Carl Adolph Agardh

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Carl Adolph Agardh

Carl Adolph Agardh (23 January 1785 in Båstad, Sweden – 28 January 1859 in Karlstad) was a Swedish botanist specializing in algae, who was eventually appointed bishop of Karlstad.

Biography[edit]

In 1807 he was appointed teacher of mathematics at Lund University, in 1812 appointed professor of botany and natural sciences,[1] and was elected a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1817, and of the Swedish Academy in 1831.

He was ordained a clergyman in 1816, received two parishes as prebend, and was a representative in the clerical chamber of the Swedish Parliament on several occasions from 1817. He was rector magnificus of Lund University 1819-1820 and was appointed bishop of Karlstad in 1835, where he remained until his death.[2] He was the father of Jacob Georg Agardh, also a botanist.[1]

Publications[edit]

He devoted considerable attention to political economy and as "a leading liberal", he "succeeded in improving and raising the standards of education in Sweden".[3] He also wrote on theological and other subjects, but his reputation chiefly rests on his botanical works, especially Systema algarum, Species algarum rite cognitae and Classes plantarum[4] on biological classification, and Icones Algarum (1824, 1820–28, and 1828–35). The greatest part of his Manual of Botany (2 vols., Malmoe, 1829–32) has been translated into German.[1]

Selected publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Wikisource-logo.svg Ripley, George; Dana, Charles A., eds. (1879). "Agardh, Karl Adolf". The American Cyclopædia. 
  2. ^ Eriksson, Gunnar (1970). "Agardh, Carl Adolph". Dictionary of Scientific Biography. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. pp. 69–70. ISBN 0-684-10114-9. 
  3. ^ PD-icon.svg Gilman, D. C.; Thurston, H. T.; Colby, F. M., eds. (1905). "Karl Adolph Agardh". New International Encyclopedia (1st ed.). New York: Dodd, Mead.  External link in |= (help)
  4. ^ Agardh 1825.
  5. ^ IPNI.  C.Agardh. 

External links[edit]

Cultural offices
Preceded by
Claes Fleming
Swedish Academy,
Seat No 4

1831-1859
Succeeded by
Fredrik Ferdinand Carlson
Religious titles
Preceded by
Johan Jacob Hedrén
Bishop of Karlstad
1835–1859
Succeeded by
Johan Anton Millén

Note: This is a selected list of the more influential systems. There are many other systems, for instance a review of earlier systems, published by Lindley in his 1853 edition, and Dahlgren (1982). Examples include the works of Scopoli, Batsch and Grisebach.