Cassiano Ricardo

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Cassiano Ricardo (July 26, 1895 – January 14, 1974) was a Brazilian journalist, literary critic, and poet.

An exponent of the nationalistic tendencies of Brazilian modernism, he was associated with the Green-Yellow and Anta groups of the movement before launching the Flag group, a social-democratic reaction to these groups. His work evolved into concrete poetry at the end of his career.

Early life[edit]

Cassiano Ricardo was born in São José dos Campos, São Paulo, in 1895.[1]

Career[edit]

Ricardo, formerly a Symbolist poet, became a late adherent to Brazilian modernism and co-founded the mystical nationalist journal Novíssima.[1] In the following year, 1926, he launched the Green-Yellow movement,[1] with Menotti del Picchia, Cândido Motta Filho and Plínio Salgado.[2] In 1928, he co-founded the Flag group, again with Menotti del Picchia and Cândido Motta Filho.[3]

His 1928 book Marcha para Oeste supported the frontier for being both anti-liberal and democratic.[4] He held a hierarchical view of such a society with the whites holding "the spirit of adventure and command".[5]

In 1937, he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Letters, where he campaigned for the Modernist poets to be formally recognized and appreciated.[3]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Dentro da noite (1915)
  • A flauta de Pã (1917)
  • Jardim das Hespérides (1920)
  • A mentirosa de olhos verdes (1924)
  • Vamos caçar papagaios (1926)
  • Borrões de verde e amarelo (1927)
  • Martim Cererê (1928)
  • Deixa estar, jacaré (1931)
  • Canções da minha ternura (1930)
  • Marcha para Oeste (1940)
  • O sangue das horas (1943)
  • Um dia depois do outro (1947)
  • Poemas murais (1950)
  • A face perdida (1950)
  • O arranha-céu de vidro (1956)
  • João Torto e a fábula (1956)
  • Poesias completas (1957)
  • Montanha russa (1960)
  • A difícil manhã (1960)
  • Jeremias sem-chorar (1964)
  • Os sobreviventes (1971)

References[edit]

Footnotes
  1. ^ a b c Balderston & Gonzalez 2004, p. 492.
  2. ^ Bosi 2015, p. 366.
  3. ^ a b Bosi 2015, p. 391.
  4. ^ Aguiar 1979, pp. 20–23.
  5. ^ Garfield 2001, p. 32.
Sources

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Paulo Setúbal
Olivenkranz.png
Brazilian Academy of Letters - Occupant of the 31st chair

1937 — 1974
Succeeded by
José Cândido de Carvalho