Cavendish W. Cannon

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Cavendish Wells Cannon (February 1, 1895 – October 7, 1962) was a long-time United States foreign service officer and diplomat.[1]

During World War II Cavendish served as the Assistant Chief of the State Department's Division of Southern European Affairs.[2] For a time Cannon's work took him to Syria.[3]

He served as U.S. ambassador to Greece from 1953 to 1956 and ambassador to Morocco from 1956 to 1958. During the late 1940s Cannon served as ambassador to Yugoslavia[4] Among his fellow ambassadors was the Czechoslovak Ambassador Josef Korbel. Cannon was one of the people who spoke in favor of Korbel's pro-democratic leanings when he was trying to gain assylum in the United States.[5]

In 1948 Cannon was the chair of the US delegation to the Danube River Conference of 1948.

Cannon was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[6]

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
James Hugh Keeley, Jr.
U.S. Envoy Extraordinary
and Minister Plenipotentiary to Syria

1950–1952
Succeeded by
James S. Moose, Jr.
Preceded by
Lincoln MacVeagh
United States Ambassador to Portugal
1952–1953
Succeeded by
M. Robert Guggenheim
Preceded by
John Emil Peurifoy
United States Ambassador to Greece
1953–1956
Succeeded by
George V. Allen
Preceded by
William J. Porter
United States Ambassador to Morocco
1956–1958
Succeeded by
Charles W. Yost

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cavendish Wells Cannon". U. S. Department of State. Retrieved May 28, 2011. 
  2. ^ the Problem of Bessarabia and Northern Bucovina during World War II
  3. ^ excerpt from journal of Eleanor Roosevelt
  4. ^ Jones, Howard. "A New Kind of War", America's Global Strategy and the Truman Doctrine. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989) p. 126
  5. ^ Dobbs, Michael (March 15, 2000). Madeleine Albright: A Twentieth-Century Odyssey. Henry Holt and Company. pp. 130, 137. ISBN 978-0-8050-5660-0. Retrieved August 4, 2013. 
  6. ^ “Church Member Nominated Ambassador to Finland,” Ensign, March 1975 p. 78.