Cedrol

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Cedrol
Cedrol skeletal.svg
Names
IUPAC name
(1S,2R,5S,7R,8R)-2,6,6,8-tetramethyltricyclo[5.3.1.01,5]undecan-8-ol
Identifiers
77-53-2
ChEMBL ChEMBL1974890
ChemSpider 59018
Jmol 3D model Interactive image
PubChem 65575
Properties
C15H26O
Molar mass 222.37 g·mol−1
Density 1.01 g/mL
Melting point 86 to 87 °C (187 to 189 °F; 359 to 360 K)[1]
Boiling point 273 °C (523 °F; 546 K)[2]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Cedrol is a sesquiterpene alcohol found in the essential oil of conifers (cedar oil), especially in the genera Cupressus (cypress) and Juniperus (juniper). It has also been identified in Origanum onites, a plant related to oregano.[3] Its main uses are in the chemistry of aroma compounds.[4] It makes up about 19% of cedarwood oil Texas and 15.8% of cedarwood oil Virginia.[5]

Cedrol has toxic and possibly carcinogenic properties.[6] Results of a 2015 study suggest that cedrol strongly attracts pregnant female mosquitoes after they have fed, which can be used to create cedrol-baited traps.[7]

See also[edit]

  • Cedrene, another component of cedar oil

References[edit]

  1. ^ Budavari, Susan, ed. (1996), The Merck Index: An Encyclopedia of Chemicals, Drugs, and Biologicals (12th ed.), Merck, ISBN 0911910123 , 1961
  2. ^ Sigma-Aldrich Co., (+)-Cedrol. Retrieved on 25 May 2011.
  3. ^ Connolly, JD; Hill, RA, eds. (1991). Dictionary of Terpenoids. Voume 1 Mono- and sesquiterpenoids. Chapman&Hall. SQ02555. ISBN 0-412-25770-X. 
  4. ^ Breitmeier, E (2006). Terpenes: flavors, fragrances, pharmaca, pheromones. Wiley-VCH. pp. 46–47. ISBN 3-527-31786-4. 
  5. ^ Susan Barclay-Nichols. "Point of Interest!". swiftcraftymonkey.blogspot.com. 
  6. ^ Sabine, J.R. (1975). "Exposure to an environment containing the aromatic red cedar, Juniperus virginiana: procarcinogenic, enzyme-inducing and insecticidal effects.". Toxicology. 5 (2): 221–235. doi:10.1016/0300-483x(75)90119-5. PMID 174251. 
  7. ^ Lindh, Jenny; Okal, Michael (March 2015). "Discovery of an oviposition attractant for gravid malaria vectors of the Anopheles gambiae species complex". Malaria Journal. 14 (119). doi:10.1186/s12936-015-0636-0.