Carlstadt, New Jersey

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Carlstadt, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Carlstadt
Former firehouse, now home of the Carlstadt Historical Society
Former firehouse, now home of the Carlstadt Historical Society
Map highlighting Carlstadt's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Carlstadt's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Carlstadt, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Carlstadt, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°49′35″N 74°03′44″W / 40.826424°N 74.062338°W / 40.826424; -74.062338Coordinates: 40°49′35″N 74°03′44″W / 40.826424°N 74.062338°W / 40.826424; -74.062338[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated June 27, 1894
Named for Dr. Carl Klein
Government[8]
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
 • Mayor Craig J. Lahullier (R, term ends December 31, 2019)[3][4]
 • Operations manager Joe Crifasi[5][6]
 • Municipal clerk Claire Foy[7]
Area[1]
 • Total 4.243 sq mi (10.989 km2)
 • Land 3.999 sq mi (10.358 km2)
 • Water 0.244 sq mi (0.632 km2)  5.75%
Area rank 289th of 566 in state
18th of 70 in county[1]
Elevation[9] 13 ft (4 m)
Population (2010 Census)[10][11][12]
 • Total 6,127
 • Estimate (2016)[13] 6,249
 • Rank 339th of 566 in state
54th of 70 in county[14]
 • Density 1,532.1/sq mi (591.5/km2)
 • Density rank 332nd of 566 in state
63rd of 70 in county[14]
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC-4 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code 07072[15][16]
Area code(s) 201[17]
FIPS code 3400310480[1][18][19]
GNIS feature ID 0885180[1][20]
Website www.carlstadtnj.us

Carlstadt is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 6,127,[10][11][12] reflecting an increase of 210 (+3.5%) from the 5,917 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 407 (+7.4%) from the 5,510 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

Carlstadt was originally formed as a village by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 12, 1860, within Lodi Township. Most sources indicate that the community was named for Dr. Carl Klein, the leader of a group of early German settlers who led the project to establish the community[22][23] though Henry Gannett stated that the name derived from the city of Karlovac in Croatia, which was known as "Carlstadt" in German.[24] The Borough of Carlstadt was incorporated on June 27, 1894, formally set off from Bergen Township.[25][26] The borough was formed during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone.[27]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 4.243 square miles (10.989 km2), including 3.999 square miles (10.358 km2) of land and 0.244 square miles (0.632 km2) of water (5.75%).[1][2]

Carlstadt is bordered on the south by East Rutherford in Bergen County, Secaucus and North Bergen in Hudson County, on the north by Wood-Ridge and Moonachie (Bergen) to the east by Ridgefield and South Hackensack (Bergen), and to the northwest by Wallington (Bergen).[28] It is approximately 8 miles (13 km) northwest of New York City and 95 miles (153 km) northeast of Philadelphia.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18801,060
18901,54946.1%
19002,92088.5%
19103,80730.4%
19204,47217.5%
19305,42521.3%
19405,6444.0%
19505,591−0.9%
19606,0428.1%
19706,72411.3%
19806,166−8.3%
19905,510−10.6%
20005,9177.4%
20106,1273.5%
Est. 20166,249[13][29]2.0%
Population sources: 1880-1890[30]
1890-1920[31] 1890-1910[32]
1910-1930[33] 1900-2010[34][35][36]
2000[37][38] 2010[10][11][12]

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 6,127 people, 2,378 households, and 1,579 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,532.1 per square mile (591.5/km2). There were 2,495 housing units at an average density of 623.9 per square mile (240.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 81.41% (4,988) White, 2.38% (146) Black or African American, 0.16% (10) Native American, 8.23% (504) Asian, 0.07% (4) Pacific Islander, 5.35% (328) from other races, and 2.40% (147) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.02% (1,104) of the population.[10]

There were 2,378 households out of which 27.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.4% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.6% were non-families. 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.18.[10]

In the borough, the population was spread out with 20.2% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 28.6% from 25 to 44, 27.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.5 years. For every 100 females there were 95.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 92.1 males.[10]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $62,255 (with a margin of error of +/− $9,455) and the median family income was $71,506 (+/− $5,117). Males had a median income of $50,994 (+/− $7,494) versus $41,333 (+/− $6,468) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,403 (+/− $3,646). About 7.2% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.[39]

Same-sex couples headed 14 households in 2010, an increase from the 11 counted in 2000.[40]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 5,917 people, 2,393 households, and 1,593 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,496.4 people per square mile (578.4/km2). There were 2,473 housing units at an average density of 625.4 per square mile (241.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 88.90% White, 1.37% African American, 0.08% Native American, 6.19% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 2.13% from other races, and 1.32% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 7.99% of the population.[37][38]

