Celebrity culture

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Celebrity culture is a high-volume perpetuation of celebrities' personal lives on a global scale. It is inherently tied to consumer interests where celebrities transform their fame to become product brands.

Whereas a culture can usually be physically identified, and its group characteristics easily observed, celebrity culture exists solely as a collection of individuals' desires for increased celebrity viewing. Celebrities themselves do not form a cohesive and identifiable group with which they identify themselves. Celebrities are found across a spectrum of activities and communities including acting, politics, fashion, sports and music. The "culture" is created when it is common knowledge within a society that people are interested in celebrities and are willing to alter their own lives to take part in celebrities' lives. The "culture" is first defined by factors outside of celebrities themselves, and then augmented by celebrities' involvement within that publicly constructed culture. Celebrity culture has become a part of everyday society and functions as a form of entertainment.[1] Today, everyday citizens play an important role in the perpetuation of celebrity culture by constantly checking the whereabouts of celebrities, the trends within celebrity culture, and the general lives of celebrity via media.[1] Celebrity culture is now reflected in social norms and values because of the extreme citizen involvement.[2] Today, as it is now used as entertainment, celebrity culture is viewed as a form of "escapism" from reality and a means of preoccupation for everyday people.[3]

Promotion from celebrities[edit]

There have been multiple phases in the popularity of celebrity culture. The earliest examples would include the broadcasting of television programs where human beings could reach wider audiences and individuals could be given rise to fame. As different technologies were released, the manipulation of audiences changed, and the reaches of celebrity culture has greatly expanded. Entrepreneurial individuals began to recognize the financial value in purposefully promoting certain individuals, and thus a consumer approach to celebrities as brands emerged. A culture began to take shape as consumers accepted celebrities as a part of society. This acceptance along with shrewd marketing perpetuates celebrity culture with its constantly shifting customs and beliefs. Celebrity culture can be viewed as synonymous with celebrity industry, where celebrities are treated as products to be sold. Celebrity culture differs from consumer culture in that celebrity culture is a single aspect of consumer culture. Celebrity culture could not exist without consumer culture, as people are consistently buying magazines, apps for celebrities, and other celebrity-related merchandise. Consumers' choices are thus influenced by celebrities' choices. By following celebrities, consumers are invited to take part in the collective society created by the existence of celebrity culture, unknowingly perpetuated by the consumers themselves. Participants of the celebrity culture phenomenon also include the celebrities themselves, being aware they can brand themselves and achieve financial gains through their own fame and status, apart from the foundation of their celebrity pre-branding.

"To people who have grown tired of self-government, the belief in kings and queens and fairy tales seems easier and more comfortable than the practice of politics," wrote Lewis Lapham in his book, The Wish For Kings. This notion is the basis for the naturally occurring relationship between "regular" men and women, and those on a pedestal.

The famous religious books of the world's faiths are replete with examples of individuals who are well known by the general public. Some of the pharaohs of ancient Egypt set in motion devices to ensure their own fame for centuries to come.

Celebrity culture, once restricted to royalty and biblical/mythical figures, has pervaded many sectors of society including business, publishing, and even academia (the scilebrities). With every scientific advance names have become attached to discoveries. Especially for large contributions to humanity, the contributor is usually regarded honourably. Mass media has increased the exposure and power of celebrity. A trend has developed that celebrity carries with it increasingly more social capital than in earlier times. Each nation or cultural community (linguistic, ethnic, religious) has its own independent celebrity system, but this is becoming less the case due to globalization (see J-pop).

Perpetuation of celebrity culture[edit]

According to Oliver Dreissens, celebrity’s social and cultural prominence can be traced back to the success of the mass media.[4] The various forms of mass media allowed for the spread of new images and branding of celebrities. Especially with the inclusion of televisions in the average home, there became more of a familiarity with the people or celebrities now "in our homes".[5] Media surrounding celebrities has heavily influenced not only celebrity culture but the general social environment in our lives.[6] Celebrities are known to not only influence what we buy but many other things such as body image, career aspirations and politics. Richard Dyer has stated that celebrity culture is bound up with the condition of global capitalism in which "individuals are seen to determine society".[7] Newer technologies, such as cable television and 24/7 coverage, have made today’s celebrities manufactured for mass consumption, as opposed to the celebrities of the thirties and the fifties who were more self-made.[8] 24/7 coverage pushed for more programming and people to fill the extra time. With this evolved more shows and celebrities who partook in the additional screen time. Reality television has been a large part of fostering a new celebrity culture that is more interchangeable and recognizable.[9] Cable television and social media media sites such as YouTube, have made “overnight” sensations which have perpetuated today's perception of celebrity culture.[9]:493 Celebrities such as Justin Bieber, who rose to immense fame after being discovered on YouTube, are argued to elicit emotional ties and self-reflexiveness that invoke a seemingly personal connection.[9] This can be seen with some fans, especially female fans, feeling like they have a certain ownership or connection over a celebrity.[10]

