Castres Olympique

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Castres Olympique
Castres olympique badge.png
Full name Castres Olympique
Founded 1906; 110 years ago (1906)
Location Castres, France
Ground(s) Stade Pierre-Antoine (Capacity: 11,500)
President Pierre-Yves Revol
Coach(es) Christophe Urios
League(s) Top 14
2015–16 6th (playoff quarter-finalists)
1st kit
2nd kit
3rd kit
Official website
www.castres-olympique.com

Castres Olympique (French pronunciation: ​[kastʁ olimpik]) is a French rugby union club located in the Occitanian city of Castres and currently competing in the top level of the French league system.

Founded in 1898, the club took its current name in 1906. They play at the Stade Pierre-Antoine, which is one of the smallest in Top 14 with a capacity of 11,500. The team wear blue and white kits.

The team won four French top-division championships in 1949, 1950, 1993 and 2013, as well as one Coupe de France in 1948.

History[edit]

In 1898 several alumni of Castres' municipal college met in a city centre bar and decided to create a team allowing them to play their favourite sport, rugby union. For the first few years this team was part of a multisport club until 1906. Unhappy with the dominating position cycling had within the club, the members of the rugby section decided to leave and create a club of their own, solely dedicated to their sport. It was decided that this club would be named Castres Olympique and its colours would be changed from yellow and black to its current blue, white and grey.

The new club reached the top flight after only 15 years of existence and has remained there ever since, bar for a couple of years during the 80s when the club was in the then Section B of the 1st division. The club has never left the 1st division since 1921.

For a while Castres Olympique would experience mixed fortunes until 1948 when they reached and won their first Coupe de France. The prestigious championship would follow a year later, and again in 1950.

From the 1960s the club would experience a stream of mediocre seasons and steady decline until Pierre Fabre, the founder of a local pharmaceutical company, decided to take over the club and restore it to its former relative glory in 1988.

The 1992–93 French Rugby Union Championship was won by Castres who beat Grenoble 14–11 in the final, but a try of Olivier Brouzet is denied to Grenoble[1] and the decisive try by Gary Whetton was awarded by the referee, Daniel Salles, when in fact the defender Franck Hueber from Grenoble touched down the ball first in his try zone. This error gave the title to Castres. Salles admitted the error 13 years later[2] .[3] .[4]

The club reached the final again in 1995 losing to Toulouse.

Castres won the 2012–13 French Rugby Union Championship beating Toulon 19–14 in the final.[5]

The team's owner, Pierre Fabre, the founder of Laboratoires Pierre Fabre. died on July 20, 2013.[6]

Honours[edit]

Finals results[edit]

French championship[edit]

Date Winners Runners-up Score Venue Spectators
22 May 1949 Castres Olympique Stade Montois 14-3 1 Stade des Ponts Jumeaux, Toulouse 23,000
16 April 1950 Castres Olympique Racing Club de France 11-8 Stade des Ponts Jumeaux, Toulouse 25,000
5 June 1993 Castres Olympique FC Grenoble 14-11 Parc des Princes, Paris 48,000
6 May 1995 Stade Toulousain Castres Olympique 31-16 Parc des Princes, Paris 48,615
1 June 2013 Castres Olympique RC Toulon 19-14 Stade de France, Saint-Denis 80,033
31 May 2014 RC Toulon Castres Olympique 18-10 Stade de France, Saint-Denis 80,174

Current standings[edit]

2016–17 Top 14 Table watch · edit · discuss
Club Played Won Drawn Lost Points For Points Against Points Diff. Tries For Tries Against Try Bonus Losing Bonus Points
1 La Rochelle 6 4 1 1 183 131 +52 19 9 2 1 21
2 Clermont 6 3 2 1 194 131 +63 20 14 2 1 19
3 Montpellier 6 4 0 2 170 96 +74 15 7 2 1 19
4 Castres 6 3 1 2 160 110 +50 16 7 1 1 16
5 Toulon 6 3 0 3 151 148 +3 11 13 1 2 15
6 Bordeaux 6 3 0 3 135 133 +2 10 11 1 1 14
7 Racing 6 3 0 3 140 153 –13 15 14 2 0 14
8 Pau 6 3 0 3 129 144 –15 13 11 1 1 14
9 Brive 6 3 1 2 133 162 –29 7 13 0 0 14
10 Toulouse 6 3 0 3 114 132 –18 8 10 0 1 13
11 Stade Français 6 2 1 3 157 149 +8 15 10 1 1 12
12 Lyon 6 2 1 3 116 152 –36 7 15 1 0 11
13 Bayonne 6 1 1 4 95 155 –60 6 13 0 0 6
14 Grenoble 6 1 0 5 135 216 –81 9 24 0 2 6

