Carmen A. Puliafito

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Carmen A. Puliafito
Dean headshot.ashx.jpg

Carmen A. Puliafito is an American ophthalmologist.

Career[edit]

Puliafito was born in Buffalo, New York. He has a degree in medicine from Harvard University and an MBA from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.[1]

After a career in medicine at various institutions, from 2001 to 2007 he was director of the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and chair of the department of ophthalmology.[1] Puliafito was appointed Dean of the Keck school in December 2007.[2] In 2012 he was 21st of the most highly-paid research university executives in the United States.[3] In March 2016, Puliafito resigned as Dean and USC professor Rohit Varma was appointed interim dean.[4]

He has served on the board of the Children's Hospital Los Angeles.[5]

Research[edit]

Puliafito was one of the inventors of optical coherence tomography (OCT);[6] for this work, James Fujimoto, Eric Swanson and Puliafito received a Rank Prize for Opto-electronics in 2002.[6] In 2012 Fujimoto, Swanson and David Huang, with Puliafito and Joel Schuman, received an António Champalimaud Vision Award from the Champalimaud Foundation.[7]

Puliafito participated in research into the use of bevacizumab for the treatment of retinal disorders.[8][9][10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Carmen Puliafito named new dean of the Keck School of Medicine. University of Southern California. Accessed February 2015.[self-published source]
  2. ^ USC Press Release. Dec 5 2007. USC Installs Dr. Carmen Puliafito as New Dean of the Keck School of Medicine
  3. ^ Alex Philippidis (Nov 18, 2013). "25 Top-Paid Research University Leaders". Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News.  Accessed February 2015.
  4. ^ Maamoon, Noorhan. "Dean of Keck School of Medicine of USC resigns". Daily Trojan. Retrieved 2016-04-03. 
  5. ^ http://www.chla.org/site/c.ipINKTOAJsG/b.5264283/
  6. ^ a b [s.n.] (May 2002). New Products. Optometry & Vision Science 79 (5): 279–280. Accessed February 2015.
  7. ^ 2012: Williams & Fujimoto, Huang, Puliafito, Schuman, Swanson. Champalimaud Foundation. Accessed February 2015.
  8. ^ Michels S, Rosenfeld PJ, Puliafito CA, Marcus EN, Venkatraman AS. (2005). Systemic bevacizumab (Avastin) therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration twelve-week results of an uncontrolled open-label clinical study. Ophthalmology 112:1035–47.
  9. ^ Rosenfeld PJ, Moshfegi AA, Puliafito CA. (2005). Optical coherence tomography findings after an intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (Avastin) for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Ophthalmic Surgery, Lasers & Imaging 36: 331–5.
  10. ^ Rich RM, Rosenfeld PJ, Puliafito CA, et al. (2006). Short-term safety and efficacy of intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Retina 26: 495–511.
  11. ^ Moshfegi AA, Rosenfeld PJ, Puliafito CA, et al. (2006). Systemic bevacizumab (Avastin) therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration: twenty-four-week results of an uncontrolled open-label clinical study. Ophthalmology 113: 2002–11.