Celebrity and political culture[edit]

Katy Perry and Hillary Clinton at the I'm With Her concert, which supported Hillary Clinton in the 2016 Presidential Race

There has recently[specify] been an intersection of celebrity and political culture. This is a result of the large platform given to celebrities.[citation needed] As Jane Johnson, a reporter for the popular British celebrity publication Closer observed that the gossip surrounding celebrities is a nationally unifying among all social groups.[8] This unification and large platform provided by celebrities has been a point of interest for political leaders and groups to gain farther reach within various campaigns. Young adults have had historically lower voter turnout than any other voting age group. Knowing this, politicians and public figures draw from the cultural resources curated by celebrities by mimicking the popular, accessible public persona given off by today's celebrities.[8] As noted by author Frank Furedi, “Politicians self consciously attempt to either acquire a celebrity image or to associate themselves with individuals who possess this status”.[8] This can be seen with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who has become somewhat of a celebrity because of the perception of being personable and supporting progressive, liberal policies. Another example of this was Katy Perry campaigning and performing for Hillary Clinton during the 2016 Presidential election.

Today[edit]

Celebrity status is widely sought by many people. Celebrities are often displeased by their status. Paparazzi are a problem for celebrities. Another problem is celebrity marriage. There is research[clarification needed] that suggests child celebrities have poor emotional health in adulthood, and often turn to drug abuse. Celebrity status is ranked by an "A-list" or "B-list" hierarchy. Sometimes people who achieved celebrity status come to regret it, e.g. Bart Spring in 't Veld, who came to loathe the reality TV celebrity culture which Big Brother, of which he was the first winner in the world, instigated.

Celebrity gossip[edit]

Celebrity gossip has become an integral part of American culture, acting as not only a form of entertainment, but a form of social involvement and social order.[11] Gossip allows people to connect and interact with one another, providing a sense of community within society. Through gossip, people are able to affirm their values and ideas by hearing about celebrity struggle via tabloids and other forms of media. The information given to people to consume and discuss allows for civic engagement on a global scale as there is material to talk about with others that is generally known through gossip.[11]

Vehicles[edit]

In the USA, celebrity culture is created and disseminated by television talk shows such as Entertainment Tonight, where actors and music stars promote their latest films and albums, and by many celebrity magazines such as People, Us, and Star. Another phenomenon is the arrival and rise of "micro-celebrities" through the WWW (internet celebrities).

Social media[edit]

Celebrity culture is a constantly changing topic that grows as technology does. Different platforms are being implemented: Instagram, Snapchat and Facebook, all of which provide a new outlet for celebrities to express their thoughts. Twitter is constantly changing celebrity views and provides an unmonitored space for opinions to be shared. It provides a platform for celebrities to re-share ideas and safely share theirs. It also allows for people to comment, making it engaging to fans and followers. Instagram is also growing and continues to be a popular outlet for celebrities, as it provides an outlet for purely pictures. Many of these pictures also include other people who are famous, boosting their image and reaching to different fan bases. Lastly, Facebook is still a common used platform that many celebrities use, especially older demographics. Many older generation prefer Facebook because it is easy to navigate and people can share and write posts that are of importance to them.[12]

Twitter[edit]

Twitter allowed higher frequency of interaction with people, thus increasing intimacy and the perception of culture. Twitter users could now directly interact with celebrities with the expectation of a public response.

Instagram[edit]

Through Instagram's unique format another layer of celebrity culture was added, allowing celebrities to further their intimacy with followers by sharing selected photos and videos with their audience. With each additional platform a celebrity uses to promote themselves, a wider view is created thus enhancing the perception of culture. Instagram also recently changed the layout to try to help celebrities become more noticed.They use an algorithm that determines what pictures are at the top of a person's feed and what pictures are at the bottom and are harder to find.[13] Trends of celebrities found on Instagram have a massive cultural impact as the platform allows for people to see and imitate a celebrities via clothing, speech, or humor allowing them to indirectly engage with celebrity culture.[1] Today, Instagram can be used as a platform for marketing as celebrities can be paid huge sums of money for product placement or usage in their posts.[14]

Tantrums[edit]

Most celebrities are known for "throwing tantrums" to get their way. They're also known for getting in debates with their friends who are also celebrities in order to amp up the drama to let their names be seen. When an individual is in the public eye, it changes how they act and their behavior. Usually it brings people to act in extremes, whether that be extremely good or extremely bad. Most times, publicity only goes to celebrities who are going against the social norm, doing something different. People are more interested in reading about something crazy a celebrity did than them going out and have a respectful lunch

Complaints[edit]

A common complaint of modern celebrity culture is that the public, instead of seeking virtues or talents in celebrities, seek those who are the most willing to break ethical boundaries, or those who are most aggressive in self-promotion. In other words, infamy has replaced fame. The social role of the town drunk, the court jester, or the sexually indiscreet are not new, but arguably, the glorification of these individuals is. Society selects celebrities that provide the most entertainment and news stories as the most notorious. For example, the Kardashian family has no real talents to be celebritized, but they provide excess amounts of entertainment via Keeping Up with the Kardashians that allows them to remain in the spotlight, acting as the pinnacle of celebrity culture.

