Cemar Clay Products

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A collection of Cemar Clay Products ceramics.

Cemar Clay Products was a California pottery operating between 1935 and 1955.[1] Cemar's art pottery products, including tableware, are sought-after collectables today.

History[edit]

Cemar was founded by Cliff J. Malone and Paul Cauldwell, two former employees of the well-established (J.A.) Bauer Pottery. Cemar Pottery, like Bauer, was based in Los Angeles, California.[2] Cemar was part of the larger boom in California pottery during the World War II era when pottery imports from Asia were restricted or banned; a variety of potteries operated in California to keep up with domestic demand. Cemar was one of 13 members of the California Pottery Guild in 1952.[3]

Cemar's products include giftware, tableware, and garden pottery.[4] Many of Cemar's designs were created by potter Fred Kaye.[5] Many items feature vegetable or fruit designs, or animal designs. Cemar products were produced in many novelty forms, including pineapple-shaped dinnerware. Items were priced at a somewhat higher-end for casual china, selling at around $7.50 for a place setting in 1952.[6]

Cemar's products were featured in numerous women's magazines targeting their marketing towards America's newly affluent middle class housewives: Better Homes and Gardens in 1949;[7] House Beautiful magazine in 1951;[8] and The American Home in 1953.[9] One of Cemar's fish-shaped cookie jars is priced at more than $150 today.[10]

Cemar was bought by Bauer Pottery in the mid-1950s. Bauer reused a number of the molds formerly used by Cemar.[11]

Cemar's products are popular with collectors of California pottery as well as those who look for retro style designs.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chipman, Jack (1999). Collector's Encyclopedia of California Pottery. Paducah, Kentucky: Collector Books. p. 298. ISBN 1574320378. 
  2. ^ "Cemar Clay Products". Potteries of California. Retrieved October 3, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Article". Department store economist. Chilton Company. 15: 111. 1952. 
  4. ^ "Cemar Clay Products". Potteries of California. Retrieved October 3, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Cemar Clay Products". Potteries of California. Retrieved October 3, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Article". Department store economist. Chilton Company. 15: 112. 1952. 
  7. ^ "Article". Better homes and gardens. 27 (7-8): 106. 1949. 
  8. ^ "Article". House Beautiful. 93 (2): 151. 1951. 
  9. ^ "Article". American Home. American Home Pub. Co. 51: 108. 1953. 
  10. ^ Chipman, Jack (1999). Collector's Encyclopedia of California Pottery. Paducah, Kentucky: Collector Books. p. 33. ISBN 1574320378. 
  11. ^ Tuchman, Mitch; Jack Chipman; Peter Brenner (1995). Bauer, classic American pottery. Chronicle Books. p. 75. ISBN 9780811809016.