Carla Körbes

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Carla Körbes
Born1981/1982 (age 36–37)[1][2]
OccupationAssociate Artistic Director
Principal Dancer
Current groupL.A. Dance Project
Former groupsPacific Northwest Ballet New York City Ballet

Carla Körbes is a Brazilian ballet dancer who performed as a principal dancer with the Pacific Northwest Ballet.

Early training[edit]

Körbes was born in Porto Alegre, Brazil,[3] and grew up in São Leopoldo, taking classes at Ballet Vera Bublitz in Porto Alegre.[4] There she performed Balachine's Apollo with Peter Boal, who encouraged her to train in New York City.[5] In 1996, at the age of 15, she moved to the United States to enter into the School of American Ballet.[4]

Career[edit]

In 2000, Körbes joined New York City Ballet, SAB's parent company, as a member of the corps de ballet. She was promoted to the rank of soloist in 2005. Later that same year, she moved to Seattle to dance with the Pacific Northwest Ballet under the direction of Peter Boal[4] as a soloist.[5] She became a principal dancer in 2006.[3]

Körbes was named one of "25 to Watch" by Dance Magazine in 2006.[6] Alastair Macaulay, dance critic of the New York Times, has repeatedly singled out her performances for praise. In 2010, during a nationwide tour of the Nutcracker season, he stated that Körbes was the best dancer he had seen of the tour,[7] and in 2012, in a review of the Vail International Dance Festival, he stated that Körbes "is one of the finest ballerinas appearing in America today; some think her the finest, and last weekend I felt in no mood to contradict them."[8]

After announcing her retirement from PNB in September 2014,[9] Körbes gave a final performance on June 7, 2015.[10]

Following her final performance, Körbes accepted a position with the LA Dance Project as associate artistic director.[11]

In 2017 she joined the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music ballet faculty.[12][13]

Personal life[edit]

In April 2015 she married photographer Patrick Fraser and later that year gave birth to a baby boy.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kisselgoff, Anna (July 2, 2001). "BALLET REVIEW; New Queen Rules Over Balanchine's Magic Forest". The New York Times. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  2. ^ Scott, Kathy Lee (May 19, 2007). "Festival Ballet Theatre: 'Swan Lake'". Ballet-Dance Magazine. Archived from the original on February 14, 2012. Retrieved February 28, 2012.
  3. ^ a b "Carla Körbes" (Press release). Pacific Northwest Ballet. 2011. Retrieved December 31, 2011.
  4. ^ a b c Berardi, Gigi (February 2010). "Fearless in Seattle". Dance Magazine. Retrieved December 31, 2011.
  5. ^ a b Kourlas, Gia (1 February 2013). "Tales of Innocence, and Now Experience". New York Times. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  6. ^ "25 To Watch: Carla Körbes". Dance Magazine. January 2007. Archived from the original on February 14, 2012. Retrieved February 22, 2012.
  7. ^ Dannen, Laura (7 December 2010). "The New York Times Loves Carla Korbes". Seattle Met. Retrieved 31 December 2011. Referring to this article: Macaulay, Alastair (November 30, 2010). "Tales Within Tales Create a Tale of Two 'Nutcracker' Productions". The New York Times. Retrieved February 28, 2012.
  8. ^ Macaulay, Alastair (6 August 2012). "Surprises at Every Twirl". New York Times. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  9. ^ Kourlas, Gia (18 September 2014). "Carla Körbes, at 33, Announces Retirement From Ballet". New York Times. Retrieved 20 September 2014.
  10. ^ Macaulay, Alastair (9 June 2015). "Carla Körbes Grandly Bows Out of Pacific Northwest Ballet". New York Times. New York, United States. Retrieved 10 June 2015.
  11. ^ Sulcas, Roslyn (25 June 2015). "Carla Körbes Joins L.A. Dance Project". New York Times. New York, United States. Retrieved 30 June 2015.
  12. ^ "Kyra Nichols and Carla Korbes to join IU Jacobs School of Music ballet faculty:: Jacobs School of Music". info.music.indiana.edu. Retrieved 2018-06-27.
  13. ^ "Music News Home: Faculty: Current: Carla Korbes:: Jacobs School of Music". info.music.indiana.edu. Retrieved 2018-06-27.
  14. ^ "In Conversation with Carla Körbes". bachtrack.com. Retrieved 2018-09-12.