If teams are level at any stage, tiebreakers are applied in the following order:

  1. Competition points earned in head-to-head matches
  2. Points difference in head-to-head matches
  3. Try differential in head-to-head matches
  4. Points difference in all matches
  5. Try differential in all matches
  6. Points scored in all matches
  7. Tries scored in all matches
  8. Fewer matches forfeited
  9. Classification in the previous Top 14 season
Green background (rows 1 and 2) receive semi-final play-off places and receive berths in the 2017–18 European Rugby Champions Cup.
Blue background (rows 3 to 6) receive quarter-final play-off places, and receive berths in the Champions Cup.
Yellow background (row 7) advances to a play-off for a chance to compete in the Champions Cup.
Plain background indicates teams that earn a place in the 2017–18 European Rugby Challenge Cup.
Red background (row 13 and 14) will be relegated to Rugby Pro D2. Final table

Current squad[edit]

For player movements leading up to the 2016–17 season, see List of 2016–17 Top 14 transfers § Castres.

2016-17 Note: Flags indicate national union as has been defined under WR eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-WR nationality.

Player Position Union
Jody Jenneker Hooker South Africa South Africa
Brice Mach Hooker France France
Benjamin Nehme Hooker France France
Marc-Antoine Rallier Hooker France France
Yannick Forestier Prop France France
Julien Grolleau Prop France France
Daniel Kotze Prop France France
Mihai Lazăr Prop Romania Romania
Yoann Montes Prop France France
Eric Sione Prop New Zealand New Zealand
Tudor Stroe Prop France France
Antoine Tichit Prop France France
Damien Tussac Prop Germany Germany
Rodrigo Capo Ortega Lock Uruguay Uruguay
Theo Hannoyer Lock France France
Loic Jacquet Lock France France
Thibault Lassalle Lock France France
Victor Moreaux Lock France France
Christophe Samson Lock France France
Alexandre Bias Flanker France France
Yannick Caballero Flanker France France
Anthony Jelonch Flanker France France
Steve Mafi Flanker Tonga Tonga
Maama Vaipulu Flanker New Zealand New Zealand
Mathieu Babillot Number 8 France France
Alex Tulou Number 8 New Zealand New Zealand
Player Position Union
Antoine Dupont Scrum-half France France
Rory Kockott Scrum-half France France
Julien Seron Scrum-half France France
Julien Dumora Fly-half France France
Benjamin Urdapilleta Fly-half Argentina Argentina
Maxime Javaux Fly-half France France
Thomas Combezou Centre France France
Robert Ebersohn Centre South Africa South Africa
Francois Fontaine Centre France France
Afusipa Taumoepeau Centre Australia Australia
Florian Viaelle Centre New Zealand New Zealand
Horacio Agulla Wing Argentina Argentina
Julien Caminati Wing France France
Remy Grosso Wing France France
Kylian Jaminet Wing France France
David Smith Wing Samoa Samoa
Pierre Berard Fullback France France
Geoffrey Palis Fullback France France

Notable former players[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ lacapitale_sto3554485/story.shtml "Combien de fois Bayonne s'est imposé dans la capitale ?" Check |url= value (help). www.rugbyrama.fr. Midi olympique. 3 January 2013. Retrieved 21 August 2013. 
  2. ^ "Finale Castres-Grenoble 93 : l'insupportable aveu de l'arbitre Salles". rugbyolympic.com. 12 December 2006. Retrieved 12 June 2014. 
  3. ^ "Daniel Salles à propos de Castres-Grenoble en 1993 : " Je me suis trompé "". sudouest. 1 June 2013. Retrieved 24 October 2013. 
  4. ^ "Parc des Princes, Paris, 5 june 1993". LNR. 28 December 2004. Retrieved 24 October 2012. 
  5. ^ "Castres et " la magie du rugby "". http://www.republicain-lorrain.fr/. 29 nomvenber 2013. Retrieved 3 June 2013.  Check date values in: |date= (help); External link in |website= (help)
  6. ^ "Pierre Fabre, founder of pharmaceutical giant, dies". Agence France Presse. France 24. 2013-07-20. Retrieved 2013-08-17. 

External links[edit]