Carole Jane Pachl

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Carole Jane Pachl
Personal information
Alternative names Carole Pedvis
Yarmila Pachl
Country represented  Canada
Born (1938-12-23) December 23, 1938 (age 78)
Prague, Czechoslovakia
Former coach Gus Lussi, Otto Gold, Arnold Gerschwiler
Skating club Minto Skating Club
Montreal WC
Training locations Ottawa, Ontario and Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Lake Placid, New York, USA; St. Moritz, Switzerland; England
Retired 1957

Carole Jane (Yarmila) Pachl, married surname: Pedvis, (born December 23, 1938) is a Canadian former figure skater. She is the 1957 North American silver medalist and a three-time Canadian national champion. She competed at the 1956 Winter Olympics.

Personal life[edit]

Carole Jane (Yarmila)[1] Pachl was born on December 23, 1938 in Prague, Czechoslovakia.[2] Her mother, Jarmila née Pošíková, was an actress,[3][4] while her father, Jan Pachl,[5] was a wealthy chocolate manufacturer.[6] Her brother, Rudy, was born a year later.[6] By this time, Nazi Germany had begun its occupation of Czechoslovakia and World War II ensued. Her father, having opposed the Nazis, was imprisoned in a concentration camp and then, following the war, had most of his assets seized by the Communists.[6]

Pachl and her mother resided for some time in England and St. Moritz, Switzerland, before the whole family moved to Montreal, Quebec, Canada. After becoming a naturalized Canadian citizen at age ten, four years ahead of the rest of her family, she moved to Lake Placid, New York, where she lived with an American family.[6]

Pachl married Len Pedvis.[4][5]

Career[edit]

Pachl enjoyed watching figure skating and began practicing seriously at the age of eight after her mother brought her before Swiss coach Arnold Gerschwiler in England.[6] In early 1947, she relocated to St. Moritz, Switzerland, where Gerschwiler continued coaching her.[6]

After her family moved to Canada, Pachl trained in Montreal. Her club's president sponsored her early Canadian citizenship so that she could be sent to Lake Placid, New York to train under Gus Lussi when she was ten years old.[6] She originally competed as Yarmila Pachl.[1]

Pachl represented Montreal WC until 1952–53 and then joined the Minto Skating Club in Ottawa.[7] She was coached by Otto Gold in Ottawa from around 1952.[6] In 1953, she became the Canadian national bronze medalist on both the junior and senior levels. She finished sixth at the 1953 North American Championships in Cleveland and eighth at the 1954 World Championships in Oslo, Norway.

In 1955, Pachl won her first national title and went on to place fourth at the North American Championships and sixth at the World Championships in Vienna. She repeated as the national champion the following season and was named in Canada's team to the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy, where she placed sixth.[8]

In 1957, her final competitive season, Pachl won her third national title and silver at the North American Championships. She finished fourth at the 1957 World Championships in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Results[edit]

International[7]
Event 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957
Winter Olympics 6th
World Championships 8th 6th 4th
North American Champ. 6th 4th 2nd
National[7]
Canadian Champ. 3rd 1st 1st 1st
Canadian Champ. 3rd J 3rd J 3rd J
J: Junior level

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Miss Morrow, Firstbrook Take Senior Skate Titles". Montreal Gazette. February 12, 1951. 
  2. ^ "Carole Jane Pachl". Sports Reference. 
  3. ^ Tejedor, Chrystian (August 25, 2006). "Jarmila Pachl, Movie Actress". Sun-Sentinel. 
  4. ^ a b "Jan PACHL". federationgenealogie.qc.ca. Archived from the original on 2016-04-30. 
  5. ^ a b "Jarmila PACHL". federationgenealogie.qc.ca. Archived from the original on 2016-04-30. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h "Carole Jane Pachl". Ottawa Citizen. December 3, 1955. Retrieved June 22, 2010. 
  7. ^ a b c "Skate Canada Results" (PDF). Skate Canada. 
  8. ^ Stepler, Jack (February 3, 1956). "Jack Frost Stealing Show At Olympics, Says Stepler". Southam News Services. Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved June 22, 2010.