Explanations[edit]

One possible explanation of this trend is that an artificial importance has been created in order to promote a product or a service, rather than to record a purely biographical event. As more new products are launched in a world market that is constantly expanding, the need for more celebrities has become an [industry] in itself.

Another explanation, used by Chuck Palahniuk, is that this exaggeration of modern celebrity culture is created out of a need for drama and spectacle. In the book Haunted, he describes the pattern of creating a celebrity as a god-like figure, and once this image is created, the desire to destroy it and shame the individual in the most extreme ways possible. Tabloid magazines are the prototype example of this theory.

Posthumous fame[edit]

Some creators such as poets, artists, musicians, and inventors are little-known and little-appreciated during their lives but are feted as brilliant innovators after their deaths. In some cases, after historians uncover a creator's role in the development of some type of cultural or technical process, the contributions of these little-known individuals become more widely known. A desire to achieve this type of posthumous fame may have motivated Alan Abel, Adam Rich and Pauly Shore to stage their own deaths.

Sometimes a false death mention can cause a person to rethink their legacy. Alfred Nobel founded the Nobel Prizes after an erroneous obituary labelled him a "merchant of death" due to his invention and selling of dynamite.

People who were far more famous after their deaths than during their lifetime (and often were completely or relatively unknown) include Greek philosopher Socrates; scientist Galileo Galilei; 1800s-era poet John Keats; painter Vincent van Gogh; poet and novelist Edgar Allan Poe; singer Eva Cassidy; comedian Bill Hicks; writer Emily Dickinson; artist Edith Holden, whose 1906 diary was a best-seller when published posthumously in 1977; writer Franz Kafka; singer Jeff Buckley; diarist Anne Frank; philosopher Søren Kierkegaard; writer John Kennedy Toole (who posthumously won a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction 12 years after his death); author Stieg Larsson (who died with his Millennium novels unpublished); musician, artist and poet Rozz Williams; and William Webb Ellis, the alleged inventor of Rugby football.

Herostratus, a young Greek man arsoned the Temple of Artemis (one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World) in 356 BC in order to immortalize his name. Although authorities at the time tried to expunge him from history and punished people with the death penalty for even merely mentioning his name, he succeeded in achieving lasting fame, as his name is well known to this day.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/19392390903519057?needAccess=true
  2. ^ https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=3sKwWqBQpbUC&oi=fnd&pg=PR1&dq=celebrity+culture+in+social+media&ots=-YoDSU6rGQ&sig=1zpMucYbJhg4i0ttaB6JLBPfvaE#v=snippet&q=celebrity%20culture&f=false
  3. ^ https://www.huffingtonpost.com/jo-piazza/americans-unhealthy-obsession-with-celebrities_b_1385405.html
  4. ^ Driessens, Olivier. “The Celebritization of Society and Culture: Understanding the Structural Dynamics of Celebrity Culture.” International Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 16, no. 6, 2013, pp. 641–657., doi:10.1177/1367877912459140. Accessed 23 Feb. 2018.
  5. ^ Marshall, P. D. Celebrity and Power: Fame in Contemporary Culture. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis;London;, 2014, doi:10.5749/j.ctt7zw6qj.
  6. ^ Lundby K (ed.) (2009) Mediatization: Concept, Changes, Consequences. New York: Peter Lang
  7. ^ Barry, E. (2008). Celebrity, cultural production and public life. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 11(3), 251-258. doi:10.1177/1367877908092583
  8. ^ a b c d Furedi, F. Soc (2010) "Celebrity Culture" 47: 493. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12115-010-9367-6
  9. ^ a b c Furedi, Frank (2010-09-23). "Celebrity Culture". Society. 47 (6): 493–497. doi:10.1007/s12115-010-9367-6. ISSN 0147-2011. 
  10. ^ Fox, S. "Spectacular Girls: Media Fascination & Celebrity Culture." Womens Studies-an Interdisciplinary Journal, vol. 44, no. 4, 2015, pp. 577-577.
  11. ^ a b https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19392390903519057?scroll=top&needAccess=true
  12. ^ Couldry, Nick. "Celebrity Culture and Public Connection". 
  13. ^ "Statista Instagram Facts". 
  14. ^ Homes, Redmond, Su, Sean (2006). Framing celebrity : new directions in celebrity culture. London, England: Routledge. p. 369. ISBN 0415377102. Retrieved 28 March 2018.