Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza, Belluno e Ancona

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Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza, Belluno e Ancona
Cariverona Banca
Formerly
  • Civica Cassa di Risparmio di Verona
  • Cassa di Risparmio di Verona
  • Cassa di Risparmio di Verona e Vicenza
  • Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza e Belluno
Successor
Founded
  • 1825 in Verona[1]
  • 1991 (as S.p.A.)
Defunct1 July 2002
Headquarters
Verona
,
Italy
Number of locations
Increase 501[2](2000)
Increase 513[3]:31(2001)
00 €322 million(2000)
Increase €392 million[3]:97(2001)
Total equity
00 €1.879 billion[2](2000)
Increase €2.022 billion[3]:156(2001)
OwnerUniCredit (99.77%)[3]:156
Number of employees
Increase 5,083 (2000)
ParentUniCredit
Subsidiaries
Cariverona Ireland(075%)
Gestiveneto SGR(100%)
Quercia Software(100%)
Websitewww.cariverona.it
Footnotes / references
source:[2][3] 2000 financial figures was originally in Italian lira, but at that time already pegged with euro

Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza, Belluno e Ancona known as Cariverona in short, was an Italian savings bank headquartered in Verona. In 1991, due to Legge Amato [it], the bank was split into two organizations,[4] Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza, Belluno e Ancona S.p.A. (trading as Cariverona Banca) and Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza, Belluno e Ancona. They joined Unicredito banking group as founding subsidiary and shareholder respectively. The banking foundation was a minority shareholder of the successor of the banking group UniCredit.

Predecessor[edit]

Monte di Pietà di Verona[edit]

Photo of Piazza Monte, Verona by Moritz Lotze [it], 1886[5]

Monte di Pietà di Verona is a mount of piety (Italian: monte di pietà) founded in 1490,[6] by the Franciscan Michele da Acqui[7][8] in the Republic of Venice, 28 years after the first recorded mount of Italy was founded in Perugia, by other Franciscans, Bernardine of Feltre and Michele Carcano, in the Papal States.[9] The mount was later known as Monte di Credito su Pegno di Verona since 1930s. Despite as the founder of the saving banks of Verona, the mount and the bank became separate entities until 1947, which the mount was merged back to the savings bank.[10] The building of the mount located on 1 Piazzetta Monte was used as the headquarters of the banking foundation of the saving bank in from 1993 to 1999.[6]

History[edit]

Civica Cassa di Risparmio di Verona was founded in 1825 in Verona in the Kingdom of Lombardy–Venetia of the Austrian Empire as a division of the local mount of piety.[6] In 1892, the bank was independent[6] from the mount of piety. The mount was merged with Cariverona in 1947.

Cassa di Risparmio di Verona merged with other banks in Veneto region in 1927–28, due to a decree-law to consolidate savings banks that were too small.[6][11] (law no.2587 of 1927[12]) It was renamed to Cassa di Risparmio di Verona e Vicenza in 1927 and Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza e Belluno in 1939.[6] Notable entities that were absorbed in 1927–28, were Cassa di Risparmio di Vicenza (founded in 1822),[6] Cassa di Risparmio di Legnago (founded in 1893; merged in 1927),[6] Cassa di Risparmio di Bassano del Grappa (founded in 1912; merged in 1928),[6] Banca del Monte di Feltre,[6] and Cassa di Risparmio di Cologna Veneta,[6][13] all from the provinces of Verona, Vicenza and Belluno, as well as either mount of piety and/or savings bank origins; Monte di Credito su Pegno di Belluno was absorbed by Cariverona in 1948,[14] followed by the counterpart in Bassano del Grappa in 1955.[15] In 1946, the assets and liabilities of a rural credit union, Cassa Rurale e Artigiana di Isola Rizza, was also acquired by the bank.[10]

Verona, Vicenza and Belluno were the three provincial capitals of Veneto region; in the other 4 provincial capitals, they have separate savings banks, which except Treviso (Cassa di Risparmio della Marca Trivigiana, a predecessor of UniCredit along with Cariverona), were the predecessors of Intesa Sanpaolo (Cassa di Risparmio di Padova e Rovigo and Cassa di Risparmio di Venezia)

