Career woman

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A career woman is known as a woman whose main priority in life is achieving success in her career and profession.[1] These women can also be described as more interested in her career than in being married and having children.[2]

Women are seen[by whom?] as the caregivers for a family, and the men are seen as the ones that bring the bread to the table. Back in the old days, the "ideal" woman was seen as a trophy wife[disputed ]. A woman who was just a stay-at home-wife did the house chores and made sure to please the husband once he arrived from his long day of work[disputed ]. However, the "ideal" woman is changing throughout time. In today's society men view women with careers to be something great. From a study done by American Journal of Sociology, a majority of the men in today's era are looking for a woman who can economically pull her own weight in the relationships.[3][disputed ]

In the media, the glass ceiling is nothing else other than a joke to entertain those who believe that a woman place in society should be at home, being a housewife. Yet the portrayal of the glass ceiling in media brings media bias against women, manifested through multiple was through television.[neutrality is disputed][4] Throughout the findings of the research of the media films tend to portray women in a negative view to make them feel less than their male counterparts. The findings showed that film portrayals of career women are negative and stereotype-threatening characteristics, which included mean and conniving personalities, promiscuity, isolation, failures at intimacy and inability to balance work and family.[neutrality is disputed][4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "career girl | Definition, meaning & more | Collins Dictionary". www.collinsdictionary.com. Retrieved 2016-11-21. 
  2. ^ "career woman definition and synonyms | Macmillan Dictionary". www.macmillandictionary.com. Retrieved 2016-11-21. 
  3. ^ "11 Qualities of the Perfect Woman". Men's Health. 2012-12-09. Retrieved 2016-12-07. 
  4. ^ a b Ezzedeen, Souha (2015). "Portrayals of career women in Hollywood films: implications for the glass ceiling's persistence". Gender in Management. 30.3: 239–264 – via ProQuest Central.