Center for Popular Democracy

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Center for Popular Democracy
AbbreviationCPD
Formation2012
Founded atNew York City, United States
TypeNonprofit
PurposeProgressive political advocacy[1]
HeadquartersBrooklyn, New York
Co-Executive Directors
Andrew Friedman
Ana Maria Archila
Brian Kettenring
Revenue (2013)
$3,046,684[2]
Expenses (2013)$2,869,329[2]
Websitepopulardemocracy.org

The Center for Popular Democracy (CPD) is an American advocacy group that promotes progressive politics.[3][4][5] CPD is a federation of groups that includes some of the old chapters of ACORN.[6] The group's stated goal is to "envision and win an innovative pro-worker, pro-immigrant, racial and economic justice agenda."[7] The organization is allied with teachers’ unions and has published studies criticizing charter schools.[8][9]

Campaigns and actions[edit]

The organization gained national prominence during the protests over Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the United States Supreme Court. One of the organization's co-executive directors, Ana Maria Archila, confronted U.S. Senator Jeff Flake over his support for the judge[10][11] and other activists had questions for U.S. Senator Rand Paul.[12]

Private prisons[edit]

CPD has run a years-long campaign against private prisons, and prison companies have warned investors that activist groups are a threat to their future profitability.[13] This notice to investors came after lenders like JP Morgan Chase bowed to pressure from CPD and other groups and agreed to stop doing business with prison companies.[14]

Local Progress[edit]

Local Progress is a project of CPD, and works to organize grassroots groups on the outside and progressive politicians on the inside to advance an inside/outside strategy for change. It was founded in 2012 to connect progressive leaders in different cities so they can learn from each other's experiences, share policy ideas and model legislation.[15] It also regularly brings local officials together so they can learn from each other in person and share ideas.[16][17] Local Progress board members include Brad Lander, Helen Gym, Gregorio Casar, Phillipe Cunningham, Tefere Gebre, Lorena González, and other local officials and national progressive leaders.[18]

Funding[edit]

CPD has received funding from the Bauman Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Democracy Alliance,[6] and the Open Society Foundations.[19][20][21][22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gillespie, Patrick (November 11, 2014). "Liberals and conservatives blast the Fed". CNN. Retrieved 30 July 2015.
  2. ^ a b "IRS Form 990 2013" (PDF). Internal Revenue Service. Retrieved 30 July 2015.
  3. ^ Marrans, Daniel (July 29, 2015). "The Fed Just Inched Closer To Raising Interest Rates". Huffington Post. Retrieved 30 July 2015.
  4. ^ Applebaum, Binyamin (November 14, 2014). "Face to Face With the Fed, Workers Ask for More Help". New York Times. Retrieved 30 July 2015.
  5. ^ Applebaum, Binyamin (March 3, 2015). "Black Jobless Rates Remain High, but Fed Can Only Do So Much to Help". New York Times. Retrieved 30 July 2015.
  6. ^ a b Judis, John (June 20, 2015). "Dear Democrats: Populism Will Not Save You". National Journal. Retrieved 30 July 2015.
  7. ^ "Mission". Center for Popular Democracy. Retrieved 30 July 2015.
  8. ^ Brown, Emma (March 24, 2014). "California charter schools vulnerable to fraud, report says". Washington Post. Retrieved 30 July 2015.
  9. ^ Payton, Bre (October 3, 2014). "5 things to know about new charter school fraud report". Watchdog.org. Retrieved 30 July 2015.
  10. ^ "Who were the women who confronted Sen. Jeff Flake about Kavanaugh vote in an elevator?". Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  11. ^ "The Final Days of the Brett Kavanaugh Protests". Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  12. ^ "Senator Rand Paul confronted by activists at airport". Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  13. ^ Stockler, Asher (May 8, 2019). "Private prison company GEO Group says activists pose risk to bottom line". newsweek.com. Newsweek. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  14. ^ Rueb, Emily (March 6, 2019). "JPMorgan Chase Stops Funding Private Prison Companies, and Immigration Activists Applaud". nytimes.com. The New York Times. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  15. ^ DePillis, Lydia (January 4, 2016). "Meet the lefty club behind a blitz of new laws in cities around the country". washingtonpost.com. The Washington Post. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  16. ^ Early, Steve (August 8, 2017). "Diverse, Radical and Ready to Resist: Meet the First in the New Wave of Local Progressive Officials". inthesetimes.com. In These Times. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  17. ^ Bradley, Bill (March 29, 2017). "City Leaders Met Yesterday in NYC to Strategize the Resistance". nextcity.org. NextCity. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  18. ^ "Board Members". Local Progress. Local Progress. Retrieved May 21, 2019.
  19. ^ "Analysis - No, George Soros isn't paying Kavanaugh protesters". Washington Post. Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  20. ^ Center for Popular Democracy — Fed Up Campaign (2015),
  21. ^ "A conversation with Brian Kettenring on October 16, 2014" (PDF). GiveWell. Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  22. ^ "OSPC Summary of Lobbying Activities: 2016, Third Quarter". Open Society Policy Center. Retrieved 15 October 2018.