Caucas

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Thargamos and his sons.
The order of the figures from left to right is: Movakan, Bardos, Kartlos, Haos, Lekos, Thargamos, Caucas, Egros. An opening folio of the Georgian Chronicles (Vakhtangiseuli redaction), 1700s.

Caucas or Kavkasos (Georgian: კავკასოსი) was the purported ancestor of Caucasians. His story is narrated in the compilation of the medieval Georgian chronicles, Kartlis Tskhovreba, taken down from oral tradition by Leonti Mroveli in the 11th century. The legend has it that he was a son of Targamos and, thus, brother of Haos, Movakos, Lekos, Heros, Kartlos (known to be ancestor of Georgian people), and Egros took their origin.

Caucas' son Dzurdzuk is said to be the ancestor of modern Chechens and Ingushetians.[1]

Genealogy[edit]

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Noah
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Japheth
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gomer
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Togarmah
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Caucas
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Descendants[edit]

According to Leonti Mroveli, the 11th-century Georgian chronicler, the word Caucasian is derived from the Vainakh ancestor Kavkas.[2] "The Vainakhs are the ancient natives of the Caucasus. It is noteworthy, that according to the genealogical table drawn up by Leonti Mroveli, the legendary forefather of the Vainakhs was "Kavkas", hence the name Kavkasians, one of the ethnicons met in the ancient Georgian written sources, signifying the ancestors of the Chechens and Ingush. As appears from the above, the Vainakhs, at least by name, are presented as the most "Caucasian" people of all the Caucasians (Caucasus - Kavkas - Kavkasians) in the Georgian historical tradition."[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ G.Qoranashvili (1995), Questions of Ethnic Identity According to Leonti Mroveli's Historical Chronicles, Studies, Vol. 1, Tbilisi.
  2. ^ The work of Leonti Mroveli: "The history of the Georgian Kings" dealing with the history of Georgia and the Caucasus since ancient times to the 5th century AD, is included in medieval code of Georgian annals "Kartlis Tskhovreba".
  3. ^ "Caucasian Knot | An Essay On the History of the Vainakh People. On the origin of the Vainakhs". Eng.kavkaz-uzel.ru. Retrieved November 3, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Microsoft Word - 4C04B861-0826-0853BD.doc" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on February 25, 2012. Retrieved November 3, 2012.