Carver County, Minnesota

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Carver County, Minnesota
Map of Minnesota highlighting Carver County
Location in the U.S. state of Minnesota
Map of the United States highlighting Minnesota
Minnesota's location in the U.S.
Founded February 20, 1855[1]
Named for Jonathan Carver
Seat Chaska
Largest city Chaska
Area
 • Total 376 sq mi (974 km2)
 • Land 354 sq mi (917 km2)
 • Water 22 sq mi (57 km2), 5.8%
Population (est.)
 • (2016) 100,262
 • Density 257/sq mi (99/km²)
Congressional districts 3rd, 6th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.carver.mn.us

Carver County is a county in the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of the 2010 census, the population was 91,042.[2] Its county seat is Chaska.[3] Carver County is named after the explorer Jonathan Carver, who in 1766-67, traveled from Boston to the Minnesota River, and wintered among the Sioux near the site of New Ulm.[4]

Carver County is part of the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 376 square miles (970 km2), of which 354 square miles (920 km2) is land and 22 square miles (57 km2) (5.8%) is water.[5] It is Minnesota's second-smallest county by land area and third-smallest by total area.

Native vegetation based on NRCS soils information[6]
Soils of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum area

Carver is one of seven southern Minnesota counties with no forest soils; only prairie ecosystems of savannas and prairies can be found in Carver County. It is also one of 17 Minnesota counties where savanna soils dominate.

Lakes[edit]

Lake Waconia

Carver County is home to seven lakes, 235 acres or larger. Carver's largest and most notable lake is Waconia Lake. The lake is Minnesota's 73rd largest lake and the Twin Cities' second largest lake, with an area of 2,996 acres.[7]

Township Lakes
Benton Township Barlous Lake, Benton Lake, Maria Lake, Meuwissen Lake, Myers Lake, Rice Lake, Winkler Lake
Camden Township Berliner Lake, Eagle Lake, Smith Lake
Dahlgren Township Aue Lake
Hancock Township Assumption Lake, Gaystock Lake, Maria Lake, Miller Lake,
Hollywood Township Lippert Lake
Laketown Township Carl Krey Lake, Lake Auburn, Lake Virginia, Lake Waconia, Lake Zumbra, Lunsten Lake, Marsh Lake, Parley Lake, Piersons Lake, Reitz Lake, Schutz Lake, Stieger Lake, Sunny Lake, Turbid Lake, Wasserman Lake
San Francisco Township Hallquist Lake, Kelly Lake, Long Lake, Scott Lake,
Waconia Township Burandt Lake, Donders Lake, Goose Lake, Hydes Lake, Lake Minnewashta, Lake Patterson, Lake Waconia, Rutz Lake, Swan Lake
Watertown Township Buck Lake, Goose Lake, Lippert Lake, Mud Lake, Oak Lake, Swede Lake
Young America Township Barnes Lake, Brand Lake, Braunworth Lake, Tiger Lake, Young America Lake

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Climate and weather[edit]

In recent years, average temperatures in the county seat of Chaska have ranged from a low of 4 °F (−16 °C) in January to a high of 81 °F (27 °C) in July, although a record low of −41 °F (−41 °C) was recorded in January 1970 and a record high of 105 °F (41 °C) was recorded in July 1988. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 0.66 inches (17 mm) in February to 5.05 inches (128 mm) in August.[8]

Climate chart for Carver County, Minnesota
Chaska, Minnesota
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
0.7
 
 
22
4
 
 
0.7
 
 
28
9
 
 
1.7
 
 
40
21
 
 
2.5
 
 
57
34
 
 
3.7
 
 
69
46
 
 
4.6
 
 
78
56
 
 
3.5
 
 
81
60
 
 
5.1
 
 
78
58
 
 
3.4
 
 
71
49
 
 
2.5
 
 
58
36
 
 
1.6
 
 
41
23
 
 
1
 
 
26
8
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[8]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 5,106
1870 11,586 126.9%
1880 14,140 22.0%
1890 16,532 16.9%
1900 17,544 6.1%
1910 17,455 −0.5%
1920 16,946 −2.9%
1930 16,936 −0.1%
1940 17,606 4.0%
1950 18,155 3.1%
1960 21,358 17.6%
1970 28,331 32.6%
1980 37,046 30.8%
1990 47,915 29.3%
2000 70,205 46.5%
2010 91,042 29.7%
Est. 2016 100,262 [9] 10.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2016[2]
Age pyramid of county residents based on 2000 U.S. census data

2010[edit]

The ethnic makeup of the county, according to the 2010 census, was the following:

There were 33,486 households out of which 42.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.9% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.9% were non-families. 21.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.22.

The median income for a household in the county was $83,773, and the median income for a family was $96,913. Males had a median income of $66,150 versus $46,696 for females. The per capita income for the county was $37,457. About 3.3% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.5% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over.[14]

2000[edit]

As of the 2000 census, there were 70,205 people, 24,356 households, and 18,778 families residing in the county. The population density was 197 people per square mile (76/km²). There were 24,883 housing units at an average density of 70 per square mile (27/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.95% White, 0.59% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 1.56% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.87% from other races, and 0.82% from two or more races. 2.55% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 44.3% were of German, 12.1% Norwegian, 7.1% Irish and 6.2% Swedish ancestry.

