Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security

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Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security
Abbreviation CHS[1]
Formation 1998; 19 years ago (1998)[1]
Type Think tank
Location
CEO and Director
Tom Inglesby
COO and Deputy Director
Anita Cicero
Key people
Affiliations Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Staff (2017)
23[2]
Mission "Protect people's health from the consequences of epidemics and disasters and ensure that communities are resilient to major challenges."[3]
Website www.centerforhealthsecurity.org
Formerly called
  • Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies (1998–2003)
  • Center for Biosecurity of UPMC (2003–2013)
  • UPMC Center for Health Security (2013–2017)

The Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security (abbreviated CHS; previously the UPMC Center for Health Security,[4] the Center for Biosecurity of UPMC, and the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies) is an independent, nonprofit organization of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health that works in the area of health consequences from epidemics and disasters. It is a think tank that does policy research and gives policy recommendations to the United States government.[5][1]

History[edit]

The Center for Health Security began as the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies (CCBS) in 1998 at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.[6] D. A. Henderson served as the founding director.[7] At that time, the Center was the first and only academic center focused on biosecurity policy and practice.

At one point around 2003, CHS had become part of a new umbrella organization called the Institute for Global Health and Security at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.[6][8][9]

In November 2003, the leaders left Johns Hopkins to join the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), and relaunched the Center as the Center for Biosecurity of UPMC. This move apparently split the organization in two, and it is unclear what happened to the old organization.[6]

On April 30, 2013, the Center changed its name from "Center for Biosecurity of UPMC" to "UPMC Center for Health Security". This name change reflected a broadening of the scope of CHS's work.

In January 2017, the Center became part of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Its domain name changed from upmchealthsecurity.org to centerforhealthsecurity.org.[4]

Funding[edit]

In 2002, the Center received a $1 million grant from the US federal government.[10]

Before 2017, CHS was heavily reliant on government funding.[1]

In January 2017, the Open Philanthropy Project awarded a $16 million grant over three years to the Center for Health Security.[1][11][12]

Publications[edit]

The Center for Health Security publishes three online newsletters:

  • Clinicians' Biosecurity News (formerly the Clinicians' Biosecurity Network Report), published twice each month[13]
  • Health Security Headlines, a daily news digest[14] (previously called Biosecurity Briefing,[15] then Biosecurity News in Brief starting in 2009,[16] then Biosecurity News Today starting in 2010 or 2011,[17] and finally Health Security Headlines starting in 2013;[18][19] the digest used to also be weekly until in February 2009)[20]
  • Preparedness Pulsepoints, published weekly[21]

It also provides editorial oversight for the journal Health Security,[22] which was launched in 2003 and called Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science until 2015.[23]

CHS also publishes the blog The Bifurcated Needle.[24]

The Open Philanthropy Project's grant writeup of CHS noted several publications:[1]

The Center has published in journals including JAMA and The Lancet. A full list of publications is available on the CHS website. As of February 2017, the list shows more than 400 publications.[25]

Major conferences and events[edit]

Atlantic Storm[edit]

On January 14, 2005, CHS helped to host Atlantic Storm, a table-top smallpox bioterrorism simulation.[1]

Operation Dark Winter[edit]

From June 22–23, 2001, CHS co-hosted Operation Dark Winter, a senior-level bioterrorism attack simulation involving a covert and widespread smallpox attack on the United States.

Other[edit]

