Cavatappi

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Cavatappi
Cellentani2.jpg
Dried Cavatappi
Alternative namesCellentani, serpentini, trivelle, stortelli, spirali, double elbows, amori
TypePasta
Place of originItaly

Cavatappi [kavaˈtappi] is macaroni formed in a helical tube shape. Cavatappi is the Italian word for corkscrew. It is known by other names, including cellentani, amori, spirali, or tortiglione.[1] It is usually scored with lines or ridges (rigati in Italian) on the surface. Cavatappi is a type of macaroni, or thick, hollow pasta that is made without using eggs. It may be yellow in color, like most pastas, or have vegetables or a food coloring added to make it green or red. It can be used in a variety of dishes to include salads, soups, and casseroles.

Etymology[edit]

Cavatappi is an Italian word created by compounding cava and tappi, which literally means "stopper (or top or cap) extractor" (a corkscrew). It is known by many other names.

Origin[edit]

Cavatappi originated in Southern Italy.[2]

Shape[edit]

The cavatappi shape is perhaps best described as a ridged tube extruded into a helix shape though a small number of rotations. The number of turns is commonly in the range of one to three[citation needed] (with fewer than one full turn, the shape degenerates into a twisted version of elbow macaroni).

While the word "spiral" is often used colloquially to describe helical objects (such as a spiral staircase), in mathematics, a spiral is considered to be a curve on the plane of progressive radius, and the name "helix" is preferred for a curve inscribed on a cylinder, such as that of DNA's double helix. The notion of a screw as a helical surface dates back to the time of Archimedes.[relevant? ]

Common recipes[edit]

Cavatappi is used with Italian-style foods such as cavatappi Amatriciana,[3] pesto Americana, and cavatappi pomodoro.[4] It is mostly found in tomato-based pasta sauces and is associated closely with different types of cheeses such as mozzarella, Parmesan, and provolone.[citation needed] It is a common choice for macaroni and cheese.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Nibble: Pasta Types". www.thenibble.com. Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  2. ^ "The Nibble: Pasta Types". www.thenibble.com. Retrieved 2018-04-13.
  3. ^ "Carrabbas Cavatappi Amatriciana (Side Dish Pasta) Recipe - Food.com". www.food.com. Retrieved 2016-02-08.
  4. ^ "Cavatappi Pomodoro". Just A Pinch Recipes. Retrieved 2016-02-08.
  5. ^ Roman, Alison. "How to Make Mac and Cheese". New York Times Cooking. Retrieved 10 April 2018.

External links[edit]