Carlyle Witton-Davies

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The Very Rev Carlyle Witton-Davies was an eminent Anglican priest[1] and scholar.[2]

He was born the son of T. Witton-Davies, Professor of Hebrew at the University College of North Wales, Bangor on 10 June 1913 and educated at Friars School, Bangor, University College of North Wales, Bangor, Exeter College, Oxford and Ripon College Cuddesdon.

He was ordained in 1938[3] and began his ecclesiastical career with a curacy at Buckley. From 1940 to 1944 he was Subwarden of St. Michael's College, Llandaff. From then until 1949 he was a Canon Residentiary at St. George's Cathedral, Jerusalem.[4] In that year he became Dean and Precentor[5] of St David's. His last senior post was as Archdeacon of Oxford ((1957–1982).[6]

One of the last clerics to wear the traditional frock coat and gaiters,[7] he died on 25 March 1993.

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Who was Who” 1897-2007 London, A & C Black, 2007 ISBN 978-0-19-954087-7
  2. ^ Amongst others he translated Martin Buber’s “Hasidism”, (1948) and “The Prophetic Faith” (1949); made major contributions to the “Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church” (1957 edition) and “The Mission of Israel”, 1963  ; and wrote “Journey of a Lifetime” > British Library website accessed 19:58 GMT 18 April 2011
  3. ^ Independent Obituary
  4. ^ Crockford's Clerical Directory1947-48 Oxford, OUP,1947
  5. ^ Although an ancient foundation, before 1840 the senior residentiary cleric was the Precentor, and not a Dean, due to a complication during the dissolution of the monasteries > “Eglwys Gadeiriol Tyddewi, 1181-1981 / St David’s Cathedral, 1181-1981” St David’s, Gwasg yr Oriel Fach, 1981 ISBN 0-905421-02-7
  6. ^ The Times, Wednesday, Dec 05, 1956; pg. 12; Issue 53706; col E New Archdeacon Of Oxford
  7. ^ The Times, Wednesday, Feb 25, 1970; pg. 10; Issue 57803; col E The Times Diary Saving the ecclesiastical gaiter
Religious titles
Preceded by
Albert William Parry
Dean of St David's
1949–1957
Succeeded by
Thomas Edward Jenkins