There were 2,393 households out of which 25.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.9% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.4% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.04.[37][38]

In the borough the age distribution of the population shows 19.0% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 34.0% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 15.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.4 males.[37][38]

The median income for a household in the borough was $55,058, and the median income for a family was $62,040. Males had a median income of $46,540 versus $36,804 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,713. About 3.1% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.8% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[37][38]

Economy[edit]

Corporate residents include:

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Carlstadt is governed under the borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a mayor and a borough council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The borough council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[8] The borough form of government, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[44][45]

As of 2017, the mayor of Carlstadt is Republican Craig J. Lahullier, whose term of office ends December 31, 2019. Members of the Borough Council are Council President David Stoltz (R, 2019), Richard E. Bartlett (R, 2019), Joe Emerson (R, 2017), James Lenoy (R, 2017), William D. "Bill" Shockley (R, 2018) and Robert J. "Bob" Zimmermann (R, 2018).[3][46][47][48][49][50]

In January 2014, Joseph Emerson was appointed from among three nominees offered to fill the vacant seat of Dennis Ritchie that was scheduled to expire in December 2014.[51]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Carlstadt is located in the 9th Congressional District[52] and is part of New Jersey's 36th state legislative district.[11][53][54]

New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson).[55] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[56] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, 2019).[57][58]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 36th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Paul Sarlo (D, Wood-Ridge) and in the General Assembly by Gary Schaer (D, Passaic) and Clinton Calabrese (D, Cliffside Park).[59][60] Calabrese was sworn into office on February 8, 2018 to fill the seat of Marlene Caride, who had resigned from office on January 16, 2018 after being nominated to head the New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance.[61][62] The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy (D, Middletown Township).[63] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Sheila Oliver (D, East Orange).[64]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders. The freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year; a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore are selected from among its seven members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[65][66] As of 2018, the County Executive is Democratic James J. Tedesco III of Paramus, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018.[67] Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman Thomas J. Sullivan Jr., (D, Montvale, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder chairman ends 2018),[68] Freeholder Vice-Chairwoman Germaine M. Ortiz (D, Emerson, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder vice-chairwoman ends 2018),[69] Freeholder Chairman Pro-Tempore Mary J. Amoroso (D, Mahwah, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder chairman pro-tempore ends 2018),[70] David L. Ganz (D, Fair Lawn, 2020),[71] Steve Tanelli (D, North Arlington, 2018),[72] Joan Voss (D, Fort Lee, 2020)[73] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, Franklin Lakes, 2018),[74][75][76][65] Bergen County's constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale, 2021),[77][78] Sheriff Michael Saudino (D, Emerson, 2019)[79][80] and Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill, 2021).[81][82][65][83]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,420 registered voters in Carlstadt, of which 897 (26.2% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 734 (21.5% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 1,788 (52.3% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[84] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 55.8% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 70.0% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[84][85]

Presidential election results
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016[86] 50.9% 1,462 44.8% 1,289 4.3% 124
2012[87] 44.5% 1,165 54.0% 1,416 1.5% 39
2008[88] 52.2% 1,481 46.4% 1,316 1.3% 38
2004[89] 50.1% 1,414 48.8% 1,377 1.2% 33
2000[90] 42.6% 1,125 53.8% 1,420 3.6% 95
1996[90] 35.7% 979 50.9% 1,397 13.4% 368
1992[90] 49.2% 1,375 33.7% 942 17.1% 478
1988[90] 63.5% 1,924 36.1% 1,094 0.4% 12
1984[90] 68.4% 2,158 31.3% 986 0.3% 10
1980[90] 57.2% 1,648 33.7% 972 9.1% 263
1976[90] 60.1% 1,863 37.6% 1,166 2.3% 71
1972[90] 70.8% 2,306 27.4% 893 1.7% 56
1968[90] 53.5% 1,762 37.3% 1,228 9.2% 302
1964[90] 37.1% 1,146 62.7% 1,939 0.2% 7
1960[90] 59.5% 1,798 40.4% 1,221 0.2% 5

