Castle Carlton

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Castle Carlton
Castle Carlton is located in Lincolnshire
Castle Carlton
Castle Carlton
Location within Lincolnshire
OS grid referenceTF398837
• London130 mi (210 km) S
Civil parish
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townLouth
Postcode districtLN11
PoliceLincolnshire
FireLincolnshire
AmbulanceEast Midlands
EU ParliamentEast Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Lincolnshire
53°19′55″N 0°05′58″E / 53.331898°N 0.099365°E / 53.331898; 0.099365Coordinates: 53°19′55″N 0°05′58″E / 53.331898°N 0.099365°E / 53.331898; 0.099365

Castle Carlton is a hamlet in the civil parish of Reston (where population details are included) in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. It is situated approximately 5 miles (8 km) south from Louth, and just north from the A157 road.

At Castle Carlton there is a wide moat surrounding a mound on which stood a twelfth-century motte and bailey castle, most likely wooden, founded by Justiciar Hugh Bardolph,[1][2] who is said to have slain a monster.[3]

The village had established itself as a commercial centre by the thirteenth century, reputedly after Hugh Bardolph developed it as a "new town", and it was sometimes known as Market Carlton.[4] Today it is considered a deserted medieval village, or DMV.[5]

The church was dedicated to the Holy Cross, and was a small Perpendicular building. It was demolished in 1902.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Castle UK". Castle - Carlton Castle. Castle UK. Retrieved 3 June 2011.
  2. ^ "Lincs To The Past". Castle Hill, Castle Carlton. Lincolnshire Archives. Retrieved 4 June 2011.
  3. ^ Thorold, Henry; Yates, Jack (1965). Shell Guide To Lincolnshire. Faber and Faber, London. p. 44.
  4. ^ Historic England. "Castle Carlton (893278)". PastScape. Retrieved 4 June 2011.
  5. ^ "Lincs To The Past". Medieval Surface Finds From The Site Of Castle Carlton DMV. Lincolnshire Archives. Retrieved 4 June 2011.
  6. ^ "Lincs To The Past". Holy Cross Church. Lincolnshire Archives. Retrieved 4 June 2011.

External links[edit]