Cazenovia Creek

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Cazenovia Creek
Country United States
State New York
County Erie
Tributaries
 - left West Branch Cazenovia Creek
 - right East Branch Cazenovia Creek
Source
 - location Aurora
 - coordinates 42°45′38″N 78°38′42″W / 42.76056°N 78.64500°W / 42.76056; -78.64500 [1]
Mouth Buffalo River
 - location South Buffalo
 - coordinates 42°51′40″N 78°49′36″W / 42.86111°N 78.82667°W / 42.86111; -78.82667Coordinates: 42°51′40″N 78°49′36″W / 42.86111°N 78.82667°W / 42.86111; -78.82667 [1]
Location of the mouth of Cazenovia Creek in New York State

Cazenovia Creek is a small stream in Western New York, United States. It is a tributary of the Buffalo River, which empties into Lake Erie. Cazenovia Creek and its watershed are entirely within Erie County.[1]

Course[edit]

Cazenovia Creek is formed from its two branches east of the Village of East Aurora and flows through the Towns of Aurora, Elma, West Seneca, and the City of Buffalo. It joins the Buffalo River in the South Buffalo neighborhood.

The East Branch of Cazenovia Creek flows through the Village of East Aurora and has its sources in the Southtowns of Erie County, primarily in the towns of Colden, Wales, Holland, and Sardinia. The West Branch of Cazenovia Creek rises from sources in the towns of Colden, Concord, and Sardinia.

History[edit]

Cazenovia Creek is named after Theophilus Cazenove, an agent of the Holland Land Company.

In 1897, landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted drew up plans for a park near the south city line of Buffalo. A farm at that location was purchased in 1890, and Cazenovia Park, straddling Cazenovia Creek, was built at that location. The park is in the South Buffalo section of the city.

Cazenovia Creek is known for its annual ice jams in the early spring when temperatures rise.

Fishing[edit]

Cazenovia Creek also has a wide variety of fish that run through its waters. Species include catfish, large and small mouth bass, and rainbow and brown trout. Water levels can rise and fall very quickly and the current can be very strong at times.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]