Cayetano Corona Gaspariano

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Cayetano Corona Gaspariano is a Mexican potter from San Pablo del Monte, Tlaxcala, who is the only authenticated producer of Talavera ceramics in the state.[1][2]

He left his home state at age thirteen to learn the craft in Puebla, working for years at the Uriarte workshop. In 1981, he decided to return to San Pablo del Monte, founding his own workshop with his sons. This eventually grew into the current La Corona enterprise.[1][3]

The workshop produces bowls, large covered vases called tibores, flowerpots, jars, platter and more. Tiles are also made, including those which are assembled to create murals, especially with country scenes and religious imagery. The pieces are made with two types of clay, a black sandy type and a rose-colored clay, both bought in bulk in Puebla. The clays are blended, wet and left to ferment before pieces are shaped, usually with molds. Then pieces are set to dry in an unventilated room, which can take up to a month. The unglazed pieces are fired, the coated in a white glaze made with tin and lead. The designs painted on with mineral pigments limited to the traditional colors of Talavera ceramics: blue, yellow, red, green, black and white.[1][3]

Because of its certification, the Corona family can sell its ware in upscale markets in Mexico such as Liverpool.[2] They also export to Canada, the United States, Denmark and Japan.[1]

In 2001, Corona Gaspariano was named a “grand master” by the Fomento Cultural Banamex .[1] La Corona and other workshops run by the family received a visit from the state governor in 2012.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Grandes Maestros del Arte Popular Mexicano. Mexico City: Collección Fomento Cultural Banamex. 2001. pp. 113–114. ISBN 968-5234-03-5. 
  2. ^ a b c "Visitó MGZ tres talleres de talavera en SPM". Puebla: La Jornada Oriente. November 14, 2012. Retrieved January 21, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Cayetano Corona Gaspariano - Talavera Tlaxcalteca.". Tlaxcala: La Corona. Retrieved January 21, 2014.