In the 2016 presidential election, Republican Donald Trump received 1,462 votes (50.9% vs. 41.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Hillary Clinton with 1,289 votes (44.8% vs. 54.2% countywide) and other candidates with 124 votes (4.3% vs. 4.6% countywide), among the 2,924 votes cast by the borough's 3,860 registered voters for a turnout of 75.7% (vs. 72.5% in Bergen County).[86] [91] In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,416 votes (53.5% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,165 votes (44.0% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 34 votes (1.3% vs. 0.9%), among the 2,646 ballots cast by the borough's 3,663 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.2% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[92][93] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,481 votes (51.9% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,316 votes (46.1% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 34 votes (1.2% vs. 0.8%), among the 2,854 ballots cast by the borough's 3,707 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.0% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[94][95] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,414 votes (49.7% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,377 votes (48.4% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 33 votes (1.2% vs. 0.7%), among the 2,845 ballots cast by the borough's 3,696 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.0% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[96]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 60.5% of the vote (997 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 38.1% (628 votes), and other candidates with 1.4% (23 votes), among the 1,694 ballots cast by the borough's 3,520 registered voters (46 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 48.1%.[97][98] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 942 votes (50.2% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 773 votes (41.2% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 115 votes (6.1% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 15 votes (0.8% vs. 0.5%), among the 1,878 ballots cast by the borough's 3,551 registered voters, yielding a 52.9% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[99]

Education[edit]

Public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade are served by the Carlstadt Public Schools. As of the 2015-16 school year, the district and its one school had an enrollment of 575 students and 42.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.7:1.[100] With the opening of the new Carlstadt Public School, which now serves all of Carlstadt's K-8 students, the Lincoln and Washington school sites have been turned over to the borough and plans have been developed to convert the sites to senior housing.[101]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend the Henry P. Becton Regional High School in East Rutherford, which serves high school students from both Carlstadt and East Rutherford as part of the Carlstadt-East Rutherford Regional School District.[102] As of the 2015-16 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 468 students and 38.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.1:1.[103]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[104][105]

Emergency services[edit]

Police[edit]

The Carlstadt Police Department is headed by Police Chief Thomas Nielsen. The department's first chief, Charles Schmidt, was appointed in 1907.[106]

Fire[edit]

The Carlstadt Fire Department (CFD) is an all-volunteer fire department. The CFD was organized in March 1872 and consists of one Chief, one assistant chief, one deputy chief and one battalion chief. The department is staffed by 80 fully trained firefighters. The CFD utilizes three engines, a ladder truck, a heavy rescue vehicle and a boat.[107] The Chief of the Department for 2017 is Stephen Capuano, Assistant Chief is Brian Cervasio, Deputy Chief is Henry Riveros, and Battalion Chief is Tony D'Amico.[108]

Ambulance[edit]

Emergency medical services are provided in the borough by the Carlstadt Volunteer Ambulance Corps (CVAC), established on January 1, 1974. The charitable organization has roughly 25 volunteer members on the roster (Emergency Medical Technicians and First Aiders). CVAC is led by a corps voted Captain and Lieutenant, and are managed by a Board of Officers composed solely of corps members. CVAC is part of NJ's First Aid Council, District 24. CVAC is based out of a borough-owned building at 424 Hackensack Street. They currently operate two Ford ambulances and a 2000 Ford Expedition utility vehicle, also owned by the Borough. CVAC responds to approximately 1500 emergency calls per year.[109]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 27.82 miles (44.77 km) of roadways, of which 21.48 miles (34.57 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.85 miles (4.59 km) by Bergen County and 1.36 miles (2.19 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 2.13 miles (3.43 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[110]

Route 120, County Route 503, and the western spur of the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95) serve Carlstadt. No interchange from the turnpike directly serves Carlstadt, but there is an entry and exit point for the Meadowlands Sports Complex. The 18W high-speed tollgate is located in the borough, but the nearest turnpike interchange is in East Rutherford.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit bus service is available to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 161, 163 and 164 routes; to Newark on the 76; and to other New Jersey communities served on the 703 and 772 routes.[111][112]

