Carolina Invernizio

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Carolina Invenizio
Carolina Invernizio.jpg
Born Carolina Maria Margarita Invernizio
28 March 1851 (1851-03-28)
Voghera, Italy
Died 27 November 1916 (1916-11-28) (aged 65)
Cuneo, Italy
Occupation Writer

Carolina Maria Margarita Invernizio (28 March 1851 - 27 November 1916), better known just as Carolina Invenizio, was an Italian novelist. She had a large popular success between late 1800s until her death.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Invenizio was born in Voghera, the daughter of an official of the Kingdom of Sardinia. She long credited her date of birth as 1858, but in 1983 after long researches in the municipal registers she eventually resulted to be born in 1851.[1]

In 1865 she moved with her family to Florence, where she studied at the Istituto Magistrale.[1]

Career[edit]

Invenizio made her writing debut in 1876, with the short story Un autore drammatico.[1] In 1877 she published her first novel, Rina o L'angelo delle Alpi.[1][2]

Invernizio wrote about 150 novels and 20 collections of novelle, as well as four books of fiction for children.[2] Influenced by feuilleton literature, she had an enormous popular following with her novels characterized by sensationalist, melodramatic and often gothic themes.[1][2] She was often badly received by critics, and Antonio Gramsci referred to her as an "old trooper" and a "honest hen", eventually regretting these remarks.[1][3]

Personal life[edit]

In 1881, aged 30 years old, Invenizio married a Bersaglieri lieutenant, Marcello Quinterno, and at 35 years old she had her only daughter, Marcella. She followed her husband during his deployments, moving to Turin and Cuneo, among other cities.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Giuseppe Zaccaria. "Invernizio, Carolina". Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani - Vol. 62. Treccani, 2004. 
  2. ^ a b c d Guido Davico Bonino. Donne allo specchio: I più bei racconti della letteratura italiana al femminile. Bur, 2015. ISBN 8858682386. 
  3. ^ Sharon Wood. Italian Women's Writing, 1860-1994. A&C Black, 1995. ISBN 0485910020. 

External links[edit]