Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Ann Johnson (born January 16, 1984, San Diego, California) is an American sprint canoer who has competed since the mid-2000s.

Career[edit]

Johnson was coached by Stein Jorgensen and competed in both 200 m and 500 m distances.[1][2] She trained in San Diego.[2]

She was a surprise qualifier for the US team for the Athens Olympics, and was the youngest member of the US's canoeing and kayaking team.[3][4] At the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, she was eliminated in the semifinals of both the K-1 500 m and the K-4 500 m events. In the K-4 500 m her teammates were Kathy Colin, Lauren Spaulding and Marie Mijalis.[4]

At the 2005 ICF Sprint Canoe World Championships, Johnson finished 8th in the K-1 500 m and 8th in the K-1 1000 m.[5]

At the 2006 ICF Sprint Canoe World Championships, Johnson finished 6th in the K-1 500 m and 7th in the K-1 1000 m.[6]

At the 2007 ICF Sprint Canoe World Championships, Johnson finished 4th in the K-1 1000 m and 5th in the K-1 500 m.[7]

She was the first US canoeist to qualify for the 2008 Summer Olympics, where she was eliminated in the semifinals of the K-1 500 m event.[1]

At the 2010 ICF Sprint Canoe World Championships, Johnson and her teammate Krisztina Fazekas-Zur finished 10th in the K-2 500 m event, winning the B-final.[8]

She was again the first US canoeist to qualify for the 2012 Summer Olympics, winning the K-1 500 m at the 2011 Pan American Games (she also won the K-1 200 m).[1][9] She went on to win the same event at the US Olympic trials in April 2012.[10] At the 2012 Summer Olympics, she reached the semi-final of the K-1 200 m, and the first round of the K-1 500 m.[11]

Personal life[edit]

Before she became a canoeist, she was a gymnast for ten years.[12] She discovered canoeing through a junior lifeguard programme.[12] The kayaking club was run by Chris Barlow, who had himself been an Olympian in 1992.[13] She had broken her arm doing gymnastics, and was looking for another sport to participate in.[2] She believes that the body control and strength she gained through gymnastics have helped her canoeing.[2]

Johnson competed at Olympic level despite being diagnosed with Crohn's Disease in 2003, and the disease causing her to miss both the 2003 and 2009 seasons.[1] The disease also led to her having to turn down a place at the 2003 Canoe World Championships.[12] After the 2012 Summer Olympics, she joined UC-Davis to study veterinary medicine having previously gained a biochemistry degree from UC-San Diego.[1] Her fiance is David Gubser, a Swiss kayaker.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Canoe/KayakYAK – 2012 U.S. Olympic Team – Media Guide" (PDF). US Canoe/Kayak. Retrieved 12 March 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Olympic Preview: Carrie Johnson (Kayaker)". USA Today. Retrieved 12 March 2016. 
  3. ^ "Kayaking: Carrie Johnson will get one last shot at Olympic medal". NewsOK.com. Retrieved 13 March 2016. 
  4. ^ a b "United States Canoeing at the 2004 Athina Summer Games | Olympics at Sports-Reference.com". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 13 March 2016. 
  5. ^ Dockbite. "Result archive | Sportscene". www.sportscene.tv. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 13 March 2016. 
  6. ^ Dockbite. "Result archive | Sportscene". www.sportscene.tv. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 13 March 2016. 
  7. ^ "Carrie Johnson". Team USA. Retrieved 13 March 2016. 
  8. ^ "Results of Canoe Regata – Malta". www.kayakpl.com. Retrieved 13 March 2016. 
  9. ^ "ICF – Canoeing News & Results from 2011 Pan-American Games". archived.canoeicf.com. Archived from the original on 12 March 2016. Retrieved 12 March 2016. 
  10. ^ "Paddling in London: Sprint National Team Trials Help USACK Team Take Shape for 2012 Games". Paddling Life. April 2012. Retrieved 13 March 2016. 
  11. ^ "Carrie Johnson". BBC News. 13 August 2012. Retrieved 13 March 2016. 
  12. ^ a b c Wharton, David (29 April 2012). "Carrie Johnson's biggest Olympic hurdle could be her health". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 12 March 2016. 
  13. ^ "Carrie Johnson to kayak at Beijing Olympics". La Jolla Light. Retrieved 13 March 2016. 

External links[edit]