Carrie (mango)

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Mango
Mango Carrie Asit fs8.jpg
A display of Carrie mango at the Redland Summer Fruit Festival, Fruit and Spice Park, Homestead, Florida
Genus Mangifera
Hybrid parentage 'Julie'
Cultivar 'Carrie'
Breeder Laurence H. Zill
Origin Florida, USA

The 'Carrie' mango is a named mango cultivar that originated in south Florida, USA.

History[edit]

The original tree was grown on the property of Laurence H. Zill in Boynton Beach, Florida and was reportedly a seedling of the 'Sophie Fry' mango. A pedigree analysis of the Florida mangoes conducted in 2005 that did not include 'Sophie Fry' instead the study found 'Julie' to be the most likely parent,[1] though 'Julie' is also the parent of 'Sophie Fry'. The 'Carrie' tree was named after Lawrence Zill's mother, Carrie Zill.[2] It first fruited in 1940[3] and commercial propagation began in 1949. Thereafter 'Carrie' gained a reputation for having excellent eating qualities and good disease resistance.[4] Its commercial application was limited due to the fruit's lack of color and soft flesh, but it became a popular dooryard variety in Florida.

'Carrie' trees are planted in the collections of the USDA's germplasm repository in Miami, Florida,[5][6] the University of Florida's Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, Florida,[7] and the Miami-Dade Fruit and Spice Park,[8] also in Homestead.

Description[edit]

The fruit is small, averaging a pound or less, and ripens from June to July in Florida. At maturity it may be green to yellow, but the fruit doesn't develop red blush like other mangoes. The flesh is not fibrous, is orange and rich in flavor with a strong aroma, and contains a monoembryonic seed.[9] The fruit are highly resistant to fungus.

'Carrie' trees can be vigorous growers, but their compact growth habit makes them easy to manage. They have dense, rounded canopies. The leaves are distinctive for being somewhat wider than most mango leaves.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cecile T. Olano; Raymond J. Schnell; Wilber E. Quintanilla; Richard J. Campbell (2005). "Pedigree analysis of Florida mango cultivars" (PDF) (118). Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc: 192–197. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-06-18. 
  2. ^ M.U. Mounts (1961). "History of Mangos and Other Tropical Fruits in Palm Beach County" (PDF) (74). Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc: 346–358. 
  3. ^ R. Bruce Ledin (1954). "Mango Varieties" (PDF) (67). Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc: 284–290. 
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-12-02. Retrieved 2010-11-14. 
  5. ^ http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/acc/display.pl?1081370 USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN). [Online Database] National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland.
  6. ^ http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/acc/display.pl?1575245 USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN). [Online Database] National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland.
  7. ^ http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/crane/pdfs/TREC-Fruit-Collections.pdf Page 3, #19
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-08-09. Retrieved 2011-09-28. 
  9. ^ Campbell, Richard J. (1992). A Guide to Mangos in Florida. Fairchild Tropical Garden. p. 43. ISBN 0-9632264-0-1. 

External links[edit]