Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception (Burlington, Vermont)

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Cathedral of the
Immaculate Conception
44°28′47.05″N 73°12′53.56″W / 44.4797361°N 73.2148778°W / 44.4797361; -73.2148778
Location 20 Pine Street
Burlington, Vermont
Country United States
Denomination Roman Catholic
Founded 1830
Dedication Immaculate Conception
Status Cathedral
Style Modern
Completed 1977
Materials Brick
Diocese Burlington
Bishop(s) Christopher J. Coyne
Rector Rev. Msgr. Peter A. Routhier

The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, located at 20 Pine Street in Burlington, Vermont, United States, with grounds bounded by Pearl, St. Paul and Cherry Streets, is the cathedral church of the Diocese of Burlington.


The cathedral from behind.

The parish was founded as St. Mary's in 1830. The parish church that was built in 1841 became the pro-cathedral when the diocese was established in 1852.[1] Construction of the first Immaculate Conception Cathedral began in 1862 and continued until 1867. Progress was slowed because of the American Civil War. This church served as the diocesan cathedral until it was destroyed by arson on March 13, 1972. Timothy Austin confessed to the police that he set the fire. He later plead innocent by reason of insanity and was sent for treatment at the state hospital.[2]

In 1974 New York City architect Edward Larrabee Barnes was chosen to design a new cathedral on the same property.[3] Vermont landscape architect Dan Kiley was commissioned to plan the park-like setting, which included a free-standing bell tower near the corner of Cherry and St. Paul Streets. The project was completed in 1977.

In 2001 Saint Joseph Church in Burlington was named the Co-Cathedral for the diocese.

See also[edit]



  1. ^ Blow, David. "A Cathedral for Burlington". Retrieved 2013-02-27. 
  2. ^ Parsons, Marselis. "Church fires in Burlington's past". WCAX-TV. Retrieved 2013-12-31. 
  3. ^ Colman, Devin. "Dan Kiley Landscape at Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception". The Cultural Landscape Foundation. Retrieved 2013-02-27. 

External links[edit]