Carlos Antonio Carrillo

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Carlos Antonio Carrillo
Mexico Congress of the Union
In office
Governor of Alta California
In office
Preceded by Juan Bautista Alvarado
Succeeded by Juan Bautista Alvarado
Personal details
Born 24 Dec 1783
Santa Barbara, California
Died 23 February 1852(1852-02-23) (aged 68)
Santa Barbara, California
Spouse(s) Maria Josefa Raymunda Castro
Profession Politician, soldier
Religion Roman Catholic
Military service
Allegiance Mexico

Carlos Antonio Carrillo (24 December 1783 – 23 February 1852), was Governor of Alta California from 1837 to 1838. He took his oath as Governor in Pueblo de Los Angeles, present day Los Angeles, on December 6, 1836.[1] He was also the great-grandfather of actor Leo Carillo.

Carrillo was a Californio, one of the first children born at the Presidio of Santa Barbara (established 1782). His father, José Raimundo Carrillo, was a soldier who came north with the Portolá expedition in 1769 and served at the Presidio of Santa Barbara for twelve years.

From 1797 to 1825 Carlos Antonio served in the military at Monterey and Santa Barbara. As Alta California's delegate to the Mexican Congress of the Union, Carrillo pursued Alta California judicial reform, but his ideas were rejected.[2]

In 1836, Carrillo joined the rebellious Juan Bautista Alvarado in demanding a more autonomous Alta California, but internal dissension doomed the effort. In 1837, Carlos was appointed to replace Alvarado as governor, but Alvarado was able to reclaim the Governorship a year later.[3](pp. 260–61)

Mexican land grant - Channel Islands[edit]

Governor Manuel Micheltorena gave a Mexican land grant of Santa Rosa Island, in the Channel Islands of California, to Carlos and his brother José Antonio Carrillo in 1843. They later gave the island to Carlos' daughters, Manuela Carrillo Jones and Francisca Carrillo Thompson.[4]


  • Brother of José Antonio Carrillo (1796–1862)[1]
  • Father of Maria Josefa Carrillo, who married Captain William Goodwin Dana[1]
  • Father of Maria Encarnation Carrillo, who married Captain Thomas M. Robbins[5]
  • Grandfather of Juan José Carrillo (1842–1916)[1]
  • Great grandfather of Leo Carrillo (1880–1961)[1]
  • Father of Josef Gertrudis Carrillo 1810-1871, married three times [6]
  • Father of Maria Francisca Carrillo 1816-1841, who married Alpheus B Thompson 1798-1869[6]
  • Father of Pedro Catarino Carrillo 1817-1885, who married Maria Josefa Bandini 1821-1896[6]
  • Father of Manuela Antonia Carrillo 1810-1885, who married John Coffin Jones 1790-1850[6]
  • Father of Maria Antonia Carrillo 1822-1843, who married Luis T Burton 1812-1839 [6]
  • Father of Jose De Jesus Carrillo 1824-1864, married two times.[6]
  • Father of Maria Tomasa Carrillo 1827-1851 who married Luis T Burton 1812-1839 [6]
  • Father of Maria Edwiges Carrillo 1829-Unknown [6]


  1. ^ a b c d e Patricia Baker (1969). "The Bandini Family". Retrieved 2010-05-13. 
  2. ^ [Lands of Promise and Despair: Chronicles of Early California, 1535-1846, By Rose Marie Beebe, Robert M. Senkewicz, page 386
  3. ^ Richman, I. B. (1965). California under Spain and Mexico, 1535-1847: A contribution toward the history of the Pacific coast of the United States, based on original sources, chiefly manuscript, in the Spanish and Mexican Archives and other repositories. New York: Cooper Square Publishers. Google ebook
  4. ^, The Carrillos Played a Major Role in Santa Barbara’s History, October 26, 2010, By Michael Redmon
  5. ^, Carlos Antonio Carrillo
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h