Cauliflory

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Flowers growing from the hard and woody horizontal stem of a Syzygium moorei, Australia
Jackfruits growing directly from the trunk

Cauliflory is a botanical term referring to plants that flower and fruit from their main stems or woody trunks rather than from new growth and shoots.[1] This can allow trees to be pollinated or have their seeds dispersed by animals which cannot climb or fly.[2] With fruit, plants may instead have fruit which drop from the canopy and ripen only after they reach the ground, an alternative "strategy" to cauliflory. (Note that the concept of cauliflory includes that of ramiflory.[1])

Families, genera and (some) species[edit]

(list incomplete)

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "PlantNET: NSW Flora Online: Glossary of Botanical Terms: C, Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, Australia". Retrieved 23 April 2018.
  2. ^ Jeremy M.B. Smith. "Tropical forest: Population and community development and structure: Relationships between the flora and fauna -- Encyclopædia Britannica". Retrieved 2008-03-07.
  3. ^ Govaerts, R. et al. (2018) "Theobroma cacao". Plants of the World online. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  4. ^ a b Govaerts, R. et al. (2018) "Cola". Plants of the World online. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  5. ^ "Crescentia cujete - the calabash tree". Tropilab. Inc. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  6. ^ Govaerts, R. et al. (2018) "Circis siliquastrum". Plants of the World online. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  7. ^ Govaerts, R. et al. (2018) "Dysoxylum parasiticum ". Plants of the World online. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  8. ^ "Dysoxylom spectabile". NZflora. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  9. ^ Govaerts, R. et al. (2018) "Pancovia ". Plants of the World online. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  10. ^ Govaerts, R. et al. (2018) "Pancovia golungensis ". Plants of the World online. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  11. ^ Govaerts, R. et al. (2018) "Drypetes". Plants of the World online. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  12. ^ "Halleria lucida". GBIF. Retrieved 22 April 2018. (See images)
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j (in French) Gereau, E. R., & Kenfack, D. (2000). Le genre Uvariopsis (Annonaceae) en Afrique tropicale, avec la description d’une espece nouvelle du Cameroun. Adansonia, 22(1), 39-43.
  14. ^ Cheek, M. (2014) "Uvariopsis submontana. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2014: e.T45421A3001680". Retrieved 22 April 2018. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2014-3.RLTS.T45421A3001680.en.(See images)
  15. ^ Ahmed, QamarUddin; Alhassan, AlhassanMuhammad (2016). "Averrhoa bilimbiLinn.: A review of its ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry, and pharmacology". Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences. 8 (4): 265–271. doi:10.4103/0975-7406.199342. ISSN 0975-7406. PMC 5314823. PMID 28216948.


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