on 12 February 1759, and advanced to Ostia on 16 May 1763. Ritzler, VI, p. 31, with notes 12 and 13.
  67. ^ Serbelloni had been titular Archbishop of Patras in Greece, to qualify him for the post of Vice-Legate in Bologna. Serbelloni was created a cardinal by Pope Benedict XIV on 26 November 1753. He was Cardinal-bishop of Albano, 1763-1774. Ritzler, VI, p. 16, with notes 80 and 81.
  68. ^ Albani was Cardinal-bishop of Porto 1773-1775. Ritzler, VI, p. 15, with notes 68-69.
  69. ^ Stuart was created a cardinal by Pope Benedict XIV on 3 July 1747, and assigned the titular church of Santa Maria in Porticu. He held a succession of other churches until, on 13 July 1761, he was promoted Cardinal-Bishop of Frascati, 1761-1803. He was promoted to Ostia on 26 September 1803. Ritzler, VI, p. 16 and notes 74-76.
  70. ^ Antonelli was created a Cardinal by Pope Pius VII on 24 April 1775, with the title of Santa Sabina. In 1794 he was appointed Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina (1794–1800), and Porto (1800–1807). He was Secretary of the Holy Office of the Universal and Roman Inquisition. He died on 23 January 1811. Annuario Pontificio 1779, p. 105. Annuario Pontificio 1801, pp. 5-6. Francesco Cancellieri (1825). Cenotaphium Leonardi Antonelli Cardinalis (in Italian and Latin). Pisaurum. pp. 3–4. with notes.  Ritzler, VI, p. 30.
  71. ^ Mattei was Archbishop of Ferrara (1777–1807 ). In the Conclave of 1799–1800 Cardinal Mattei had been one of the principal candidates, promoted by the Austrian interest led by Cardinal Franz Hrzan. Mattei was then named Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina (1800-1809) and Porto (1809–1814). Francis A. Burkle-Young (2000). Papal Elections in the Age of Transition, 1878-1922. Lanham MD USA: Lexington Books. pp. 9–11. ISBN 978-0-7391-0114-8.  Ritzler, VI, p. 33, with notes 77-81; p. 215.
  72. ^ Somaglia was created a cardinal by Pope Pius VI on 1 June 1795, with the titulus of Santa Sabina. He was promoted Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1814-1818, and then Porto (1818-1820). In 1818 he was appointed Vice-Chancellor of the Church. On 29 May 1820 he became Bishop of Ostia. Ritzler, VI, p. 38, with notes 90-96.
  73. ^ Pacca was also Cardinal-bishop of Frascati, 1818-1821; and of Porto, 1821-1830. Annuario Pontificio (Roma 1845), p. 87. Carlo Gazola (1844). In morte del cardinale Bartolomeo Pacca due prose (in Italian). Roma: Tip. delle Belle Arti. 
  74. ^ Micara was earlier Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1837-1844. Gams, p. xxi.
  75. ^ Macchi was previously Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1840-1844, and then of Porto 1844-1847. Gams, pp. xix and xi.
  76. ^ Mattei had earlier been Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1844-1854 and Porto 1854-1860. Gams, pp. xxi and xi.
  77. ^ Patrizi had also been Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1849-1860, and of Porto 1860-1871. Gams, pp. xxiv and xi.
  78. ^ Amat had also been Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1852-1870, and Bishop of Porto 1871-1877. Gams, pp. xix and xi.
  79. ^ De Pietro was Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1867-1877 and Porto 1877-1878. Bräuer, pp. 55-56.
  80. ^ Sacconi was earlier Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1870-1878, and og Porto 1878-1884. Bräuer, pp. 66-67.
  81. ^ Monaco La Valletta was earlier Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1884-1889. Bräuer, pp. 83-84.
  82. ^ Oreglia was earlier Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1884-1889, and of Porto 1889-1896. Bräuer, pp. 90-91.
  83. ^ Serafino Vannutelli was also Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1893-1903 and Porto 1903-1915. Lentz, p. 195.
  84. ^ Vincenzo Vannutelli was also Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1900-1930. Lentz, p. 195.
  85. ^ Pignatelli di Belmonte was born in Naples. He was Prince of Belmonte, Duke of Acerenza, Marchese of Galatone and Count of Copertino. He was also Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1915-1948. Lentz, pp. 84-85.
  86. ^ Marchetti Selvaggiani was also Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1936-1951. Lentz, pp. 117-118.
  87. ^ Tisserant was also Cardinal-bishop of Porto 1946-1972. Lentz, p. 187-188.
  88. ^ Cicognani was also Cardinal-bishop of Frascati 1962-1973. Lentz, pp. 43-44.
  89. ^ Traglia also Cardinal-bishop of Albano 1972-1977. Lentz, p. 190.
  90. ^ Confalonieri was also Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1972-1986. Lentz, p. 48.
  91. ^ Rossi was a native of Joaquim Egidio, Brazil. He was also Cardinal-bishop of Sabina 1984-1995. Lentz, pp. 158-159.
  92. ^ Gantin was earlier Cardinal-bishop of Palestrina 1986-2008. Lentz, pp. 76-77.
  93. ^ A Bavarian, Ratzinger was also Cardinal-bishop of Velletri 1993-2005; he became Pope Benedict XVI)
  94. ^ Sodano is also Cardinal-bishop of Albano since 1994.

Books[edit]