Cecil Hankins

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Cecil Hankins
Personal information
Born (1922-01-06)January 6, 1922
Covin, Alabama
Died June 3, 2002(2002-06-03) (aged 80)
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Listed weight 175 lb (79 kg)
Career information
High school Zaneis Consolidated School
(Ardmore, Oklahoma)
College Oklahoma State
Position Guard
Number 9, 11, 5
Career history
1946–1947 St. Louis Bombers
1947–1948 Boston Celtics
Career highlights and awards
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Cecil O. Hankins (January 6, 1922 – June 3, 2002) was an American professional basketball and football player who played for the St. Louis Bombers and Boston Celtics in the Basketball Association of America prior to the formation of the NBA.

Hankins was a four-sport star at Zaneis Consolidated School and attended Oklahoma A&M (now Oklahoma State University). After playing basketball and running track as a freshman, Hankins transferred to Southeastern Oklahoma State University where he starred in basketball and football before returning to Oklahoma State for his senior year. In that year, Hankins was a key player for Henry Iba's 1945 national championship team, averaging 13.3 points for the Aggies. Hankins also starred on the gridiron, starting at halfback for the 1945 Cotton Bowl champions.[1]

Following the close of his collegiate career, Cecil Hankins weighed opportunities in both professional football (with the Boston Yanks) and basketball. He ultimately chose basketball, signing with the St. Louis Bombers of the BAA. Hankins played two seasons in the league, with the Bombers and the Boston Celtics. He averaged 4.9 points per game in 80 contests.[2]

After his professional career ended, Hankins became a basketball and football coach at Sand Springs High School. He also officiated basketball and football games at the collegiate level. He retired as director of athletics at Sand Springs in 1988. Cecil Hankins died on June 3, 2002.[1]

BAA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played  FG%  Field-goal percentage
 FT%  Free-throw percentage  APG  Assists per game
 PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP FG% FT% APG PPG
1946–47 St. Louis 55 .299 .600 .3 5.9
1947–48 Boston 25 .198 .686 .3 2.8
Career 80 .276 .616 .3 4.9

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP FG% FT% APG PPG
1947 St. Louis 2 .286 .500 .0 2.5
Career 2 .286 .500 .0 2.5

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Hankins dies at age 80". The Durant Daily News. June 9, 2002. Retrieved July 29, 2011. 
  2. ^ [1], accessed July 29, 2011

External links[edit]