Carlos Ulrrico Cesco

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Carlos Ulrrico Cesco
Asteroids discovered: 19 [1]
1770 Schlesinger [A] May 10, 1967
1829 Dawson [A] May 6, 1967
1867 Deiphobus March 3, 1971
1917 Cuyo [B] January 1, 1968
1919 Clemence [C] September 16, 1971
1920 Sarmiento [C] November 11, 1971
1958 Chandra September 24, 1970
1991 Darwin [A] May 6, 1967
2308 Schilt [A] May 6, 1967
2399 Terradas June 17, 1971
2504 Gaviola [A] May 6, 1967
3833 Calingasta [C] September 27, 1971
5299 Bittesini June 8, 1969
5757 Tichá [A] May 6, 1967
8127 Beuf April 27, 1967
8128 Nicomachus [A] May 6, 1967
10450 Girard [A] May 6, 1967
11437 Cardalda [C] September 16, 1971
(30720) 1969 GB April 9, 1969
A with A. R. Klemola, B with A. G. Samuel, C with J. Gibson

Carlos Ulrrico Cesco (died 1987) was an Argentine astronomer. He lived most of his life in San Juan, Argentina. He was a well-known discoverer of minor planets credited by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) with the discovery of 19 numbered minor planets.[1][2]

The Carlos Ulrico Cesco Observatory is named after him (formerly known as the Félix Aguilar Observatory). His older brother, Ronaldo P. Cesco, was a mathematician and celestial mechanician and director of the La Plata Observatory.[2] They both studied at the Universidad de la Plata.

The outer main-belt asteroid 1571 Cesco, discovered by Miguel Itzigsohn at La Plata Observatory in 1950, was named after Carlos and Ronaldo Cesco.[2] The official naming citation was published by the MPC on 6 June 1982 (M.P.C. 6954).[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 20 June 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1571) Cesco. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 124. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  3. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 25 May 2017.