Cavallucci

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Cavallucci
Type Biscuit
Place of origin Italy
Region or state Siena
Main ingredients Anise seeds, almonds, candied fruits, coriander, flour, Tuscan millefiori honey
Cookbook: Cavallucci  Media: Cavallucci

Cavallucci are a rich Italian Christmas pastry made with anise, almonds, candied fruits, coriander, and flour. They are Sienese in origin, and the name translates approximately to "little horses."[1] The chewy biscuits traditionally use Tuscan millefiori honey as an essential ingredient in the paste.

History[edit]

The cookies were originally imprinted with the image of a horse (cavalli is the Italian term for horses).[2] The cookies sold today are a gentrified version of a pastry which is traceable to the reign of Lorenzo the Magnificent (1449–1492), when they were called biriquocoli.[3]

Many theories are associated with the origin of its name. According to the most popular version of the story, cavallucci were served to travelers on horseback as a source of nourishment for long trips.[3] Along a similar vein, another story is that postal workers who delivered mail over long distances ate the cookies on a regular basis.[2] Another theory states that these sweets were the usual snack of servants who worked in horse stables of rich Italian aristocrats in Siena, a city which gained its fame for horse racing.[1]

Serving[edit]

The pastry is often paired with sweet dessert wines, such as Vin Santo, and dipped into the wine before being eaten.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Cavallucci". ifood.tv. Retrieved 16 December 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Esposito, Mary Ann. "Horsemen's Cookies". Ciao Italia. Retrieved 16 December 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c "Christmas cakes and sweets in Tuscany". Turismo in Toscana. Regione Toscana. Retrieved 14 December 2014. 

External links[edit]