Catfish Hodge

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Bobby Allen Hodge (born c. 1944), better known as Catfish Hodge is an American blues musician.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Hodge was born and grew up in Detroit, Michigan, United States.[2] His parents were from rural Kentucky and exposed him to blues, country, and gospel music.

Career[edit]

Catfish Hodge formed the Catfish Band, in which he sang and played guitar.[3] The band performed in the 1960s Detroit Rock scene,[4] opening up for Bob Seger,[5] Black Sabbath, Ted Nugent, and played the Fillmore East. He played with the 1980s band Bluesbusters,[6][7] which released two albums.[8]

During this period he also made frequent trips to the New Orleans area. Combining the sounds from Detroit and New Orleans, Hodge put out the album Eye Witness Blues, which featured Bonnie Raitt and Dr. John.[6][9]

In 1980, Hodge was signed to Adelphi Records.[10] That year he formed a band called Chicken Legs, which toured 17 cities.[11]

In 1983, he and his brother Dallas Hodge formed a band called the Hodge Brothers Band, and performed music from the Chicken Legs album.[12]

In 1996, Hodge recorded a children's album, Adventures at Catfish Pond.[2]

Discography[edit]

  • 1970: Get Down
  • 1970: Live Catfish
  • 1971: Empathy
  • 1973: Boogie Man Gonna Get Ya
  • 1974: Dinosaurs and Alleycats[13]
  • 1975: Soap Opera's
  • 1976: An Evening with Catfish Hodge
  • 1979: Eye Witness Blues / Bout With the Blues
  • 1979: Live At The Bayou
  • 1981: Catfish Hodge & Chicken Legs (Freebo)[14]
  • 1986: Accept No Substitute (Bluesbusters)
  • 1988: This Time (Bluesbusters)
  • 1994: Catfish Blues
  • 1995: Like A Big Dog Barking
  • 1996: Adventures at Catfish Pond[2]
  • 1997: Bare Necessities
  • 2001: Let's Eat
  • 2002: Twenty Years
  • 2006: Communication
  • 2014: Different Strokes[15][16][17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Saxophone Journal. Dorn Publications. 2002. p. 14.
  2. ^ a b c "Musician's 'Adventures' Inspired by Fatherhood". Los Angeles Times, October 10, 1996|JAMES E. FOWLER
  3. ^ William York (April 1982). Who's who in rock music. Scribner. p. 59. ISBN 978-0-684-17342-9.
  4. ^ Detroit Blues: Official Quarterly of the Detroit Blues Society. Detroit Blues Society. 1995. p. 24.
  5. ^ Steve Miller (2013). Detroit Rock City: The Uncensored History of Rock 'n' Roll in America's Loudest City. Da Capo Press. p. 46. ISBN 978-0-306-82184-4.
  6. ^ a b "The Bluesbusters"'. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. (26 July 1986). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. p. 21. ISSN 0006-2510.
  7. ^ DB: The Sound Engineering Magazine. Sagamore Publishing Company. 1989.
  8. ^ Alan Reder; John Baxter (6 October 1999). Listen to This: Leading Musicians Recommend Their Favorite Artists and Recordings. Hyperion. p. 44. ISBN 978-0-7868-8260-1.
  9. ^ "Rosemary Butler – The Girl Who Fell in Love with the World" Archived 2017-01-18 at the Wayback Machine. Rockceller Magazine, Hollye Dexter
  10. ^ High Fidelity. ABC Leisure Magazines. 1980. p. 100.
  11. ^ "Catfish Hodge And Chicken Legs: Really Cooking". Washington Post, Richard Harrington November 16, 1980
  12. ^ "Dallas Hodge - Reelin’". Blues Blast Magazine, July 23, 2008.
  13. ^ Billboard Recommended Articles. Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 11 May 1974. p. 78. ISSN 0006-2510.
  14. ^ "Top Album Picks: EPs". Nielsen Business Media, Inc. (6 February 1982). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. p. 71. ISSN 0006-2510.
  15. ^ "Detroit veteran mixes it up with help from Funkadelic". Record Collector Magazine, Max Bell, Issue 430.
  16. ^ "Bob "Catfish" Hodge | Album Discography". AllMusic. Retrieved 11 August 2019.
  17. ^ "Bob "Catfish" Hodge Band | Album Discography". AllMusic. Retrieved 11 August 2019.

Other sources[edit]