  • Improving Epidemic Response: Building Bridges Between the US and China. May 2012.
  • Considerations for the Reauthorization of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act (PAHPA). March 2012.
  • U.S. Preparedness for a Nuclear Detonation. October 2011.
  • Charting the Future of Biosecurity: Ten Years After the Anthrax Attacks. October 2011.
  • Advancing US Resilience to a Nuclear Catastrophe. May 2011.
  • Preserving National Security: The Growing Role of the Life Sciences. March 2011.
  • Improving Global Health, Strengthening Global Security. November 2010.
  • The State of BIOPreparedness: Lessons from Leaders, Proposals for Progress. September 2010.
  • Preparing to Save Lives and Recover After a Nuclear Detonation: Implications for US Policy. April 2010.
  • The 2009 H1N1 Experience: Policy Implications for Future Infectious Disease Emergencies. March 2010.
  • Resilient American Communities: Progress In Practice and Policy. December 10, 2009.
  • Prevention of Biothreats: A Look Ahead. October 6, 2009.
  • Disease, Disaster, and Democracy: The Public's Stake in Health Emergency Planning. May 2006.
  • Bulls, Bears, and Birds: Preparing the Financial Industry for a Pandemic. September 2005.
  • Conference on Biosafety and Biorisks. May 2005.
  • The Public as an Asset, Not a Problem: A Summit on Leadership During Bioterrorism. February 2003.
  • 2nd National Symposium on Medical and Public Health Response to Bioterrorism. November 2000.
  • National Symposium on Medical and Public Health Response to Bioterrorism. February 1999.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security — Biosecurity, Global Health Security, and Global Catastrophic Risks". Open Philanthropy Project. Retrieved February 8, 2017. 
  2. ^ Teddy Karambelas (January 26, 2017). "Our Staff". Retrieved February 9, 2017. 
  3. ^ Teddy Karambelas (February 7, 2017). "JHSPH Center for Health Security". Retrieved February 9, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Price Tyson (January 16, 2017). "Center for Health Security Joins Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School". Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. Retrieved February 8, 2017. the Center for Health Security, which had previously been affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), has joined the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. 
  5. ^ Center for Health Security Mission Statement Archived June 22, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.
  6. ^ a b c Roos, Robert (September 23, 2003). "Johns Hopkins biodefense experts head in new direction". CIDRAP. Retrieved February 8, 2017. the four full-time faculty members and 16 administrative staff members of the CCBS are all leaving Hopkins to join the UPMC. 'No decision has been made exactly what to do with the Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies, whether it'll have a new direction or mission incorporated into some other center,' [Tim Parsons] said. 'But its biodefense activities will be incorporated in some way into the new initiative of the Institute for Global Health Security.' 
  7. ^ UPMC Center for Health Security (January 18, 2017). "D. A. Henderson". Retrieved February 10, 2017. He was Dean Emeritus and Professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and a Founding Director (1998) of the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies. 
  8. ^ Parsons, Tim (September 22, 2003). "Public Health forms Global Health, Security Institute". Johns Hopkins Gazette. Retrieved February 10, 2017. 
  9. ^ JH Bloomberg School of Public Health (September 16, 2003). "Institute for Global Health and Security". Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Retrieved February 10, 2017. 
  10. ^ JH Bloomberg School of Public Health (January 7, 2002). "Biodefense Center to Receive $1 Million". Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Retrieved February 10, 2017. 
  11. ^ Associated Press (February 8, 2017). "Hopkins' Center for Health Security gets $16M grant". Maryland Daily Record. Retrieved February 8, 2017. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Health Security has been awarded a three-year, $16 million grant to support work on strengthening health security and public health preparedness. 
  12. ^ "Center for Health Security gets $16M grant". The Washington Times. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017. 
  13. ^ Center for Biosecurity of UPMC (January 16, 2017). "About Clinicians' Biosecurity News". UPMC Center for Health Security. Retrieved February 9, 2017. 
  14. ^ Center for Biosecurity of UPMC (January 31, 2017). "Health Security Headlines". Retrieved February 9, 2017. 
  15. ^ Center for Biosecurity of UPMC (September 21, 2007). "Biosecurity Briefing". Archived from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved February 10, 2017. 
  16. ^ Center for Biosecurity of UPMC (April 30, 2009). "Biosecurity News in Brief -- Center for Biosecurity of UPMC". Archived from the original on May 1, 2009. Retrieved February 10, 2017. 
  17. ^ Center for Biosecurity of UPMC (July 15, 2011). "Biosecurity News Today". Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved February 10, 2017. Biosecurity News Today 
  18. ^ Center for Biosecurity of UPMC (August 13, 2012). "Center for Biosecurity | UPMC | Biosecurity News Today". Archived from the original on February 6, 2013. Retrieved February 10, 2017. 
  19. ^ Center for Biosecurity of UPMC (July 1, 2013). "Health Security Headlines | Published by UPMC Center for Health Security". Archived from the original on July 11, 2013. Retrieved February 10, 2017. 
  20. ^ Solomon, John (February 5, 2009). "Weekly "Biosecurity Briefing" E-Newsletter Is Becoming A Daily". In Case Of Emergency, Read Blog. Retrieved February 10, 2017. I am happy to report that a helpful weekly email resource is going daily beginning this Monday. The Biosecurity Briefing, published by the Baltimore-based Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, is being expanded. 
  21. ^ Center for Biosecurity of UPMC (January 31, 2017). "Preparedness Pulsepoints". Retrieved February 9, 2017. 
  22. ^ Rob Adams (January 18, 2017). "Our Work". Retrieved February 9, 2017. Journal: The Center provides editorial oversight for the peer-reviewed journal, Health Security, which is published 6 times per year. 
  23. ^ "Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science | Issue List". Retrieved February 9, 2017. 
  24. ^ "About". The Bifurcated Needle. Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. Retrieved February 10, 2017. 
  25. ^ "All Publications". Retrieved February 9, 2017. 

External links[edit]