Cascade mountain wolf

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Cascade Mountains wolf
Dogs, jackals, wolves, and foxes (Plate IV) C. l. fuscus mod.jpg
Illustration based on a description by Edward Alphonso Goldman
Extinct  (1940)
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Canidae
Genus: Canis
Species:
Subspecies:
C. l. fuscus
Trinomial name
Canis lupus fuscus
Richardson 1839[1]
North American gray wolf subspecies distribution according to Goldman (1944) & MSW3 (2005).png
Historical and present range of gray wolf subspecies in North America
Synonyms[2]
  • gigas (Townsend, 1850)

The Cascade Mountains wolf (Canis lupus fuscus) is an extinct subspecies of the gray wolf that was once found in British Columbia, Oregon, and Washington.[3] The wolf became extinct in 1940.[3] It was originally identified as a separate species by Richardson in 1839[4] and from other wolves in the area by Edward Goldman in 1945.[5] This wolf is recognized as a subspecies of Canis lupus in the taxonomic authority Mammal Species of the World (2005).[6] It was described as a cinnamon-coloured wolf, measuring 165 cm and weighing 36–49 kg.[7]

Recently another subspecies, the British Columbia wolf (Canis lupus columbianus), has established itself in the Cascade mountain wolf's past territory by following the Cascade Range through Washington and is now west of the Cascade crest, expanding across Oregon, and into northern California to Lassen Peak, where in 2019 the Lassen pack produced 3 wolf pups.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Canis lupus fuscus Richardson, 1839" – ITIS Report
  2. ^ Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Order Carnivora". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 532–628. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
  3. ^ a b Charles Bergman (2003). Wild Echoes: Encounters With the Most Endangered Animals in North America. University of Illinois Press. pp. 256–. ISBN 978-0-252-07125-6.
  4. ^ Joshua Ross Ginsberg; David David Whyte Macdonald (1990). Foxes, Wolves, Jackals, and Dogs: An Action Plan for the Conservation of Canids. IUCN. pp. 6–. ISBN 978-2-88032-996-9.
  5. ^ Barry Lopez (2004). Of Wolves and Men. Simon and Schuster. pp. 13–. ISBN 978-0-7432-4936-2.
  6. ^ Wozencraft, W.C. (2005). "Order Carnivora". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 575–577. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. url=https://books.google.com/books?id=JgAMbNSt8ikC&pg=PA576
  7. ^ The Encyclopedia of Vanished Species by David Day, Universe Books ltd. 1981. ISBN 0-947889-30-2