Carroll C. Hincks

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Carroll Clark Hincks (November 30, 1889 – September 30, 1964) was a United States federal judge from the state of Connecticut. He sat on the federal bench for 28 years: 22 on the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut and six on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Hincks was born on November 30, 1889, in Andover, Massachusetts.[2] His parents were Edward Hincks (who was on the faculty of Andover Theological Seminary) and Elizabeth Tyler Clark (the daughter of Charles P. Clark, former president of the New Haven Railroad).[1]

Hincks graduated from Phillips Andover Academy.[1] He received his A.B. from Yale College in 1911 and his LL.B. from Yale Law School in 1914.[2]

Career[edit]

Hincks was admitted to the bar and then practiced as a lawyer in Connecticut (in New Haven from 1914 to 1916, then in Waterbury from 1919 to 1931 at the firm of Meyer, Hincks & Traurig).[1][2] His time in private practice was interrupted by two years overseas as a U.S. Army artillery officer during World War I.[1][2] Hincks also served as an artillery officer in the Border Campaign of 1916.[1]

On December 15, 1931, Hincks was nominated by President Herbert Hoover to the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut, to the seat vacated by Warren B. Burrows.[2] He was confirmed by the Senate on January 13, 1931, and received commission on January 24, 1931.[2] Hincks served on that court for 22 years, including a term as chief judge from 1948 to 1953.[2] Among his most notable cases on the district bench was the reorganization of the New Haven Railroad (1935–47).[1]

In 1953, President Dwight D. Eisenhower elevated Hincks to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, succeeding Thomas Walter Swan. Hincks took office under a recess appointment on October 3, 1953 (to a seat vacated by Thomas Walter Swan) and was renominated by Eisenhower on January 11, 1954.[2] He was confirmed by the Senate on February 9, 1954.[2]

According to his obituary in the New York Times, "Judge Hincks was active in Yale University affairs."[1] He served as secretary of the committee charged with constructing the Yale Bowl and was active in Mory's.[1]

Later life and death[edit]

Hincks took senior status in 1959. He died in 1964, at the age of 74, at the Grace‐New Haven Community Hospital in New Haven.[1][2]

He was survived by his wife, Edith Walker Ney Hincks, and two sisters.[1]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Warren Booth Burrows
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut
1931–1953
Succeeded by
Robert P. Anderson
Preceded by
post established
Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut
1948–1953
Succeeded by
J. Joseph Smith
Preceded by
Thomas Walter Swan
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
1953-1959
Succeeded by
J. Joseph Smith