Centennial Station

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Olympia–Lacey, WA
Amtrak inter-city rail station
Olympia station.jpg
Waiting room at Centennial Station
Location6600 Yelm Highway SE
Lacey, Washington, U.S.[1]
Coordinates46°59′29″N 122°47′39″W / 46.99145°N 122.79403°W / 46.99145; -122.79403Coordinates: 46°59′29″N 122°47′39″W / 46.99145°N 122.79403°W / 46.99145; -122.79403
Owned byBNSF Railway and Intercity Transit[2]
Line(s)BNSF Railway Seattle Subdivision
Platforms1 side platform
Tracks2
ConnectionsIntercity Transit
Construction
ParkingFree
Disabled accessYes
Other information
Station codeOLW
History
OpenedMay 1, 1993
Passengers
201866,442[3]Increase 4.76%
Services
Preceding station BSicon LOGO Amtrak2.svg Amtrak Following station
Centralia Coast Starlight Tacoma
toward Seattle
Centralia Amtrak Cascades Tacoma
Suspended services
Centralia Coast Starlight Tacoma Dome
toward Seattle
Centralia Amtrak Cascades Tacoma Dome
Former services
Preceding station BSicon LOGO Amtrak2.svg Amtrak Following station
Tacoma
toward Seattle
Pioneer
Discontinued in 1997
Centralia
toward Chicago
Joint Great Northern/Northern Pacific/
Union Pacific service at East Olympia
Preceding station Great Northern Railway Following station
Plumb
toward Portland
Portland–Seattle Line Kyro
toward Seattle
Preceding station Northern Pacific Railway Following station
Plumb
toward Portland
Portland–Seattle Line Kryo
toward Seattle
Preceding station Union Pacific Railroad Following station
Plumb
toward Portland
Portland–Seattle Line Kryo
toward Seattle
Location
Olympia–Lacey, WA is located in Washington (state)
Olympia–Lacey, WA
Olympia–Lacey, WA
Location in Washington
Olympia–Lacey, WA is located in the United States
Olympia–Lacey, WA
Olympia–Lacey, WA
Location in the United States

The Centennial Station (also known as Olympia–Lacey) is a train station located immediately south of Lacey, Washington, United States that also serves the capital city of Olympia. The station is served by Amtrak's (the National Railroad Passenger Corporation) Amtrak Cascades and Coast Starlight.

Local transit connections are provided by Intercity Transit. Bus routes 64 and 94 connect to Lacey and Olympia Transit centers.[4][5]

History[edit]

The original Union Pacific East Olympia station in East Olympia was demolished in the late 1960s. It was used by the pool trains that ran between Seattle and Portland by all three railroads that used the line, Northern Pacific, Great Northern, and Union Pacific. Northern Pacific also had a station at Kyro, approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) northeast of the current station. Amtrak trains during the 1970s and 1980s used a wooden shelter as East Olympia's passenger train station. However, the station site was remote and had no public transport, no lighting and a pot-holed gravel parking lot with a public telephone that rarely worked.[6]

The stop was listed in the October 28, 1990 Coast Starlight timetable.[7][8] The new Centennial Station was built by the non-profit Amtrak Depot Committee, which began raising funds in 1987 and aimed to open a permanent station in time for the state centennial in 1989.[6] The committee raised $500,000 through government grants, business contributions, individual donations, and the sale of engraved bricks that were later laid in the station plaza.[9] Centennial Station opened to the public on May 1, 1993, following the delayed installation of a sewer system, and was added to the Amtrak system.[6][10]

It is believed to be the only Amtrak station in the nation both built[citation needed] and operated entirely by volunteers.[11] The train station was sold to Intercity Transit for $1 in September 1993, while the Amtrak Depot Committee remained the main operators of the facility.[12] The committee also raised $10,000 to install a 10-foot (3.0 m) clocktower in the courtyard, which was dedicated on November 14, 1994, as part of a ceremony for the Talgo trainsets entering service on the Seattle–Portland corridor.[13] The station's parking lot was expanded to 133 stalls as part of an improvement project that was completed in 2001.[14] A second improvement project, completed in 2003, included a rebuilt train platform for accessibility and the installation of an electronic information kiosk.[11][15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Lacey, WA – Olympia (OLW)". amtrak.com. Amtrak. Retrieved January 11, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Great American Stations: Olympia-Lacey, WA (OLW)". amtrak.com. Amtrak. Retrieved January 11, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Amtrak Fact Sheet, Fiscal Year 2018, State of Washington" (PDF). amtrak.com. Amtrak. June 2019. Retrieved December 28, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Route 64". www.intercitytransit.com. Intercity Transit. Archived from the original on January 12, 2014. Retrieved January 11, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Route 94". www.intercitytransit.com. Intercity Transit. Archived from the original on January 12, 2014. Retrieved January 11, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ a b c Hall, C.B. (February 21, 2012). "Amtrak finds it hard to take citizens' help, even when they build a station". Crosscut.com. Retrieved February 22, 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "Amtrak National Train Timetables". The Museum of Railway Timetables. Amtrak. October 28, 1990. Olympia/Lacey, WA–Yelm Hwy. and Burlington Northern RR Tracks, Lacey 98503
  8. ^ "Amtrak National Train Timetables". The Museum of Railway Timetables. Amtrak. October 28, 1990. Retrieved May 24, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ Satir, F.E. (March 9, 1997). "Volunteers transform 'Amshack' into showplace". The Olympian. p. D1.
  10. ^ Smith, Jeff (May 2, 1993). "At last, doors open to Amtrak depot". The Olympian. p. C1.
  11. ^ a b "Train Platform Improved at Olympia/Lacey Centennial Station". Washington State Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on September 6, 2006. Retrieved February 26, 2007. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ Coffidis, Joel (September 22, 1993). "Volunteers sell train station to IT for $1". The Olympian. p. C3.
  13. ^ Coffidis, Joel (November 13, 1994). "New courtyard clock to welcome Talgo's return to depot". The Olympian. p. C1.
  14. ^ "Amtrak station gets more parking". The Olympian. August 5, 2001. p. C1.
  15. ^ "Upgrades finished at Amtrak depot". The Olympian. August 5, 2003. p. B3.

External links[edit]