There were 24,356 households out of which 45.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.40% were married couples living together, 7.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.90% were non-families. 18.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the county, the population was spread out with 31.50% under the age of 18, 6.90% from 18 to 24, 34.70% from 25 to 44, 19.50% from 45 to 64, and 7.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 100.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $65,540, and the median income for a family was $73,577 (these figures had risen to $78,035 and $89,100 respectively as of a 2007 estimate). Males had a median income of $47,271 versus $32,107 for females. The per capita income for the county was $28,486. About 2.30% of families and 3.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.60% of those under age 18 and 6.90% of those age 65 or over.

Government and politics[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 52.2% 29,056 38.6% 21,508 9.2% 5,132
2012 58.9% 31,155 39.2% 20,745 1.9% 999
2008 56.7% 28,156 41.6% 20,654 1.8% 873
2004 62.8% 28,510 36.2% 16,456 1.0% 445
2000 59.4% 20,790 35.6% 12,462 5.1% 1,769
1996 44.0% 12,380 41.0% 11,554 15.0% 4,234
1992 38.3% 10,201 31.4% 8,349 30.3% 8,054
1988 59.2% 12,560 39.8% 8,439 1.1% 229
1984 63.6% 11,963 35.8% 6,725 0.6% 121
1980 53.6% 9,909 35.8% 6,621 10.6% 1,951
1976 50.2% 8,199 46.3% 7,574 3.5% 574
1972 61.5% 8,546 34.9% 4,852 3.7% 507
1968 56.4% 6,649 39.0% 4,590 4.6% 541
1964 51.4% 5,424 48.5% 5,123 0.1% 11
1960 60.9% 6,231 38.9% 3,982 0.1% 14
1956 72.5% 6,226 27.2% 2,334 0.3% 29
1952 75.4% 6,674 24.4% 2,159 0.2% 15
1948 61.2% 4,582 37.6% 2,816 1.1% 84
1944 78.4% 5,823 21.1% 1,565 0.5% 39
1940 78.6% 6,528 21.1% 1,753 0.3% 22
1936 42.4% 3,095 38.6% 2,814 19.0% 1,383
1932 36.3% 2,508 62.7% 4,328 1.0% 66
1928 57.7% 3,983 41.8% 2,885 0.5% 33
1924 40.2% 2,214 6.5% 358 53.3% 2,936
1920 87.3% 5,073 9.7% 562 3.0% 175
1916 65.6% 1,950 32.3% 960 2.2% 64
1912 26.9% 742 36.5% 1,008 36.6% 1,012
1908 60.0% 1,739 38.0% 1,101 2.0% 57
1904 70.4% 1,735 27.3% 672 2.3% 56
1900 59.5% 1,775 38.4% 1,146 2.0% 60
1896 58.3% 1,856 39.8% 1,268 2.0% 62
1892 40.4% 1,191 49.5% 1,462 10.1% 299

Government[edit]

Like all counties in Minnesota, Carver is governed by an elected and nonpartisan board of commissioners. Each commissioner represents a district of approximately equal population.

County commissioners[edit]

The county commission elects a chair who presides at meetings. Commissioners as of July 2015:

District Commissioner In office since Current term expires on Dec. 31 of
1st Gayle O. Degler 2002 2016
2nd Tom Workman 2002 2018
3rd Randy Maluchnik 2006 2016
4th Tim Lynch 2004 2018
5th James Ische 1996 2016

Politics[edit]

Carver County has long been known as a Republican stronghold in state and federal elections. Since World War II, the county has never voted for a Democratic candidate for president. The last time Carver County voted for a Democrat was in 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt's landslide win against incumber Herbert Hoover,[16] and the only other occurrence since 1896 was Woodrow Wilson in 1912, when the Republicans were bitterly divided. Since 1944, the only time Carver County voted for a non-Republican candidate in a gubernatorial race was in 1998, Jesse Ventura’s historic third party upset.[17]

Carver County is divided into two congressional districts. While the eastern area, adjacent to Hennepin County and Scott County, is represented by Minnesota's 3rd congressional district (CPVI R+2) and the remainder of the county is represented by Minnesota's 6th congressional district (CPVI R+10).

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost town[edit]

Notable residents[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Minnesota Place Names". Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 31, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 70. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 6, 2014. Retrieved October 6, 2014. 
  6. ^ Nelson, Steven (2011). Savanna Soils of Minnesota. Minnesota: Self. pp. 49 - 52. ISBN 978-0-615-50320-2.
  7. ^ http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/lakefind/showreport.html?downum=10005900
  8. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Chaska, Minnesota". The Weather Channel. Retrieved 2011-11-06. 
  9. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 22, 2013. Retrieved October 6, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved October 6, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 6, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 6, 2014. 
  14. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/27/27019.html
  15. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  16. ^ Sullivan, Robert David; ‘How the Red and Blue Map Evolved Over the Past Century’; America Magazine in The National Catholic Review; June 29, 2016
  17. ^ http://www.leg.state.mn.us/lrl/mngov/electionresults.aspx

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°49′N 93°48′W / 44.82°N 93.80°W / 44.82; -93.80