Carpocoris purpureipennis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Carpocoris purpureipennis
Pentatomidae - Carpocoris purpureipennis-2.JPG
Carpocoris purpureipennis on Asphodel
Pentatomidae - Carpocoris purpureipennis (nymph).jpg
Nymph of Carpocoris purpureipennis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Hemiptera
Suborder: Heteroptera
Infraorder: Pentatomomorpha
Superfamily: Pentatomoidea
Family: Pentatomidae
Subfamily: Pentatominae
Genus: Carpocoris
Species: C. purpureipennis
Binomial name
Carpocoris purpureipennis
(De Geer, 1773)

Carpocoris purpureipennis is a species of shield bug belonging to the family Pentatomidae, subfamily Pentatominae.[1]

Subspecies[edit]

  • Carpocoris purpureipennis purpureipennis (De Geer, 1773)
  • Carpocoris purpureipennis sexmaculatus Péneau, 1921

Distribution and habitat[edit]

This species can be found in most of Europe and in central Asia.[2]

Habitat[edit]

These shield bugs live in meadows, roadsides, edges of forests and gardens.

Description[edit]

Carpocoris purpureipennis can reach a length of 11–13 millimetres (0.43–0.51 in).[3] The pronotum is wide with a regular punctuation, almost straight and slightly pointed lateral margins with blunt tips. Also the lateral edges of the scutellum are nearly straight.

The body color varies from purple or reddish-brown to yellowish. The pronotum angles are black. Moreover pronotum usually shows short longitudinal black stripes, while the scutellum may have some contrasting black spots. Antennae are black and legs are orange.[4]

This species is quite similar and can be confused with Carpocoris pudicus, Carpocoris fuscispinus and Carpocoris mediterraneus.[4]

Biology[edit]

Carpocoris purpureipennis

Both the adult bugs and their nymphs are polyphagous. Adults mainly feed on juices of Cirsium arvense and nectar of Leucanthemum vulgare.[3]

In late May-early June these insects lay eggs on various herbaceous plants of the family of cereals (Poaceae), legumes (Fabaceae), crucifers (Brassicaceae) and composites (Asteraceae).

These bugs are considered an agricultural pest. They can damage soybean, beans, cabbage, carrots, raspberries, strawberries, potatoes, radish, wheat and apple trees.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Rider D.A., 2004 - Family Pentatomidae - Catalogue of the Heteroptera of the Palaearctic Region

References[edit]

  1. ^ Biolib
  2. ^ Fauna europaea
  3. ^ a b Commanster
  4. ^ a b ROLAND LUPOLI, FRANÇOIS DUSOULIER, ASTRID CRUAUD, SANDRINE CROS-ARTEIL& JEAN-CLAUDE STREITO Morphological, biogeographical and molecular evidence of Carpocoris mediterraneus as a valid species (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae)

External links[edit]