In 1989, the bank merged with Cassa di Risparmio di Ancona of Marche region to become Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza, Belluno e Ancona.[16][17] According to La Repubblica, the bank was the fourth largest savings bank (Italian: cassa di risparmio) of Italy at that time.[16] A report by Mediobanca, shown the bank was ranked 20th by total client deposits (Italian: raccolta da clientela; total deposits excluding inter-bank deposit) in 1988, among all type of commercial banks;[18] in terms of savings bank, behind Cassa di Risparmio delle Provincie Lombarde (Cariplo), Cassa di Risparmio di Torino (Banca CRT) and Cassa di Risparmio di Roma.[18] Cariplo was a predecessor of Intesa Sanpaolo banking group (known as Banca Intesa), while Banca CRT later joined Unicredito, which along with Cariverona, was the founding subsidiaries of UniCredito Italiano (now UniCredit) in 1998; Cassa di Risparmio di Roma was a predecessor of Capitalia, which was acquired by UniCredit in 2007.

Cariverona Banca S.p.A.[edit]

In December 1991, due to Legge Amato [it], the bank was split into two organizations, a società per azioni and a banking foundation (Italian: fondazione). The former continued the banking activities, while the latter inherited the legal person and charity activities.

The bank (now the S.p.A.) and the foundation were the founder of Unicredito banking group as subsidiary and shareholder respectively in 1994.[1] The other member of the group was Cassa di Risparmio della Marca Trivigiana (Cassamarca) and its banking foundation Fondazione Cassamarca.

According to the Bank of Italy figures, in term of market share in deposit (Italian: quote di mercato dei depositi), before the merger of Cariverona (Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza, Belluno e Ancona), and Cassamarca, they also had a significant market share in their home province(s). For Cariverona, it was 38.35% in the Province of Verona, 25.23% in Vicenza and 55.11% in Belluno in 1994; the figure in the Province of Ancona was not stated.[19]

In 1996, the business of a minor bank (a former mount of piety), Monte di Credito su Pegno di Vicenza S.p.A. was acquired from its banking foundation Fondazione Monte di Pietà di Vicenza.[20][21]

According to Italian Competition Authority (AGCM), quoting the figures from the Bank of Italy, Unicredito (presented as Cariverona in Marche region) was one of the major banking group of the Province of Ancona in 1996 (the third after Banca delle Marche and Banca Popolare di Bergamo), in term of market share of deposits (Italian: depositi) of 11%.[22]

In 1997, the bank sold the equity interests (12.6%) in Banco Ambrosiano Veneto to Fondazione Cariplo,[23] the parent company of Cassa di Risparmio delle Provincie Lombarde (Cariplo); in the next year Cariplo and Banco Ambrosiano Veneto merged to form Banca Intesa, a predecessor and one of the major competitor of UniCredit, Intesa Sanpaolo. In the same year Cassa di Risparmio di Torino also joined Unicredito group.

After Unicredito group merged with Credito Italiano in 1998, the foundation still owned 16.532% shares of UniCredit (known as UniCredito Italiano at that time) at 31 December 2001, as the largest shareholder.[2]:106

On 1 July 2002, Cariverona Banca was merged with other sub-brand and subsidiaries of the banking group to form UniCredit Banca and other divisions of UniCredit.

Subsidiaries[edit]

As of 31 December 2001

Equity investments[edit]

