Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart of Los Angeles

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart of Los Angeles is a Roman Catholic religious institute of the Carmelite Order founded by Venerable Mother Maria Luisa Josefa of the Most Blessed Sacrament, also known as Mother Luisita.

About the Carmelite Sisters[edit]

The way of life of the Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart of Los Angeles is rooted in the Gospel, the Church, and the spirituality of Carmel as lived out through the charism of their foundress, Venerable Mother Maria Luisa Josefa of the Most Blessed Sacrament. Their mission statement is three-fold: "Educating for Life with the Mind and Heart of Christ” in schools; being “At the Service of the Family for Life” through eldercare; and “Fostering a Deeper Spiritual Life” through individual and group retreats.[1]

History[edit]

In the 1920s during the revolution and religious persecution in Mexico, Mother Luisita established schools, hospitals, and orphanages despite being scrutinized by the government. The very persecution which sought to destroy her work only spread it to another land when Mother Luisita and two companions entered the United States as religious refugees in 1927. They established roots in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

The community has grown since its humble beginnings with 3 sisters in 1927. Today, the Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart of Los Angeles has grown to 143 professed sisters.

Apostolic Work[edit]

Although most Carmelites are cloistered nuns, the Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart of Los Angeles are an active community combining the contemplative charism of Carmel and bringing this spirit out to the world through services in elder care, education and retreat work. They carry out this work at 13 sites located in the states of California, Arizona, Colorado and Florida, serving tens of thousands of people yearly.

Elder Care[edit]

Retreat Work[edit]

Education[edit]

Child Care Centers[edit]

Elementary Schools[edit]

High Schools[edit]

Carmelite Saints[edit]

Sources[edit]

  • Caterine, Darryl V. (2001). Conservative Catholicism and the Carmelites: Identity, Ethnicity, and Tradition in the Modern Church. Indiana University Press.

References[edit]

External links[edit]