Carlos Lapetra

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Carlos Lapetra
Personal information
Full name Carlos Lapetra Coarasa
Date of birth (1938-11-29)29 November 1938
Place of birth Zaragoza, Spain
Date of death 24 December 1995(1995-12-24) (aged 57)
Place of death Zaragoza, Spain
Height 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in)
Playing position Forward
Youth career
SEU Madrid
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1958–1959 Guadalajara
1959–1969 Zaragoza 194 (38)
National team
1963–1966 Spain 13 (1)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Carlos Lapetra Coarasa (29 November 1938 – 24 December 1995) was a Spanish footballer who played as a forward.

He spent ten of his 11 years as a professional with Zaragoza, appearing in 279 official games (62 goals) and winning three major titles with the club.

A Spanish international during the 1960s, Lapetra represented the country at the 1964 European Nations' Cup and the 1966 World Cup, winning the former tournament.

Club career[edit]

Lapetra was born in Zaragoza, Aragon, as his parents had relocated to the city from Huesca due to the Spanish Civil War. After one year in the lower leagues with CD Guadalajara he signed with Real Zaragoza in 1959, remaining with the latter until his retirement.[1]

During his one-decade spell at the La Romareda, Lapetra was part of an attacking unit that also featured Canário, Marcelino, Eleuterio Santos and Juan Manuel Villa, dubbed Los Magníficos (The Magnificent).[2] He helped the club to four Copa del Rey finals in the 1960s, winning twice and scoring in both matches, against Atlético Madrid in 1964[3] and Athletic Bilbao in 1966.[4]

Lapetra retired from football at only 30, due to recurrent injury problems and as Zaragoza did not renew his contract. He settled in Huesca subsequently, working in directorial capacities with SD Huesca and the Spanish national team and dying on 24 December 1995 at the age of 57, due to cancer.[5]

International career[edit]

Lapetra earned 13 caps for Spain, during three years. He was part of the squads that appeared at the 1964 European Nations' Cup (starting in the 2–1 final win against the Soviet Union in the place of legendary Francisco Gento)[6][5] and the 1966 FIFA World Cup (featured in the 1–2 group stage loss to West Germany).[7]

International goals[edit]

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 27 October 1965 Sánchez Pizjuán, Seville, Spain  Republic of Ireland 4–1 4–1 1966 World Cup qualification[8]

Personal life[edit]

Lapetra's older brother, Ricardo, was also a footballer. He too played for Zaragoza, but with much less success.[9][5]

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

Zaragoza

International[edit]

Spain

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Carlos Lapetra, el beatle de los Magníficos" [Carlos Lapetra, the Magnificent Beatle]. Diario AS (in Spanish). 11 October 2005. Retrieved 27 April 2018. 
  2. ^ Miguel Gay (23 April 2014). "Los años Magníficos" [The Magnificent years]. Heraldo de Aragón (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 April 2018. 
  3. ^ a b "R. Zaragoza, 2 – At. de Madrid, 1". Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 6 July 1964. Retrieved 27 April 2018. 
  4. ^ a b "El Zaragoza conquistó brillantemente la Copa de S.E." [Zaragoza won the S.E. Cup brilliantly]. Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 30 May 1966. Retrieved 27 April 2018. 
  5. ^ a b c "Carlos Lapetra – El futbolista magnífico" [Carlos Lapetra – The magnificent footballer] (PDF) (in Spanish). Plan Aragón. Retrieved 14 March 2011. 
  6. ^ a b "Final del 64" [64 final]. El Mundo (in Spanish). 2004. Retrieved 27 April 2018. 
  7. ^ "España, 1 – Alemania, 2" [Spain, 1 – Germany, 2]. Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 21 July 1966. Retrieved 25 June 2013. 
  8. ^ "España, 4 – Irlanda, 1" [Spain, 4 – Ireland, 1]. Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 28 October 1965. Retrieved 27 April 2018. 
  9. ^ "Lapetra: Ricardo Lapetra Coarasa". BDFutbol. Retrieved 25 June 2013. 
  10. ^ "El Real Zaragoza, campeón de la Copa de Ferias en 1964" [Real Zaragoza, Fairs Cup champions in 1964]. Heraldo de Aragón (in Spanish). 25 June 2014. Retrieved 27 April 2018. 

External links[edit]