As of 31 December 2001[3]:258–264
former

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "La nostra storia" [Our story] (in Italian). Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza, Belluno e Ancona. Archived from the original on 7 October 1999. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Bilancio Consolidato di Gruppo dell'esercizio 2000" (PDF) (in Italian). UniCredit. 2001. Retrieved 9 November 2017 – via Borsa Italiana.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Bilancio Consolidato di Gruppo dell'esercizio 2001" (PDF) (in Italian). UniCredit. 2002. Retrieved 9 November 2017 – via Borsa Italiana.
  4. ^ Ministry of Treasury (24 January 1992). "Approvazione del progetto di ristrutturazione presentato dalla Cassa di risparmio di Verona, Vicenza, Belluno e Ancona". Gazzetta Ufficiale (in Italian). Rome. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  5. ^ Borelli, Giorgio; Bruni, Giuseppe; Castiglioni, Gino (2002). La Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Verona Vicenza Belluno e Ancona nel decennale della costituzione 1991−2001 (PDF) (in Italian). Verona: Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Verona Vicenza Belluno e Ancona.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Origine ed evoluzione della Fondazione" [Origin and evolution of foundation] (in Italian). some content were derived from "La Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Verona Vicenza Belluno e Ancona nel decennale della costituzione 1991−2001". Fondazione Cariverona. Archived from the original on 23 September 2010. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  7. ^ Lodi, Stefano. "Verona (1490)" (in Italian). Bologna: Fondazione del Monte di Bologna e Ravenna. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  8. ^ "Michele Pevere". Treccani (in Italian). Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  9. ^ Toaff, Ariel (2004). "Jews, Franciscans, and the First Monti di Pietà in Italy (1462–1500)". In McMichael, Steven J.; Myers, Susan E. Friars and Jews in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Leiden: Koninklijke Brill. p. 239. Retrieved 23 November 2017 – via UWA ebook collection. (Subscription required (help)).
  10. ^ a b http://bd01.leggiditalia.it/rtf01/255040_25.pdf
  11. ^ "Regio decreto-LEGGE 10 febbraio 1927, n. 269" (PDF). Gazzetta Ufficiale (in Italian). 68 (58). Rome. 11 March 1927 [written on 10 February 1927; digitized on 15 November 2008]. pp. 1067–1070 – via Agenzia per l'Italia Digitale.
  12. ^ "LEGGE 29 dicembre 1927, n. 2587 | Conversione in legge del R. decreto-legge 10 febbraio 1927, n. 269, recante modificazioni alle norme vigenti sull'ordinamento delle Casse ordinarie di risparmlose del Monti di pietà di 1ª categoria" (PDF). Gazzetta Ufficiale (in Italian). 69 (15). Rome. 19 January 1928 [written on 29 December 1927; digitized on 1 November 2008]. pp. 263–267 – via Agenzia per l'Italia Digitale.
  13. ^ "Fusione della Cassa di risparmio di Cologna Veneta con quella di Verona" (PDF). Gazzetta Ufficiale (in Italian). 68 (294). Rome. 21 December 1927. p. 4928 – via Agenzia per l'Italia Digitale.
  14. ^ "Incorporazione del Monte di credito su pegno di Belluno, con sede in Belluno, nella Cassa di risparmio di Verona, Vicenza e Belluno, con sede in Verona". Gazzetta Ufficiale (in Italian). Rome. 28 April 1948. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  15. ^ "Incorporazione del Monte di credito su pegno di Bassano del Grappa, nella Cassa di risparmio di Verona, Vicenza e Belluno, con sede in Verona". Gazzetta Ufficiale (in Italian). Rome. 21 November 1955. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  16. ^ a b "Verona incorpora la Cassa di Ancona". La Repubblica (in Italian). Rome. 24 June 1989. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  17. ^ "Fusione, mediante incorporazione, della Cassa di risparmio di Ancona nella Cassa di risparmio di Verona, Vicenza e Belluno". Gazzetta Ufficiale (in Italian). Rome. 7 September 1989. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  18. ^ a b "TABELLA XIII: LE 560 PRINCIPALI AZIENDE E STITUTI DI CREDITO ITALIANI". Le principali società italiane (PDF). Milan: Mediobanca. 1989 [digitized in 2006]. p. 440 [p.518 of PDF]. ISSN 1721-274X. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  19. ^ "Provvedimento N°2749 (C1914): Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Verona, Vicenza, Belluno e Ancona / Fondazione Cassamarca" (PDF) (Press release) (in Italian). Italian Competition Authority. 19 January 1995. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  20. ^ "Provvedimento N°3593 (C2294) Cariverona / Monte di Credito su Pegno di Vicenza" (PDF) (in Italian). Italian Competition Authority. 31 January 1996. Retrieved 1 March 2016.
  21. ^ "Approvazione del progetto di ristrutturazione presentato dal Monte di credito su pegno di Vicenza". Gazzetta Ufficiale (in Italian). 21 November 1995. Retrieved 1 March 2016.
  22. ^ "Provvedimento N°4712 (C2704): Banca delle Marche / Cassa di Risparmio di Loreto / Mediocredito Fondiario Centroitalia" (PDF) (in Italian). Italian Competition Authority. 27 February 1997. p. 3. Retrieved 7 April 2017.
  23. ^ "Fondazione Cariplo in Ambroveneto". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). 26 June 1997. Retrieved 24 March 2015.

External links[edit]