Carlstadt once had a rail station on the Hackensack and New York Railroad (later reformed as the New Jersey and New York Railroad), which closed in 1967, and was located on tracks that are used by NJ Transit's Pascack Valley Line.[113][114]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Carlstadt include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b U.S. Gazetteer Files for 2000, 2010 and 2012-2016, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2017.
  3. ^ a b Your Elected Officials, Borough of Carlstadt. Accessed May 23, 2017.
  4. ^ 2018 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed March 15, 2018.
  5. ^ Nicholaides, Kelly. "Former Bergen County DPW director appointed to two, part-time roles in Carlstadt", South Bergenite, January 8, 2015, backed up by the Internet Archive as of April 26, 2016. Accessed September 8, 2017. "The former Bergen County Public Works director Joe Crifasi, who left his DPW position with the borough in 2011 when he was hired by then County Executive Kathleen Donovan, has been hired by Carlstadt for two part-time positions.... As of the beginning of the year, Crifasi earns $75,000 as borough operations manager and $46,000 as director of public works operations for maintenance and equipment.... In addition to his DPW leadership duties, it is possible that Crifasi, in this new manager position, will serve as a replacement to the borough administrator role, which has been vacant for more than two years."
  6. ^ Grant, Meghan. "Carlstadt council terminates borough administrator on Black Friday", South Bergenite, November 28, 2012, backed up by the Internet Archive as of April 27, 2016. Accessed September 8, 2017. "The municipality is without a borough administrator following council action taken in a special meeting on Black Friday. Jane Fontana, the highest paid civilian borough employee, was terminated on Nov. 23."
  7. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Carlstadt. Accessed March 21, 2018.
  8. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 154.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Carlstadt, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Carlstadt borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 31, 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 14. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  12. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Carlstadt borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 31, 2012.
  13. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - 2016 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  14. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Carlstadt, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 12, 2011.
  16. ^ ZIP Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Carlstadt, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  18. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 8, 2017.
  20. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  21. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  22. ^ Van Valen, James M. History of Bergen County, New Jersey, p. 363, New Jersey Publishing and Engraving Co., 1900. Accessed July 5, 2011. "Papers of incorporation were executed February 24, 1854. The projector of the village was Dr. Carl Klein, and in honor of him the village was named Carlstadt."
  23. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 28, 2015.
  24. ^ Gannett, Henry. The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, p. 69. United States Government Printing Office, 1905. Accessed August 28, 2015.
  25. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 80. Accessed May 31, 2012.
  26. ^ History of Bergen County, p. 341
  27. ^ Harvey, Cornelius Burnham. Genealogical History of Hudson and Bergen Counties, New Jersey, p. 11, New Jersey Genealogical Publishing Company, 1900. Accessed September 1, 2013. "For a period of sixteen years following the passage of this act few boroughs were organized in the State, only three of them being in Bergen County.... As it was twenty-six boroughs were in the county from January 23, 1894, to December 18, of the same year."
  28. ^ Areas touching Carlstadt, MapIt. Accessed January 6, 2015.
  29. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  30. ^ Report on Population of the United States at the Eleventh Census: 1890. Part I, p. 238. United States Census Bureau, 1895. Accessed October 20, 2016.
  31. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 14, 2013.
  32. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed May 31, 2012.
  33. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed May 31, 2012.
  34. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 31, 2012.
  35. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed May 31, 2012.
  36. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County (1900-2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  37. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Carlstadt borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  38. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Carlstadt borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  39. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Carlstadt borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 31, 2012.
  40. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 3, 2013. Accessed September 27, 2014.
  41. ^ Beller, Peter C. "Bearing Gifts, Restoring the Temple Amid the Ruins Left by Katrina", The Forward, March 17, 2006. Accessed September 8, 2017. "There's even been an avalanche of blankets, sweaters, caps and gloves donated by 350,000 knitting enthusiasts who subscribe to a newsletter put out by the Lion Brand Yarn Company of Carlstadt, N.J."
  42. ^ Horyn, Cathy. "Pantone's Color of the Year Is...", The New York Times, December 20, 2007. Accessed September 8, 2008. "Nonetheless, Pantone's choice of blue iris, or No. 18-3943, got some news media attention last week, which seemed to be partly the objective of the company, which is based in Carlstadt, N.J."
  43. ^ "People/Business; Yoo-Hoo: A Carlstadt Success Story", The New York Times, March 2, 1975. Accessed September 8, 2017. "According to Dr. Max A. Geller, he became involved in the soft ‐drink industry 'largely by accident.' It happened in 1960, when he acquired control of the thenfledgling Yoo-Hoo Chocolate Beverage Corporation. Today, the Carlstadt-headquartered concern, whose principal product is a milkbased, noncarbonated chocolate drink, operates internationally."
  44. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  45. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  46. ^ 2016 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Carlstadt. Accessed May 23, 2017.
  47. ^ 2017 County and Municipal Directory, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed May 23, 2017.
  48. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote November 8, 2016, General Election, Bergen County, New Jersey, November 18, 2016. Accessed January 30, 2017.
  49. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote for November 3, 2015 General Election, Bergen County, New Jersey, December 2, 2015. Accessed January 3, 2015.
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