Carlos Henry Bosdet

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Born Sept. 2, 1857.
Ericsson phone in the Palace Museum of Cortés in Cuernavaca, Morelos.

Carlos Henry Bosdet was an electrical engineer, born in 1857.[1] He was the first person to install and introduce the telephone in Mexico during President Porfirio Diaz's term in office.[2][3][4][5][6]

Biography[edit]

Carlos Henry Bosdet Fixott, born on September 2, 1857 in Nova Scotia, Canada but his parents were French.[7] After graduating from McGill University with a degree in electrical engineering, Carlos Henry Bosdet was hired by the Ericsson Telephone Company, and sent to Mexico.[7] He was sent to Mexico to install the first telephone line at the Chapultepec Castle National Palace on February 16, 1878 during the President Porfirio Diaz era. He stayed in Mexico, moving between different states to install telephone lines and by the end of the century there were five thousand units across Mexico. He is credited as bringing the first telephone lines to different states in Mexico, and prompted Ericsson Telephone Company, a Swedish company, to invest more in Mexico.

Carlos married Susan Miller who he met in Puebla, she was the daughter of an Englishman from Manchester England. He had three sons- Ernesto (1883), Carlos (1887) and Enrique (1893). He died in 1893, at the age of 36, as the result of complications from a bullfighting wound. His sons stayed in Mexico and some of his descendants continue to live in Mexico today.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1871 Canadian Census
  2. ^ CUERNAVACA, NOTIMEX/. "Rinden homenaje a introductor de teléfono en México". elsiglodetorreon.com.mx.
  3. ^ "Yahoo". Yahoo.
  4. ^ CUERNAVACA, NOTIMEX/. "Rinden homenaje a introductor de teléfono en México". elsiglodedurango.com.mx.
  5. ^ am, Periódico. "Periódico am". Periódico am.
  6. ^ MXCity (6 March 2016). "La primera llamada telefónica en México". mxcity.mx.
  7. ^ a b "Bosdet family history - theislandwiki". www.theislandwiki.org.
  8. ^ Insurgentepress Archived June 12, 2014, at the Wayback Machine.

External links[edit]